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Pregnant Flight Attendants  
User currently offlineBen175 From Australia, joined Jul 2008, 677 posts, RR: 0
Posted (2 years 1 week 21 hours ago) and read 15511 times:

Hi guys,

Yesterday I flew JQ HNL-SYD in J class and was absolutely shocked to find TWO pregnant flight attendants serving the cabin, one being due in 2-3 months! Now obviously if they are capable of their jobs and can keep passengers safe, this is obviously fine. However, the one more heavily pregnant simply used her pregnancy as an excuse not to do anything, for example saying to a very short women who couldn't reach the overhead compartment "Sorry I can't lift that bag, I'm six months pregnant."

I'm sorry, but if you can't lift that bag - how the hell are you going to assist in an evacuation or prepare a raft should my plane had crash landed somewhere in the Pacific ocean!? I was absolutely appalled and it made me wonder when do flight attendants go on maternity leave?

Thanks for your input
Ben

[Edited 2012-07-22 17:46:40]

51 replies: All unread, showing first 25:
 
User currently offlineBMI727 From United States of America, joined Feb 2009, 15719 posts, RR: 26
Reply 1, posted (2 years 1 week 21 hours ago) and read 15522 times:

Quoting Ben175 (Thread starter):
However, the one more heavily pregnant simply used her pregnancy as an excuse not to do anything, saying to a very short women who couldn't reach the overhead compartment "Sorry I can't lift that bag, I'm six months pregnant."

I'm pretty sure a lot of airlines don't let flight attendants lift bags into overhead bins at all due to injury concerns, but that may be an American thing.



Why do Aerospace Engineering students have to turn things in on time?
User currently offlineAirframeAS From United States of America, joined Feb 2004, 14150 posts, RR: 24
Reply 2, posted (2 years 1 week 21 hours ago) and read 15475 times:

Quoting Ben175 (Thread starter):
"Sorry I can't lift that bag

In general, it is not their job. At the airline I work for, FA's are prohibited from lifting bags and putting them in the overhead bins. It is a safety issue. It keeps OJI costs down and it is also a union work rule as well in which I do agree with. And no, I am not a FA.

Quoting Ben175 (Thread starter):
I'm sorry, but if you can't lift that bag - how the hell are you going to assist in an evacuation or prepare a raft should my plane had crash landed somewhere in the Pacific ocean!?

Lifting a bag has absolutely nothing to do with assisting in an evacuation of an aircraft.   



A Safe Flight Begins With Quality Maintenance On The Ground.
User currently offlinexjramper From United States of America, joined Dec 2003, 2460 posts, RR: 51
Reply 3, posted (2 years 1 week 21 hours ago) and read 15471 times:

So you equate lifting a bag to your safety? In fact, over all the safety briefings I have seen over the years specifically state to leave all of your items behind during an evacuation.

The F/As don't lift much in the event of an evacuation except for a megaphone and pointing people in the appropriate exit. And for the ceiling rafts maybe she cannot lift that, but she can keep directing folks while the rest of the F/As on the flight are more than capable of doing that.

And to be completely honest, if it crash landed in the Pacific, I wouldn't think that any of this would be much help anyways.



Look ma' no hands!
User currently offlineBen175 From Australia, joined Jul 2008, 677 posts, RR: 0
Reply 4, posted (2 years 1 week 21 hours ago) and read 15456 times:

I probably should have included more examples, she made passengers pour their own coffee (saying she couldn't lean over), refused to help clean up a split drink and a broken glass and pretty much resisted anything a passenger asked her to do, either simply declining the offer or making another FA do it.

User currently offlinePHX787 From Japan, joined Mar 2012, 7226 posts, RR: 17
Reply 5, posted (2 years 1 week 21 hours ago) and read 15434 times:

Quoting BMI727 (Reply 1):
I'm pretty sure a lot of airlines don't let flight attendants lift bags into overhead bins at all due to injury concerns, but that may be an American thing.

Male flight attendants on DL often assist with lifting bags.

I've seen a few female flight attendants on DL who were preggers but I think the policy is to let them onto maternity leave about 2 months before due, but that's just my estimation. I never seen any flight attendant who was 8-9 months pregnant on the flight.



One of the FB admins for PHX Spotters. "Zach the Expat!"
User currently offlinetdscanuck From Canada, joined Jan 2006, 12709 posts, RR: 80
Reply 6, posted (2 years 1 week 21 hours ago) and read 15428 times:

Quoting Ben175 (Thread starter):
"Sorry I can't lift that bag, I'm six months pregnant."

