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Holding Short Of A Taxiway  
User currently offlinecrank From Canada, joined May 2001, 1562 posts, RR: 2
Posted (2 years 3 months 6 days 11 hours ago) and read 5270 times:

What's the minimum distance that must be kept between the aircraft and the edge of a taxiway when instructed to hold short of a taxiway by ATC? I searched the CARs (Canadian Aviation Regulations) but I couldn't find anything.

8 replies: All unread, jump to last
 
User currently offlineDavid L From United Kingdom, joined May 1999, 9524 posts, RR: 42
Reply 1, posted (2 years 3 months 6 days 11 hours ago) and read 5260 times:

I can't help with the regulations but anecdotal evidence from a recent PPRuNe thread suggests only that no part of the aircraft should cross the line. No mention of having to leave any distance between the aircraft and the line.

Hopefully someone who actually knows will chip in.


User currently offlinecrank From Canada, joined May 2001, 1562 posts, RR: 2
Reply 2, posted (2 years 3 months 6 days 11 hours ago) and read 5244 times:

That sounds more like a hold short instruction for a runway, where no part of the aircraft must cross the hold short line(s). Around here there aren't any hold short lines at taxiway intersections, that's why I'm looking to find out if there's actually a minimum distance or if you're fine as long as no parts of the aircraft physically enter the taxiway.

Like you said I'm sure someone will come up with more information or a regulation.


User currently offlineDavid L From United Kingdom, joined May 1999, 9524 posts, RR: 42
Reply 3, posted (2 years 3 months 6 days 10 hours ago) and read 5210 times:

The comparison was made to holding short of a runway, i.e. no part of the aircraft must enter the taxiway. Here's a link:

http://www.pprune.org/tech-log/49075...-basic-instruction-hold-short.html


User currently offlinerfields5421 From United States of America, joined Jul 2007, 7607 posts, RR: 32
Reply 4, posted (2 years 3 months 6 days 9 hours ago) and read 5144 times:

I've been told to hold short of a taxiway several times because of other aircraft on the main taxiway at the airport I fly LSA aircraft. Normally, I stop at the taxiway designator sign which puts me about 75 feet from the cross taxiway edge.

Once it was for a B727, and the tower told me to be sure to not go to past the taxiway sign.

At another nearby airport, I came off the runway and was told to hold short of the parallel taxiway for an AA B767 on taxi in the opposite direction I needed to go. The tower told me to stop at the runway hold short - which gave me about 25 feet of clearance from his wing tip as he went by.


User currently offlinelonghauler From Canada, joined Mar 2004, 5055 posts, RR: 43
Reply 5, posted (2 years 3 months 6 days 8 hours ago) and read 5123 times:

Whenever given a hold short clearance with regard to a taxiway, I have always read it that you remain clear enough from the intersection that it can still be used in any direction.

For example, if you are on A, and are told to hold short of B. You must leave enough room so that an aircraft can cross A on B, or turn onto A from B (heading the same direction as you). There are rarely "hold short" signs or markings on a taxiway, unless they are related to a runway, or an approach.



Never gonna grow up, never gonna slow down .... Barefoot Blue Jean Night
User currently offlineARFFdude From United States of America, joined Aug 2007, 152 posts, RR: 1
Reply 6, posted (2 years 3 months 5 days 7 hours ago) and read 4837 times:

Some airports will have painted markings or surface lights to designate taxiway holding positions, for use when you're instructed to hold short of a taxiway X while you're on taxiway Y. The painted marking is a single dashed line running perpendicular to the solid centerline, and the surface lights consist of 3 amber lights, one on the centerline, and two to either side of it.

The exact placement of the markings and lights is determined by the design group for the airport, which is in turn determined by the design aircraft of the airport. The design aircraft is the largest aircraft type expected to be used at the specific airport (specifically, the largest aircraft that has least 500 annual operations), and basically all dimensions, such as the location of hold bars, the widths of taxiways, the dimensions of safety areas, and a million other little things are all based around that design aircraft.

See page 11 here, under the heading "INTERMEDIATE HOLDING POSITION MARKINGS FOR TAXIIWAY/TAXIWAY INTERSECTIONS."

Look at the top of page 12 for a table that shows you exactly what distances are required. If the airport in question is a design group IV, for example, the holding position markings will be 129.5 from the centerline of the intersecting runway.

Seehere for a graphical example, It's on the last page, bottom right figure.


User currently offlineDavid L From United Kingdom, joined May 1999, 9524 posts, RR: 42
Reply 7, posted (2 years 3 months 4 days 23 hours ago) and read 4758 times:

Quoting ARFFdude (Reply 6):

So any precise rules are likely to be airport-specific and/or taxiway-specific?


User currently offlineARFFdude From United States of America, joined Aug 2007, 152 posts, RR: 1
Reply 8, posted (2 years 3 months 4 days 12 hours ago) and read 4601 times:

Quoting David L (Reply 7):
So any precise rules are likely to be airport-specific and/or taxiway-specific?

Pretty much. It all depends on what design aircraft the airport was built around. The wingspan of the design aircraft will determine what design group the airport falls into (I through IV).

Say for instance the largest aircraft your airport is expected to handle (would be the Design Aircraft) is a CRJ-900. A check of wikipedia tells me that a CRJ-900 has a wingspan of 81.5 feet, which puts it into Design Group III. For a Design Group III airport, all of these intermediary taxiway holding position markings would be exactly 93 feet from the centerline of the intersecting runway.

The Advisory Circular has this to say with regards on where pilots are to stop:

Quote:
Pilots when instructed by the airport traffic control tower to "hold short of (taxiway designation)" must stop so no part of the aircraft extends beyond the boundary of the intermediate holding position marking.

Now keep in mind this all only applies to intersections with the painted surface markings. I assume for intersections that do not have them (which are most intersections), pilots are to use their best judgement.


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