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B757 Emergency Exit Sign Question  
User currently offlinehagiograph From United States of America, joined Jun 2011, 9 posts, RR: 0
Posted (1 year 10 months 4 weeks 13 hours ago) and read 3736 times:

As I am finding myself sitting on more jets these days with little more to do than stare blankly off into space I have begun noticing the differences in cabins and their fixtures. Recently on a flight back home on a Delta 757 (if I recall correctly) I noticed the following type of exit sign:



and it looked like it was unlit throughout the flight. All the similar signs to this also looked unlit. Are these simply "electrical" lightbulb-based lights that are activated during an emergency or are they supposed to 'glow' during the entire flight? I know some emergency exit signage in various other places looks like it has some "glow-in-the-dark" capability but this type of light didn't look like that.

18 replies: All unread, jump to last
 
User currently offlineMender From United Kingdom, joined Feb 2004, 240 posts, RR: 0
Reply 1, posted (1 year 10 months 4 weeks 10 hours ago) and read 3736 times:

They are activated by the emergency lighting system and are simple electrical bulbs, not photoluminescent. You can find aircraft with photoluminescent floor path lighting which requires less maintenance than conventional 'bulbs'.

User currently offlinehagiograph From United States of America, joined Jun 2011, 9 posts, RR: 0
Reply 2, posted (1 year 10 months 4 weeks 8 hours ago) and read 3736 times:

Mender, thanks! I was always curious why some signs appear to be "electric lights" or bulbs and some are those little red block "tritium signs" which, if I understand correctly, contain some amount of radioactive material and still others are the photoluminescent type of lighting that charges from incoming light and then glows a long time.

User currently offlineFlyDeltaJets From United States of America, joined Feb 2006, 1887 posts, RR: 2
Reply 3, posted (1 year 10 months 3 weeks 3 days 20 hours ago) and read 3736 times:
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Quoting hagiograph (Reply 2):
if I understand correctly, contain some amount of radioactive material

  
you are correct



The only valid opinions are those based in facts
User currently offline1337Delta764 From United States of America, joined Oct 2005, 6557 posts, RR: 2
Reply 4, posted (1 year 10 months 3 weeks 3 days 6 hours ago) and read 3736 times:

I wonder, which particular aircraft types have tritium signs? I know MD-80s have them, and I think some non-Signature Interior 767s have them as well (the white on red ones). What other aircraft types have them?


The Pink Delta 767-400ER - The most beautiful aircraft in the sky
User currently offlineDalmd88 From United States of America, joined Jul 2000, 2558 posts, RR: 14
Reply 5, posted (1 year 10 months 3 weeks 3 days 4 hours ago) and read 3736 times:

The electric signs and path way lights are powered by dedicated battery packs that are powered on when armed and the aircraft power is lost.

User currently offlineHAWK21M From India, joined Jan 2001, 31684 posts, RR: 56
Reply 6, posted (1 year 10 months 3 weeks 2 days 10 hours ago) and read 3736 times:

Quoting Dalmd88 (Reply 5):
The electric signs and path way lights are powered by dedicated battery packs that are powered on when armed and the aircraft power is lost.

To add they can be switched on if needed too.



Think of the brighter side!
User currently offlinehagiograph From United States of America, joined Jun 2011, 9 posts, RR: 0
Reply 7, posted (1 year 10 months 3 weeks 1 day 7 hours ago) and read 3736 times:

Quoting FlyDeltaJets (Reply 3):

FlyDeltaJets,
I assume that the picture of the one I was looking at is NOT one that contains tritium or radioactive material, correct?


User currently offline1337Delta764 From United States of America, joined Oct 2005, 6557 posts, RR: 2
Reply 8, posted (1 year 10 months 3 weeks 1 day 4 hours ago) and read 3736 times:

Quoting hagiograph (Reply 7):
I assume that the picture of the one I was looking at is NOT one that contains tritium or radioactive material, correct?

