Sponsor Message:
Aviation Technical / Operations Forum
My Starred Topics | Profile | New Topic | Forum Index | Help | Search 
Non-Stop Flight Round The World Longitudinally?  
User currently offlineRussianJet From Belgium, joined Jul 2007, 7719 posts, RR: 21
Posted (1 year 11 months 1 hour ago) and read 3249 times:

Curiosity - has anyone ever made a non-stop, round-the-world flight longitudinally, passing over both the north and south poles?

I am motivated to ask because I know it has been done latitudinally (correct adverb?), and can't readily find anything concrete to suggest a flight has taken place in the manner I suggest. Many people out there are interested in challenges like this, so it seems to me that someone may well have attempted or at least planned such a feat.

Are there any particular challenges beyond the obvious non-stop round-the-world challenges of things like fuel endurance?

Grateful for any info.


✈ Every strike of the hammer is a blow against the enemy. ✈
15 replies: All unread, jump to last
 
User currently offlineflyingturtle From Switzerland, joined Oct 2011, 2579 posts, RR: 14
Reply 1, posted (1 year 11 months ago) and read 3217 times:

Quoting RussianJet (Thread starter):
Are there any particular challenges beyond the obvious non-stop round-the-world challenges of things like fuel endurance?

Landing places, I think.

http://www.gcmap.com/mapui?P=USH+-+PER+-+HRB+-+ACK+-+ush&MS=wls&DU=nm gives you 5600 nm between Ushuaia and Perth.

I assume one would rather land on Midway Atoll than in the middle of Antarctica.


David



Keeping calm is terrorism against those who want to live in fear.
User currently offlinetdscanuck From Canada, joined Jan 2006, 12709 posts, RR: 80
Reply 2, posted (1 year 10 months 4 weeks 1 day 23 hours ago) and read 3194 times:

Quoting RussianJet (Thread starter):
Are there any particular challenges beyond the obvious non-stop round-the-world challenges of things like fuel endurance?

That routing will have bigger ETOPS challenges...that's not really a regulatory hurdle because ETOPS doesn't apply to those types of record flights but you'd want to be a lot more careful about diversion/emergency planning.

Tom.


User currently offlinetimz From United States of America, joined Sep 1999, 6903 posts, RR: 7
Reply 3, posted (1 year 10 months 4 weeks 1 day 23 hours ago) and read 3190 times:

Did USAF ever do a refuelled trip nonstop... I'm guessing not, aside from the well-known B-50 and B-52 trips.

User currently offlineRussianJet From Belgium, joined Jul 2007, 7719 posts, RR: 21
Reply 4, posted (1 year 10 months 4 weeks 1 day 23 hours ago) and read 3179 times:

Quoting flyingturtle (Reply 1):

Landing places, I think.

http://www.gcmap.com/mapui?P=USH+-+PER+-+HRB+-+ACK+-+ush&MS=wls&DU=nm gives you 5600 nm between Ushuaia and Perth.

I assume one would rather land on Midway Atoll than in the middle of Antarctica.
Quoting tdscanuck (Reply 2):
but you'd want to be a lot more careful about diversion/emergency planning.

Is that really such a big problem for a death-defying, record-breaking daredevil? I mean, people are happy to freefall from the edge of space for example....



✈ Every strike of the hammer is a blow against the enemy. ✈
User currently offlinebikerthai From United States of America, joined Apr 2010, 2197 posts, RR: 4
Reply 5, posted (1 year 10 months 4 weeks 1 day 22 hours ago) and read 3142 times:

Of all the non-stop flights around the world . . . which direction did they went? I assumed that they went a certain direction to take into account prevailing wind and rotation of the earth.

So an intermediate challenge would be to go the reverse before you try the poles?

bt



Intelligent seeks knowledge. Enlightened seeks wisdom.
User currently offlinetimz From United States of America, joined Sep 1999, 6903 posts, RR: 7
Reply 6, posted (1 year 10 months 4 weeks 1 day 17 hours ago) and read 2984 times:

Have there only been four nonstop flights round the world? Three eastward and one west?

User currently offlineStarlionblue From Greenland, joined Feb 2004, 17186 posts, RR: 66
Reply 7, posted (1 year 10 months 4 weeks 1 day 16 hours ago) and read 2959 times:

Quoting bikerthai (Reply 5):

Of all the non-stop flights around the world . . . which direction did they went? I assumed that they went a certain direction to take into account prevailing wind and rotation of the earth.