That may be company policy for liability or health insurance reasons, rather than her choice. But, as noted, lifting bags isn't their job anyway.

Quoting Ben175 (Thread starter):
I'm sorry, but if you can't lift that bag - how the hell are you going to assist in an evacuation or prepare a raft should my plane had crash landed somewhere in the Pacific ocean!?

You've clearly never seen a pregnant woman whose baby is threatened...they'd probably paddle the plane from the middle of the Pacific to Tahiti if that's what it took.

Tom.


User currently offlineBen175 From Australia, joined Jul 2008, 677 posts, RR: 0
Reply 7, posted (2 years 1 week 21 hours ago) and read 15398 times:

Quoting PHX787 (Reply 5):

Male flight attendants on DL often assist with lifting bags.

So do flight attendants on SQ, QF, DJ, NZ, JL, CX and VX to name a select few.

[Edited 2012-07-22 18:00:49]

User currently offlineAirframeAS From United States of America, joined Feb 2004, 14150 posts, RR: 24
Reply 8, posted (2 years 1 week 21 hours ago) and read 15395 times:

Quoting PHX787 (Reply 5):
Male flight attendants on DL often assist with lifting bags.

Maybe DL allows their FA's to help lift bags. I am not sure what their policy is nor what their union contract allows for.



A Safe Flight Begins With Quality Maintenance On The Ground.
User currently offlineSeptember11 From United States of America, joined May 2004, 3623 posts, RR: 21
Reply 9, posted (2 years 1 week 21 hours ago) and read 15348 times:

I've seen flight attendants refitting luggages in overhead bins (to create space for more luggages). I think that's their job?


Airliners.net of the Future
User currently offlineGT4EZY From United Kingdom, joined Dec 2007, 1781 posts, RR: 3
Reply 10, posted (2 years 1 week 21 hours ago) and read 15349 times:

Here in the UK, as soon as you find out you are pregnant you stop flying. Some airlines will have you doing a couple of days in the office/crew room up until around 6 weeks before giving birth whilst others just leave you at home. I actually thought crew everywhere stopped flying duties once they were pregnant. Obviously not.


Proud to fly from Manchester!
User currently offlineAirframeAS From United States of America, joined Feb 2004, 14150 posts, RR: 24
Reply 11, posted (2 years 1 week 21 hours ago) and read 15327 times:

Quoting September11 (Reply 9):
I've seen flight attendants refitting luggages in overhead bins (to create space for more luggages).

Re-shifting and lifting are two totally different things, September11.



A Safe Flight Begins With Quality Maintenance On The Ground.
User currently online817Dreamliiner From Montserrat, joined Jul 2008, 2210 posts, RR: 1
Reply 12, posted (2 years 1 week 21 hours ago) and read 15307 times:

Quoting GT4EZY (Reply 10):
I actually thought crew everywhere stopped flying duties once they were pregnant. Obviously not.

I thought this as well, never really knew this actually happens.



Reality be Rent. Synapse, break! Vanishment, This World!
User currently offlineazjubilee From United States of America, joined Apr 2000, 3892 posts, RR: 28
Reply 13, posted (2 years 1 week 20 hours ago) and read 15279 times:

Wow, if you think an FA that is preggers is a big deal you might not want to know that they let pilots fly preggers too! OMG!

User currently onlinegemuser From Australia, joined Nov 2003, 5621 posts, RR: 6
Reply 14, posted (2 years 1 week 20 hours ago) and read 15275 times:

Quoting 817Dreamliiner (Reply 12):
Quoting GT4EZY (Reply 10):
I actually thought crew everywhere stopped flying duties once they were pregnant. Obviously not.

I thought this as well, never really knew this actually happens.

I don't know about other countries, but in Australia that would be a clear case of discrimination, unless the FA's income was maintained at the pre pregnancy level until 6 weeks before the expected due date, when maternity leave provisions start. If you have to maintain their income they may as well fly, unless there is a real health problem, which there shouldn't be with the average healthy woman.

Gemuser



DC23468910;B72172273373G73873H74374475275376377L77W;A319 320321332333343;BAe146;C402;DHC6;F27;L188;MD80MD85
User currently offlineBen175 From Australia, joined Jul 2008, 677 posts, RR: 0
Reply 15, posted (2 years 1 week 20 hours ago) and read 15221 times:

Quoting azjubilee (Reply 13):
Wow, if you think an FA that is preggers is a big deal you might not want to know that they let pilots fly preggers too! OMG!


Excuse me, I said I have no issue with pregnant flight attendants as long as they are capable with doing their job, which this certain flight attendant was not.