No, that one contains incandescent bulbs. I have seen them lit once while we were on the ground at ATL at one point. Typically, tritium signs are white on red, rather than red on white like image you posted.



The Pink Delta 767-400ER - The most beautiful aircraft in the sky
User currently offlineAA737-823 From United States of America, joined Mar 2000, 5844 posts, RR: 11
Reply 9, posted (1 year 10 months 3 weeks 1 day ago) and read 3736 times:

Quoting 1337Delta764 (Reply 4):

I wonder, which particular aircraft types have tritium signs? I know MD-80s have them, and I think some non-Signature Interior 767s have them as well (the white on red ones). What other aircraft types have them?

Some of the late model 737-200's had them, and I think LOTS of the 737-Classics had them, but for the NG, they reverted back to incandescent light bulbs. Evidently all of United's Global Service whiners were getting ankle cancer when they sat in the exit row window seats...........  
Quoting hagiograph (Reply 7):
I assume that the picture of the one I was looking at is NOT one that contains tritium or radioactive material, correct?
Quoting 1337Delta764 (Reply 8):
No, that one contains incandescent bulbs.

Indeed, they're incandescent in that assembly, and much smaller than a pencil eraser. They also burn out a lot, and run at just 6 volts DC. They're seriously tiny- maybe the diameter of the tip of a small headphone plug.


User currently offlinehagiograph From United States of America, joined Jun 2011, 9 posts, RR: 0
Reply 10, posted (1 year 10 months 3 weeks 15 hours ago) and read 3736 times:

Quoting 1337Delta764 (Reply 8):
No, that one contains incandescent bulbs. I have seen them lit once while we were on the ground at ATL at one point. Typically, tritium signs are white on red, rather than red on white like image you posted.
Quoting AA737-823 (Reply 9):
Indeed, they're incandescent in that assembly, and much smaller than a pencil eraser. They also burn out a lot, and run at just 6 volts DC. They're seriously tiny- maybe the diameter of the tip of a small headphone plug.

Thanks!

[Edited 2012-11-13 06:12:02]

User currently offline1337Delta764 From United States of America, joined Oct 2005, 6557 posts, RR: 2
Reply 11, posted (1 year 10 months 3 weeks 12 hours ago) and read 3736 times:

Quoting AA737-823 (Reply 9):
Some of the late model 737-200's had them, and I think LOTS of the 737-Classics had them, but for the NG, they reverted back to incandescent light bulbs. Evidently all of United's Global Service whiners were getting ankle cancer when they sat in the exit row window seats...........

Where are the tritium signs located on 737 Classics? Every 737 Classic I have been on has the same type as that 757 sign in the OP's post.



The Pink Delta 767-400ER - The most beautiful aircraft in the sky
User currently offlineMender From United Kingdom, joined Feb 2004, 240 posts, RR: 0
Reply 12, posted (1 year 10 months 2 weeks 6 days 20 hours ago) and read 3736 times:

Quoting 1337Delta764 (Reply 11):
Where are the tritium signs located on 737 Classics? Every 737 Classic I have been on has the same type as that 757 sign in the OP's post.

I have seen at least one 757 with some tritium signs on the hatracks next to the exits. Why, I've no-idea, but it had incandescent bulb signs in the ceiling as per the OP and small tritium sign in the doorways.

Thinking about it, the aircraft wasn't being operated by the original customer who had specified the aircraft at build. Maybe some of the lavs and galleys had been re-located so that it had the same layout as the rest of the aircraft in their fleet. In this instance it would be easier to install tritium exit signs rather than wiring in new incandescent signs where they hadn't previously been installed.


User currently offlineAA737-823 From United States of America, joined Mar 2000, 5844 posts, RR: 11
Reply 13, posted (1 year 10 months 2 weeks 2 days 5 hours ago) and read 3736 times:

Quoting 1337Delta764 (Reply 11):
Where are the tritium signs located on 737 Classics? Every 737 Classic I have been on has the same type as that 757 sign in the OP's post.