Virgin Global Flyer went eastbound all three times. Voyager went westbound. It really depends on which hemisphere for the winds. Also presumably seasonal.

Quoting timz (Reply 6):
Have there only been four nonstop flights round the world? Three eastward and one west?

Unrefueled you have Rutan Voyager once and Virgin Global Flyer three times. Can't think of any others.

Refueled you have the three B-52s.

[Edited 2013-01-30 18:29:46]


"There are no stupid questions, but there are a lot of inquisitive idiots."
User currently offlineViscount724 From Switzerland, joined Oct 2006, 26021 posts, RR: 22
Reply 8, posted (1 year 10 months 4 weeks 1 day 16 hours ago) and read 2955 times:

It wasn't nonstop but in October 1977 a Pan Am 747SP made a special round-the-world flight over both Poles to commemorate their 50th anniversary. You could purchase tickets on that flight ($3,333 first class, $2,222 economy). Routing was SFO - LHR - CPT- AKL - SFO, passing over the North Pole between SFO and LHR, and over the South Pole between CPT and AKL. Total flight time including the stops just over 54 hours.

Related newspaper item.
http://news.google.com/newspapers?id...th%20anniversary&pg=1973%2C3373450

It's also mentioned in the Wikipedia articles on the 747SP and Pan Am. That flight used the aircraft below., named "Clipper New Horizons" at the time of the flight (it was renamed 4 or 5 times). Note the special "Flight 50" logo on that aircraft referring to that special flight, just behind the Pan Am name in the 1st photo and just over the forward door in the 2nd photo. I think that was the only Pan Am 747SP that made it into the "billboard" livery before they sold their Pacific routes (including their 11 SPs) to United in 1986 in their effort to generate cash and avoid bankruptcy a little longer.


View Large View Medium
Click here for bigger photo!

Photo © Howard Chaloner
View Large View Medium
Click here for bigger photo!

Photo © Richard Vandervord



As mentioned in the news item above, a 707-320C did something similar in 1965 (the newspaper article says it was TWA but it was Flying Tiger). That flight operated HNL-LHR - LIS - EZE - CHC - HNL, passing over the North Pole between HNL and LHR and over the South Pole between EZE and CHC. That flight took about 62 hours including 51 hours in the air.

News item on that flight.
http://news.google.com/newspapers?id...7%20north%20pole&pg=6604%2C3521309


User currently offlinerfields5421 From United States of America, joined Jul 2007, 7607 posts, RR: 32
Reply 9, posted (1 year 10 months 4 weeks 1 day 15 hours ago) and read 2937 times:

Quoting RussianJet (Thread starter):
Are there any particular challenges beyond the obvious non-stop round-the-world challenges of things like fuel endurance?

Flying over the North Pole is challenging - but well documented enough with losses of navigational aids to be an acceptable risk.

Flying over the South Pole is even more challenging and more problems with navigational aids.

The real problem is weather.

The Rutan Voyager flew at an average of 11,000 ft. The GlobalFlyer flew quite a bit higher - Fossett was at 40,000 ft when he diverted to Bournemouth.

Neither aircraft was designed to withstand rough weather conditions. They also both required the assistance of tailwinds - thus why the Rutan Voyager flight and the three GlobalFlyer flights were all eastbound circumnavigations.

A North to South Pole circumnavigation would approach one of the two poles in a poor weather situation. There would be almost no wind assistance.

It is going to require an aircraft with significantly more endurance that the Voyager or GlobalFlyer.


User currently onlineLH707330 From United States of America, joined Jun 2012, 849 posts, RR: 0
Reply 10, posted (1 year 10 months 4 weeks 1 day 10 hours ago) and read 2800 times:

Quoting rfields5421 (Reply 9):

A North to South Pole circumnavigation would approach one of the two poles in a poor weather situation. There would be almost no wind assistance.

If you have to cross the jetstream, then you'd get a knock because you need to crab into the crosswind, unless you want to drift right and then left of course a bit....