User currently offlineDeltaMD90 From United States of America, joined Apr 2008, 7832 posts, RR: 52
Reply 16, posted (2 years 1 week 20 hours ago) and read 15161 times:

I can see the concern regarding safety with pregnant flight attendants, but the reality is, they really don't have to be supermen/women, their biggest role in an emergency is ushering passengers out which can be done during pregnancy. I'd be more concerned with the women giving birth in flight   


Ironically I have never flown a Delta MD-90 :)
User currently offlinelightsaber From United States of America, joined Jan 2005, 12903 posts, RR: 100
Reply 17, posted (2 years 1 week 20 hours ago) and read 15080 times:
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Good for the airlines letting these women fly. Besides not lifting a bag, did they not do anything else?

"Not do anything" is a SERIOUS accusation. Were you stiffed the FULL can of Coke? Did a F/A fall short in the safety briefing? Was one of the F/As rude? (Unlikely with a pregnant women)

Quoting Ben175 (Reply 15):
I said I have no issue with pregnant flight attendants as long as they are capable with doing their job, which this certain flight attendant was not.

How? Not lifting a bag is standard policy; Get used to it. What other aspect of their job were they not fully up to standard?

I personally like pregnant flight attendants. They bring cheer to the cabin.

Quoting tdscanuck (Reply 6):
That may be company policy for liability or health insurance reasons, rather than her choice. But, as noted, lifting bags isn't their job anyway.

I know you don't, but what is it with some who think a F/A's job is to lift bags all day? I happily lift bags for other passengers.

Quoting gemuser (Reply 14):
If you have to maintain their income they may as well fly, unless there is a real health problem, which there shouldn't be with the average healthy woman.

Exactly. If they require bed rest, that is disability and their doctor had better only 'prescribe' that if it warrants. Note: I know more women who were on bed rest than not; the cost of pregnancy after age 40. But otherwise, let them fly about doing their job. As I pointed out before, a pregnant woman brings joy.


Lightsaber



Societies that achieve a critical mass of ideas achieve self sustaining growth; others stagnate.
User currently offlineBen175 From Australia, joined Jul 2008, 677 posts, RR: 0
Reply 18, posted (2 years 1 week 20 hours ago) and read 15025 times:

Quoting lightsaber (Reply 17):
Good for the airlines letting these women fly. Besides not lifting a bag, did they not do anything else? What other aspect of their job were they not fully up to standard?

See my reply below:

Quoting Ben175 (Reply 4):
I probably should have included more examples, she made passengers pour their own coffee (saying she couldn't lean over), refused to help clean up a split drink and a broken glass and pretty much resisted anything a passenger asked her to do, either simply declining the offer or making another FA do it.
Quoting lightsaber (Reply 17):
I personally like pregnant flight attendants. They bring cheer to the cabin.

So many people are taking what I said the wrong way - I have NO issue with pregnant flight attendants IF they are capable of doing the job they are paid to do - help, assist and look after the passengers. But she simply used her pregnancy as an excuse not to do anything, including cleaning up broken glass on the cabin floor. What makes it worse is she was clearly tired and didn't crack a smile the entire flight.

[Edited 2012-07-22 19:05:50]

User currently offlinem11stephen From United States of America, joined Aug 2008, 1247 posts, RR: 1
Reply 19, posted (2 years 1 week 19 hours ago) and read 14948 times:

Quoting AirframeAS (Reply 2):
In general, it is not their job. At the airline I work for, FA's are prohibited from lifting bags and putting them in the overhead bins. It is a safety issue. It keeps OJI costs down and it is also a union work rule as well in which I do agree with. And no, I am not a FA.

If an F/A can't lift a bag weighing maybe 30lbs into the overhead for fear of injury than why should I have any confidence in their ability to; subdue a terrorist, operate slides and rafts weighing close to a hundred pounds, lift over-wing window exits weighing 40-50lbs, etc.? Will they suddenly posses super-human strength and be immune to injury when a crisis occurs? It's ludicrous for F/As to think that they can constantly bang on about their 'vital' safety roles yet refuse to exert the most basic physical force on rather simple tasks and expect people to respect their roles.



My opinions, statements, etc. are my own and do not have any association with those of any employer.
User currently offlineAirframeAS From United States of America, joined Feb 2004, 14150 posts, RR: 24
Reply 20, posted (2 years 1 week 18 hours ago) and read 14784 times:

Quoting m11stephen (Reply 19):

I think you are missing the entire point and I will say it again: At my company, it is AGAINST company policy to lift carry on bags and put them in the overhead bins. The reason for this is because of the increase of OJI's. What causes this OJI is how much a pax puts in their carry on bags. If it is too heavy, that FA could put his or her back out, and could also pose a fall hazard. Once that happens before a flight takes off, your flight will be canceled.

