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Boeing Production Increases And The Orders War  
User currently offlineracercoup From United States of America, joined Jan 2007, 202 posts, RR: 0
Posted (1 year 9 months 2 days 17 hours ago) and read 2821 times:

With current production increases Boeing will be delivering approx 260 or so wide body aircraft per year. 100-777, 120-787 and a 40 or so 767/747.

This is about twice Airbus's annual wide body delivery rate. How long before the A350 can get to comparative delivery rate and how much will the difference mean in terms new orders?

3 replies: All unread, jump to last
 
User currently offlineStitch From United States of America, joined Jul 2005, 30865 posts, RR: 86
Reply 1, posted (1 year 9 months 2 days 16 hours ago) and read 2802 times:
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Quoting racercoup (Thread starter):
How long before the A350 can get to comparative delivery rate and how much will the difference mean in terms new orders?

The latest information I have seen from Airbus is to have the A350 production rate at 7 deliveries per month by 2018. So that would be ~84 a year.

Airbus looks like they just might make their 30 per year delivery rate for the A380 and if they do, hopefully that means they will be able to increase it going forward.

A330 deliveries are 9 per month (108 per annum), I believe, but that rate will likely not be sustainable as orders start to fall.


Boeing continues to give guidance of 10 787 deliveries per month by 2013 and have hinted they may go higher. They will also be delivering already-assembled frames that complete their change incorporation so that will affect the delivery rate on a month-by-month basis. So Boeing could be north of 120 per year starting in 2013.

The 747 program is now at 2 per month (24 per year), but Boeing has given guidance that they may roll that rate back if orders remain very soft.

The 767 program I believe is now at 2 per month (24 per year) and Boeing is not currently planning any increases, though they could push it to 3 per month if demand warranted it.


User currently offlineredflyer From United States of America, joined Feb 2005, 4316 posts, RR: 28
Reply 2, posted (1 year 9 months 2 days 14 hours ago) and read 2775 times:

Quoting Stitch (Reply 1):
The 747 program is now at 2 per month (24 per year), but Boeing has given guidance that they may roll that rate back if orders remain very soft.

Don't want to hijack this thread and turn it into a discussion on the merits of the VLA market, but it would be to their benefit, in my opinion, to increase production (delivered planes are where the revenues are at) and spit them out as fast as the customers can take them. And then shutter the line. With the 777x looming, that market is getting smaller every day and the need for a 747 is diminishing as well.



I'm not a racist...I hate Biden, too.
User currently offlineRoseflyer From United States of America, joined Feb 2004, 9585 posts, RR: 52
Reply 3, posted (1 year 9 months 2 days 13 hours ago) and read 2745 times:

Quoting racercoup (Thread starter):

This is about twice Airbus's annual wide body delivery rate. How long before the A350 can get to comparative delivery rate and how much will the difference mean in terms new orders?

I would be amazed to see Airbus surpass Boeing with 3 product lines competing against 4 product lines, but I think Airbus can catch up. It is somewhat dependent on the A350 catching up to the 787 on orders.

The A330 and 777 are both being delivered at roughly the same production rate and have almost identical backlogs. I'd expect those two models to be roughly even until they finish their production run.

The 787 is projected to go up to 10 airplanes per month and Boeing is indicating it may go higher. The A350 is going to go up to a similar rate. So far the A350 has not caught up in orders with the 787. I personally anticipate it getting many more orders as it enters into production and deliveries start, but I don't see it having enough demand to far exceed 787 production this decade.

That leaves the 747-8 and 767 vs the A380. When the backlogs of the three models are compared, the 747-8 + 767 is similar to the A380.



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