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Egress From Gulfstream V With Parachute?  
User currently offlinejawed From United States of America, joined Sep 2006, 482 posts, RR: 0
Posted (2 years 1 month 3 weeks 21 hours ago) and read 5326 times:

I know this is a far-fetched scenario, but would it be theoretically possible for a person to egress from a Gulfstream private aircraft in flight using a parachute?

Let's assume that the pilot could slow down the jet as much as possible (while still maintaining lift), and that the jet could be flown to a much lower altitude (like 6,000ft vs 40,000 ft) where breathing is possible.

Could the doors even be opened in flight? Or would this by itself be completely impossible due to the pressurized cabin?

17 replies: All unread, jump to last
 
User currently offlineStarlionblue From Greenland, joined Feb 2004, 16999 posts, RR: 67
Reply 1, posted (2 years 1 month 3 weeks 20 hours ago) and read 5300 times:

If you're at 6000ft there need not be a pressure difference so that's not a problem. However there may be slipstream issues. Which way does the door open?

If you don't hit the wing, stabilizer or engines there are no problems really.



"There are no stupid questions, but there are a lot of inquisitive idiots."
User currently offlinerfields5421 From United States of America, joined Jul 2007, 7605 posts, RR: 32
Reply 2, posted (2 years 1 month 3 weeks 20 hours ago) and read 5298 times:

The door can come open. It might not be designed to come open in flight, but if there is a malfunction as we saw with the Challenger recently - it could happen.

I personally would never try to jump out a door that far forward with the wing right where I would be blown as I exited the aircraft. Even the WWII movies where we see folks jumping from DC-3s flying under 80 KIAS, they are blown backward quite a bit.

At 150 knots (the jump would have to be with the gear retracted) it is going to move the jumper 30-50 feet straight back before the downward movement starts.

[Edited 2012-06-06 16:59:24]

User currently offlineKPWMSpotter From United States of America, joined Dec 2006, 433 posts, RR: 2
Reply 3, posted (2 years 1 month 3 weeks 19 hours ago) and read 5284 times:

I toured the Bombardier Learjet facility in Wichita recently. The prototype Global Express was hangared there, it was outfitted with a small ballistic parachute in the tail. The parachute was apparently installed to help stabilize the aircraft if it entered a deep stall condition. The flight test engineer I was talking to stated that it wasn't there to help save the aircraft, it was there to buy the pilots some extra time as they ran for the door.

That being said, it would seem that the people at Bombardier were willing to give it a shot from a Global Express in an extreme scenario. It's likely that the door was also outfitted with some sort of explosive bolt system during flight test to assist an emergency egress too though.

Most business jets aren't equipped with plug doors, making it easier for someone to potentially open a door in flight. I'm not entirely sure about the Gulfstream, but most jets with integral airstairs in the doors aren't plug type. That being said, even if you could open the door, there's still an awful lot of stuff (wing, engines, tail) to dodge after jumping out. Probably not a very good idea to try...



I reject your reality and substitute my own...
User currently offlineKELPkid From United States of America, joined Nov 2005, 6343 posts, RR: 3
Reply 4, posted (2 years 1 month 3 weeks 19 hours ago) and read 5251 times:

My #1 fear:

Getting sucked into the #1 engine

#2:

Whack the wing, get knocked unconscious, or fatally wounded, and at the same time render the aircraft uncontrollable somehow

#3:

The same as #2, but on the vertical stabilizer or tail. Yes, relative airflow can pick you up    D.B. Cooper had the right idea, egress from a point in the aircraft that is free of flight surfaces and engines  



Celebrating the birth of KELPkidJR on August 5, 2009 :-)
User currently offlineChese From United States of America, joined Sep 2006, 29 posts, RR: 0
Reply 5, posted (2 years 1 month 3 weeks 15 hours ago) and read 5172 times:

The only real shot you have is going out the baggage door. It is accessible from the cabin and big enough to egress out through.


Note to airliners.net admins, I will not like you on Facebook.
User currently offlineMax Q From United States of America, joined May 2001, 4375 posts, RR: 19
Reply 6, posted (2 years 1 month 3 weeks 14 hours ago) and read 5150 times:

Cant beat the 727 for best Civilian jet to jump from,




Straight out the back..



The best contribution to safety is a competent Pilot.
User currently offlineMD-90 From United States of America, joined Jan 2000, 8502 posts, RR: 12
Reply 7, posted (2 years 1 month 3 weeks 13 hours ago) and read 5118 times:

Am I the only one that thinks that if you opened a G-V's door in flight it would be ripped off of the aircraft!?


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User currently offlineStarlionblue From Greenland, joined Feb 2004, 16999 posts, RR: 67
Reply 8, posted (2 years 1 month 3 weeks 13 hours ago) and read 5111 times:

Quoting MD-90 (Reply 7):
Am I the only one that thinks that if you opened a G-V's door in flight it would be ripped off of the aircraft!?

I don't know if it would be ripped off. Those hinges are pretty strong. Also there may be a certification requirement stating that if a door opens in flight it shouldn't smash right into the engine. 