I am sure that other airlines have similar policy as well. It is what it is: company policy.



A Safe Flight Begins With Quality Maintenance On The Ground.
User currently offlineMD11Engineer From Germany, joined Oct 2003, 13968 posts, RR: 63
Reply 21, posted (2 years 1 week 17 hours ago) and read 14769 times:

Quoting gemuser (Reply 14):
Quoting 817Dreamliiner (Reply 12):
Quoting GT4EZY (Reply 10):
I actually thought crew everywhere stopped flying duties once they were pregnant. Obviously not.

I thought this as well, never really knew this actually happens.

I don't know about other countries, but in Australia that would be a clear case of discrimination, unless the FA's income was maintained at the pre pregnancy level until 6 weeks before the expected due date, when maternity leave provisions start. If you have to maintain their income they may as well fly, unless there is a real health problem, which there shouldn't be with the average healthy woman.

Gemuser

Since flight crews are exposed to higher doses of radiation than most "pedestrians", it makes sense to take them off flight duty for the time of their pregnancy until maternity leave kicks in (in Germany minimum 6 weeks before expected delivery until IIRC 2 months after, but if there are medical conditions, she can stay at home at full pay earlier). Here most get transfered to ground duties (office, check-in) as soon as they know (and inform their boss) about being pregnant.
Back in the 60s my mother, who at this time was working as a nurse in a radiological department of a hospital was transfered to another department with less exposure to radiation when she became pregnant with me.
Obviously the salary stays the same.

Jan


User currently offlineBMI727 From United States of America, joined Feb 2009, 15719 posts, RR: 26
Reply 22, posted (2 years 1 week 17 hours ago) and read 14760 times:

Quoting MD11Engineer (Reply 21):
Since flight crews are exposed to higher doses of radiation than most "pedestrians", it makes sense to take them off flight duty for the time of their pregnancy until maternity leave kicks in (in Germany minimum 6 weeks before expected delivery until IIRC 2 months after, but if there are medical conditions, she can stay at home at full pay earlier). Here most get transfered to ground duties (office, check-in) as soon as they know (and inform their boss) about being pregnant.

Avoiding the body scanners during pregnancy would probably be a good idea too.



Why do Aerospace Engineering students have to turn things in on time?
User currently offlinemandala499 From Indonesia, joined Aug 2001, 6769 posts, RR: 76
Reply 23, posted (2 years 1 week 17 hours ago) and read 14757 times:

Quoting Ben175 (Reply 4):

I probably should have included more examples, she made passengers pour their own coffee (saying she couldn't lean over), refused to help clean up a split drink and a broken glass and pretty much resisted anything a passenger asked her to do, either simply declining the offer or making another FA do it.

I had that problem with non-pregnant FAs !
Spilt drink from a previous flight? Here's a wet cloth (slapped onto the seat armrest) "here sir, you clean it!"
Serving meals & drinks? The guy on the aisle seat gets the job!
The stuff you experienced, isn't a pregnancy issue, is a personal attitude issue.

BUT, no, lifting bags ain't one of their jobs. Here, the policy is at some airlines: "you put it overhead or under the seat in front, or the ground staff will shove it in the hold".

Quoting GT4EZY (Reply 10):
Here in the UK, as soon as you find out you are pregnant you stop flying. Some airlines will have you doing a couple of days in the office/crew room up until around 6 weeks before giving birth whilst others just leave you at home. I actually thought crew everywhere stopped flying duties once they were pregnant. Obviously not.

Same here. Report pregnant and you stop flying. If you're a permanent staff, take a 6 month basic salary (not big) and go home, or take continue your salary + other pays based on an agreed number of equivalent flying hours) and and get bigger pay until you can't work then the pay stops. If you're on contract, it's bye bye... however a lot won't report being pregnant until about 3-4 months because of this (but it's always best to check with the doctor).

Mandala499



When losing situational awareness, pray Cumulus Granitus isn't nearby !
User currently offlineStarlionblue From Greenland, joined Feb 2004, 17002 posts, RR: 67
Reply 24, posted (2 years 1 week 14 hours ago) and read 14663 times:

Bottom line:

Quoting mandala499 (Reply 23):
The stuff you experienced, isn't a pregnancy issue, is a personal attitude issue.