Floor-level guidance signs, I.E., the floor-level signs at the overwing exits, as well as 1R/1L and 2R/2L doors, and the center aft guidance light, mounted to the base of the F/A jumpseat.

Quoting Mender (Reply 12):
I have seen at least one 757 with some tritium signs on the hatracks next to the exits. Why, I've no-idea, but it had incandescent bulb signs in the ceiling as per the OP and small tritium sign in the doorways.

The tritium units last a long time with virtually no maintenance, which compares favorably to the incandescent equivalent, which requires at least one of its 21 bulbs to be replaced pretty dependably at every monthly check.


User currently offlineA36001 From Australia, joined Sep 2012, 185 posts, RR: 0
Reply 14, posted (1 year 10 months 2 weeks 1 day 4 hours ago) and read 3736 times:

Hi all,

Why is the floor lighting red at a exit? Shouldn't this be green, given that green in most parts of natural thinking is a go or safe to go signal. In a dire emergency I would of thought most people would respond better if they see what they normally see. Meaning... red light = no entry - green light = safe to go.

Have a nice day  


User currently offlinetdscanuck From Canada, joined Jan 2006, 12709 posts, RR: 80
Reply 15, posted (1 year 10 months 2 weeks 1 day 2 hours ago) and read 3736 times:

Quoting A36001 (Reply 14):
Why is the floor lighting red at a exit? Shouldn't this be green, given that green in most parts of natural thinking is a go or safe to go signal.

The US used, and still uses, red for exit signs and that carried over into aircraft exit lighting.

The 787 switched over to the international standard green.

Tom.


User currently offlineHAWK21M From India, joined Jan 2001, 31684 posts, RR: 56
Reply 16, posted (1 year 10 months 2 weeks 19 hours ago) and read 3736 times:

Quoting tdscanuck (Reply 15):

The US used, and still uses, red for exit signs and that carried over into aircraft exit lighting.

The 787 switched over to the international standard green.

Whats the US justification for this...Out here its Green.



Think of the brighter side!
User currently offlineFabo From Slovakia, joined Aug 2005, 1219 posts, RR: 1
Reply 17, posted (1 year 10 months 2 weeks 18 hours ago) and read 3736 times:

I once read a good discussion on this, might be here on a-net. IIRC red was deemed as the color that is easiest to notice. Same reason fire engines are usually red, btw.


The light at the end of tunnel turn out to be a lighted sing saying NO EXIT
User currently offlinetdscanuck From Canada, joined Jan 2006, 12709 posts, RR: 80
Reply 18, posted (1 year 10 months 2 weeks 16 hours ago) and read 3736 times:

Quoting HAWK21M (Reply 16):
Whats the US justification for this...

At this point, same reason the US still uses feet/inches/pounds...because they've always done it that way. I have no idea why it started that way. But if you go into any US building the exit signs will almost universally be red; that's just what colour you expect to see for exits here.

The FARs as they currently stand required red for several portions of exit markings (e.g. the word "EXIT" on the door, the arrow showing which way the handle should turn to open the door) and that seems to be carried over into everything exit related.

Quoting HAWK21M (Reply 16):
Out here its Green.

That's true for most of the world, as far as I know.

Quoting Fabo (Reply 17):
I once read a good discussion on this, might be here on a-net.

Here are some good threads:
New Kind Of Exit Sign (by Lucce Sep 23 2011 in Tech Ops)
No Smoking/Fasten Seat Belt Signs On 787? (by 1337Delta764 Jul 30 2010 in Civil Aviation)

And here's a good slate article on the general red vs. green exit issue:
http://www.slate.com/articles/life/s..._word_vs_the_little_green_man.html

And here's the FAA Equivalent Level Of Safety finding for the green exit sign on the 787:
http://rgl.faa.gov/Regulatory_and_Gu...005c242a/$FILE/PS07-0585-CS-10.pdf

Tom.

[Edited 2012-11-20 05:58:32]

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