I do imagine there'd be some warping of the door frame.



"There are no stupid questions, but there are a lot of inquisitive idiots."
User currently offlineHAWK21M From India, joined Jan 2001, 31667 posts, RR: 56
Reply 9, posted (2 years 1 month 3 weeks 10 hours ago) and read 5075 times:

Quoting Max Q (Reply 6):
Cant beat the 727 for best Civilian jet to jump from,

Until the cooper lock got fitted  



Think of the brighter side!
User currently offlinerfields5421 From United States of America, joined Jul 2007, 7605 posts, RR: 32
Reply 10, posted (2 years 1 month 3 weeks 6 hours ago) and read 5006 times:

Quoting MD-90 (Reply 7):
Am I the only one that thinks that if you opened a G-V's door in flight it would be ripped off of the aircraft!?

There is a thread around here about a recent incident with a Bombardier Challenger where a very similar door came open in flight.

Challenger Door Falls Off In Opa Locka - Follow Up (by my1le May 29 2012 in Civil Aviation)

The step part of the door came off the aircraft. But suprisingly did not hit any flight surface.


User currently offlinedlednicer From United States of America, joined May 2005, 542 posts, RR: 7
Reply 11, posted (2 years 1 month 3 weeks 2 hours ago) and read 4889 times:
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DATABASE EDITOR

Quoting KPWMSpotter (Reply 3):
The prototype Global Express was hangared there, it was outfitted with a small ballistic parachute in the tail. The parachute was apparently installed to help stabilize the aircraft if it entered a deep stall condition.

The prototype Canadair Challenger was fitted with just such a parachute. In flight test on April 3, 1980, the plane entered a deep stall condition and the pilot fired the chute. The chute helped the aircraft recover from the deep stall, but then the pilot found that he couldn't jettison it. The co-pilot and flight test engineer bailed out through the aft baggage door. The pilot for some reason waited too long and didn't make it out before impact.

Bombardier then made the activation of the parachute a two-step process: first close the jaws securing the chute and then fire the chute. On July 26, 1993, a CRJ100 in flight test entered a deep stall. In his haste, the pilot did step two without doing step one. The chute was ejected from the airplane. The crew of three was killed in the ensuing crash.


User currently offlineMax Q From United States of America, joined May 2001, 4375 posts, RR: 19
Reply 12, posted (2 years 1 month 2 weeks 6 days 23 hours ago) and read 4827 times:

Quoting HAWK21M (Reply 9):

Until the cooper lock got fitted

That can be removed, or even better, as has been done like in the recent radio controlled crash in Mexico where they remove the entire rear airstairs.



The best contribution to safety is a competent Pilot.
User currently offlineMD-90 From United States of America, joined Jan 2000, 8502 posts, RR: 12
Reply 13, posted (2 years 1 month 2 weeks 5 days 17 hours ago) and read 4567 times:

Quoting rfields5421 (Reply 10):
There is a thread around here about a recent incident with a Bombardier Challenger where a very similar door came open in flight.

Thanks for the link, I didn't see that thread the first time around.


User currently offlinesoon7x7 From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 14, posted (2 years 1 month 2 weeks 5 days 16 hours ago) and read 4552 times:

Quoting Chese (Reply 5):
The only real shot you have is going out the baggage door. It is accessible from the cabin and big enough to egress out through.


The only way to exit any Gulfstream during flight is out the baggage. The airstair would not survive the opening, nor would the jumper. As far as the overwing exits, you got big suckers too close to the wing, instant chopmeat. Better consider a different ship for the jump!


User currently offlinejawed From United States of America, joined Sep 2006, 482 posts, RR: 0
Reply 15, posted (2 years 1 month 2 weeks 2 days 3 hours ago) and read 4116 times:

That's a very interesting idea. I hadn't thought of the baggage door as an inflight-egress.

Could any Gulfstream Pilots comment on how realistic this is? (assuming a total emergency and that you have a parachute)

Quoting soon7x7 (Reply 14):
The only way to exit any Gulfstream during flight is out the baggage. The airstair would not survive the opening, nor would the jumper. As far as the overwing exits, you got big suckers too close to the wing, instant chopmeat. Better consider a different ship for the jump!


User currently offlinesoon7x7 From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 16, posted (2 years 1 month 2 weeks 1 day ago) and read 3890 times:

I'm not a Gulfstream Pilot but I am a pilot and MX and working on a G-V today...I'll shoot you a shot of the hatch...it is located under the port engine pylon, aft of the intake and away from the exhaust. In addition the door tracks up INSIDE the baggage compartment...I would believe it to be most probable...g

User currently offlineHAWK21M From India, joined Jan 2001, 31667 posts, RR: 56
Reply 17, posted (2 years 1 month 1 week 6 days 13 hours ago) and read 3692 times:

Quoting Max Q (Reply 12):
That can be removed, or even better, as has been done like in the recent radio controlled crash in Mexico where they remove the entire rear airstairs.

True....a deliberate mod for the purpose can of course be executed.



Think of the brighter side!
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