Quite. And I find it a astounding how many have jumped down the OP's throat for his comments. He has said repeatedly he doesn't care if she is pregnant. His problem was with her obviously terrible attitude, of which he gave several examples.

Flight attendants on many airlines are routinely rude, lazy and just plain annoying. Someone should remind them they work in a service industry. Now I'm not demanding SQ level service every flight (though if they can do it, why can't everyone else?), but a smile and a less snarky attitude would be nice.

I've flown in the US and Europe for hundreds of flights. I detested the average service level. After having moved to East Asia flying (and check-in, and security, and passport control) is no longer one long source of irritation.

Quoting lightsaber (Reply 17):
Was one of the F/As rude? (Unlikely with a pregnant women)

Pregnant/non-pregnant status has no bearing on whether a person is rude or not.

[Edited 2012-07-23 01:20:01]


"There are no stupid questions, but there are a lot of inquisitive idiots."
25 tdscanuck : I think the triggering line was: That pretty clearly, at least to me, seems to link the OP's opinion of her performance to her status as pregnant, bu
26 Starlionblue : Fair point Tom. He should have added some clarification in the initial post.
27 Post contains images DeltaL1011man : Most stay till they *have* to go because they don't have light duty. I do believe Delta will at least try to find someone a job doing paper work and
28 rfields5421 : Several years ago, a six month pregnant US Navy pilot ditched a T-39 - Rockwell Sabreliner twin engine biz jet type - in the South China Sea. After a
29 Ben175 : I'm sorry if people misread my original post. I should have broken up the two sentences - I was shocked with her individual performance and just gene
30 Viscount724 : BA has one of the most liberal carry-on weight limits (51 lbs.) but they make it clear in their website that the passenger must be able to lift it in
31 PHX787 : Quite understandable, nothing offensive said there.
32 bueb0g : I think you are missing the point. It's all well and good if they would be able to lift a bag, but are forbidden; however, if they are physically inc
33 saleya22R : One should understand the bigger picture. Most pregnant women are able to lift the bags in the overhead bins safely without effort. That’s not the p
34 AirframeAS : Are you that naive?! You cannot argue against company policy and union work rules. If they state that FA's are not allowed to, by company policy AND
35 Post contains images DocLightning : I think that it's important to realize that pregnancy is a physiologic state. It is NOT a PATHOphysiologic state. To re-state it in plain English, it
36 Post contains links saleya22R : Correct. Keep in mind that with regard to the radiation, early pregnancy is the most sensitive period. That's when the organs develop. An old rule of
37 bueb0g : Jesus, maybe try reading what I write before getting hot and bothered? I wasn't arguing against the union rules. You'll notice that I said that if th
38 Starlionblue : I'm sorry but I don't agree with the argument. My wife could lift a very heavy bag while pregnant. She's a very strong woman. On the other hand many
39 AirframeAS : Thank you, Starlion.... that is exactly what I meant. Some people think that FA's are more like slaves than safety figures. I don't understand where
40 JQflightie : its as simple as this, if its to heavy for you to put in the over head locked un-assisted, then it shouldnt be on-board the aircraft, im a flight att
41 DeltaL1011man : Again. life or death my guess is most can lift 50lbs to save there life and its not so much an issue of can they, its more of covering the companies
42 AirframeAS : Not an FA task. The FAR's state that there must be at least 1 person on each side of the aircraft, per exit row, sitting there in case an emergency d
43 david21487 : Which FAR's are you reading that state overwing exit row seats must be occupied?
44 Quokkas : A lot of argument has occurred over bags being too heavy, yet Ben's initial reference to a bag was that the owner was too short to reach, not that the
45 Starlionblue : Fair point. But there is typically a step on the side of the seat row for the purpose of helping short people reach. I also think that, as has been m
46 AirframeAS : FAR 121.585
47 bond007 : I don't see where that says that somebody MUST be sitting in the exit row. Just if there is, they have to be capable. After all, what happens if you
48 david21487 : There's nothing in any FAR that says exit rows, overwing or otherwise, must be occupied. There may be airline-specific policies regarding it, but it'
49 FlySSC : At Air France, as soon as the pregnancy is declared (even 3 or 4 weeks), F/A are not allowed to fly anymore. They can get a job on the ground if they
50 Post contains images DeltaL1011man : Have a ramper come load the bag or gate check it. (or ask someone who isn't a F/A to help.) like it or not its all about money.
51 AirframeAS : At UA, that is exactly what we do. But the CSA has to bag tag it first before we take it down and put it in the pit. The annoying thing is that custo
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