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Quick Turnaround Limit Vs Recommended Brake Coolin  
User currently offlinesmartt1982 From United Kingdom, joined Nov 2007, 225 posts, RR: 0
Posted (2 years 2 months 1 week 5 days 17 hours ago) and read 5124 times:

Hi,

I seem to be getting myself confused between the two. From my understanding the "Quick Turnaround Limit" is that if you are over this weight when you land you need to wait a specified time to check the fuse plugs have not melted before commencing another take off.

The "Recommended Brake Cooling Schedule" is to avoid brake overheat and fuse plug problems that could result
from repeated landings at short time intervals or a rejected takeoff.

What is the differnce between them?

6 replies: All unread, jump to last
 
User currently offlineCM From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 1, posted (2 years 2 months 1 week 5 days 17 hours ago) and read 5117 times:

Quoting smartt1982 (Thread starter):
What is the differnce between them?

I think you have assessed the purpose of the two documents correctly, although most new aircraft are equipped with BTMS (brake temp monitoring systems), which make the used of such schedules and limits somewhat outdated. BTMS offers real-time temperatures from the heat stack, which then can be compared to the dispatch limits for brake temp contained in the AFM.


User currently offlinetdscanuck From Canada, joined Jan 2006, 12709 posts, RR: 80
Reply 2, posted (2 years 2 months 1 week 5 days 10 hours ago) and read 5038 times:

Quoting smartt1982 (Thread starter):
From my understanding the "Quick Turnaround Limit" is that if you are over this weight when you land you need to wait a specified time to check the fuse plugs have not melted before commencing another take off.

It's not so much that you'll hit fuse plug melt just by landing above the quick turnaround limit. However, if you're above the limit you run the risk of the brakes not cooling down enough during a maximum rate ("quick") turnaround and you'll have to wait extra time to get the brake temperature down to where you've got adequate capacity for the next taxi/takeoff. If you're below the limit then you have reasonable confidence that you're brakes will be ready to go when you are.

Tom.


User currently offlineHAWK21M From India, joined Jan 2001, 31702 posts, RR: 56
Reply 3, posted (2 years 2 months 1 week 5 days ago) and read 4913 times:

Apart from Hard braking,contributer is fast taxying too .....  


Think of the brighter side!
User currently offlineboeingfixer From Canada, joined Jul 2005, 534 posts, RR: 0
Reply 4, posted (2 years 2 months 1 week 4 days 22 hours ago) and read 4870 times:

Quoting HAWK21M (Reply 3):
Apart from Hard braking,contributer is fast taxying too .....

I've actually found that fast taxiing with intermittent application of the brakes to control your speed results in cooler brakes when compared to slow taxiing when one requires almost constant use of the brakes to keep the speed down. This is based on my experience with the B752 and the B722.

As an example, we have 4 or 5 Captains that love to taxi the B752 ultra slow and on average their brakes are much hotter than most other Captains that use the faster taxi with less brake application method.

Cheers,

John



Cheers, John YYC
User currently offlineHAWK21M From India, joined Jan 2001, 31702 posts, RR: 56
Reply 5, posted (2 years 2 months 1 week 3 days 16 hours ago) and read 4699 times:

Quoting boeingfixer (Reply 4):
fast taxiing

Fast taxying heat generated is by the tires & not the brakes........Although frequent brake application can raise the temperature too.....



Think of the brighter side!
User currently offlineboeingfixer From Canada, joined Jul 2005, 534 posts, RR: 0
Reply 6, posted (2 years 2 months 1 week 4 hours ago) and read 4452 times:

Quoting HAWK21M (Reply 5):
Fast taxying heat generated is by the tires & not the brakes........Although frequent brake application can raise the temperature too.....

Actually this has more to do with tire sidewall failure than it does with fuse plug integrity. There is no chart for calculating brake cooling times based on taxi speed alone. You would have to taxi quite a ways at high speed to get the brake temps to rise solely on sidewall flex heating without any brake application. I suspect you would get a sidewall failure before registering any temp rise in the heat pack.

Cheers,

John



Cheers, John YYC
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