User currently offlineflyingturtle From Switzerland, joined Oct 2011, 2579 posts, RR: 14
Reply 11, posted (1 year 10 months 4 weeks 1 day 10 hours ago) and read 2794 times:

Quoting Starlionblue (Reply 7):
Refueled you have the three B-52s.

...and one B-50: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lucky_Lady_II . One of the B-52s that made it was the Lucky Lady III. Lucky Lady I was a B-29 that made an eight-stop round the world trip.

And there has a training bombing run in 1995 where B-1s dropped ordnance on three ranges while completing a nonstop round the world flight: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Coronet_Bat


David



Keeping calm is terrorism against those who want to live in fear.
User currently offlinetimz From United States of America, joined Sep 1999, 6903 posts, RR: 7
Reply 12, posted (1 year 10 months 4 weeks 23 hours ago) and read 2634 times:

Quoting rfields5421 (Reply 9):
thus why the Rutan Voyager flight and the three GlobalFlyer flights were all eastbound circumnavigations.
Quoting Starlionblue (Reply 7):
Voyager went westbound.

Anyone else think Voyager went eastward?


User currently offlinerfields5421 From United States of America, joined Jul 2007, 7607 posts, RR: 32
Reply 13, posted (1 year 10 months 4 weeks 23 hours ago) and read 2624 times:

Sorry, wasn't thinking clearly when I wrote that.

User currently offlineStarlionblue From Greenland, joined Feb 2004, 17186 posts, RR: 66
Reply 14, posted (1 year 10 months 4 weeks 17 hours ago) and read 2531 times:

Quoting timz (Reply 12):
Quoting rfields5421 (Reply 9):
thus why the Rutan Voyager flight and the three GlobalFlyer flights were all eastbound circumnavigations.
Quoting Starlionblue (Reply 7):
Voyager went westbound.

Anyone else think Voyager went eastward?

I thought so too. But I looked it up and all the maps show the course to be westbound. Given the nature of the Intertubes, It could all be lies of course.  http://makingmaps.files.wordpress.com/2007/04/voyager_med.jpg



"There are no stupid questions, but there are a lot of inquisitive idiots."
User currently offlineMrBuzzcut From United States of America, joined Jan 2008, 66 posts, RR: 0
Reply 15, posted (1 year 10 months 4 weeks 14 hours ago) and read 2490 times:

Quoting flyingturtle (Reply 1):
I assume one would rather land on Midway Atoll than in the middle of Antarctica.

Midway is at the height of albatross nesting season right now, so I'll call it a toss-up
  


Top Of Page
Forum Index

Reply To This Topic Non-Stop Flight Round The World Longitudinally?
Username:
No username? Sign up now!
Password: 


Forgot Password? Be reminded.
Remember me on this computer (uses cookies)
  • Tech/Ops related posts only!
  • Not Tech/Ops related? Use the other forums
  • No adverts of any kind. This includes web pages.
  • No hostile language or criticizing of others.
  • Do not post copyright protected material.
  • Use relevant and describing topics.
  • Check if your post already been discussed.
  • Check your spelling!
  • DETAILED RULES
Add Images Add SmiliesPosting Help

Please check your spelling (press "Check Spelling" above)


Similar topics:More similar topics...
Longest Non-stop Flight For An A310 posted Tue Mar 28 2006 07:56:28 by CYEGsTankers
The Definition Of Non-Stop -VS- Direct posted Fri Nov 16 2007 11:39:49 by BP1
Aircraft Tyres Manufacturers In The World posted Wed Dec 19 2012 05:12:37 by Tupolev160
707s Non Stop Services Europe > Jo'Burg 1971-75 Q. posted Sun Sep 30 2012 12:05:43 by dennys
Heaviest Configured 77W In The World posted Mon Aug 13 2012 02:33:15 by NZ107
Identify This! Airports Of The World. posted Thu Jun 14 2012 11:41:17 by TupolevTu154
Airports With Worst Runway Condition In The World posted Fri Feb 17 2012 07:29:51 by Tupolev160
Can A BBJ Do JNB - JFK Non-stop posted Thu Jan 19 2012 17:15:36 by BreninTW
Largest Int'l Airport In The World? posted Fri Jan 6 2012 09:55:55 by September11
3D Printing: The World's First Printed Plane posted Wed Jul 27 2011 20:22:44 by rwessel

Sponsor Message:
Printer friendly format