Sponsor Message:
Aviation Technical / Operations Forum
My Starred Topics | Profile | New Topic | Forum Index | Help | Search 
Is The Cargo Area In The A330F Unpressurized?  
User currently offlineDIJKKIJK From France, joined Jul 2003, 1822 posts, RR: 4
Posted (1 year 8 months 1 week 1 day 1 hour ago) and read 5989 times:


View Large View Medium
Click here for bigger photo!

Photo © Tamas Martenyi



This photo got me thinking. The door between the cargo area and the front cockpit/galley area in the A330F seems to be quite thick. Is this because it is a pressurization door? Does this mean that the cargo area is unpressurized? I always thought that the cargo area is pressurized on modern freighters.


Never argue with idiots. They will bring you down to their level, and beat you with experience.
16 replies: All unread, jump to last
 
User currently offline113312 From United States of America, joined Apr 2005, 576 posts, RR: 1
Reply 1, posted (1 year 8 months 1 week 1 day 1 hour ago) and read 5964 times:

Of course NOT. Does appear to be quite secure though. Probably has more to do with dealing with pressurization failure.

User currently offlineDufo From Slovenia, joined May 1999, 810 posts, RR: 4
Reply 2, posted (1 year 8 months 1 week 22 hours ago) and read 5883 times:

In order to have the cargo compartment properly classified (Class A to F if I am not mistaken), there has to be sufficient isolation from flight deck regarding smoke and fire extinguising capabilities.
Some cargo planes use smoke curtains and newer type (especially ones built as freighters) such doors on the main deck.
Additionally, load has to be restrained by at least 9 G load barrier or net.

[Edited 2013-04-21 13:51:41]


I seriously think I just creamed my pants without any influence from any outside variables.
User currently offlineTWA772LR From United States of America, joined Nov 2011, 2469 posts, RR: 1
Reply 3, posted (1 year 8 months 1 week 22 hours ago) and read 5877 times:

Then what happens if live cargo or certain pharmaceuticals get shipped on this aircraft? Is there an option to pressurize the hold?


A landing EVERYONE can walk away from, is a good landing.
User currently offlineDufo From Slovenia, joined May 1999, 810 posts, RR: 4
Reply 4, posted (1 year 8 months 1 week 22 hours ago) and read 5860 times:

Hold is normally pressurized, you cannot depressurize only certain parts of the aircraft.


I seriously think I just creamed my pants without any influence from any outside variables.
User currently offlineB777LRF From Luxembourg, joined Nov 2008, 1471 posts, RR: 3
Reply 5, posted (1 year 8 months 1 week 21 hours ago) and read 5814 times:

All holds and compartments on the F are pressurised and ventilated the same way as a pax version, including the main-deck. What you see on the picture is the 9G wall, which acts both as a barrier against cargo moving forward in an emergency (hence the thickness) and as a smoke barrier (hence the somewhat elaborate locking mechanism).


From receips and radials over straight pipes to big fans - been there, done that, got the hearing defects to prove
User currently offlinebikerthai From United States of America, joined Apr 2010, 2197 posts, RR: 4
Reply 6, posted (1 year 8 months 6 days 21 hours ago) and read 5364 times:

Quoting B777LRF (Reply 5):
(hence the somewhat elaborate locking mechanism).

If you are referring to the two metal tab in the door (and looks like two more at the bottom of the door), I would guess that is part of the mechanism for transferring load through the door to the sidewall and floor..

Smoke and fire can be handled using compressible silicone seals and gaskets (maybe at the door frame interface).

bt

Make that 5 tabs total and who knows how many tabs on the hinge side.

[Edited 2013-04-22 15:19:16]


Intelligent seeks knowledge. Enlightened seeks wisdom.
User currently offlineAesma From Reunion, joined Nov 2009, 6957 posts, RR: 12
Reply 7, posted (1 year 8 months 5 days 23 hours ago) and read 4994 times:

So when a fire calls for depressurization of the hold and flying at altitude, I guess the crew has to use oxygen masks.


New Technology is the name we give to stuff that doesn't work yet. Douglas Adams
User currently offlineDufo From Slovenia, joined May 1999, 810 posts, RR: 4
Reply 8, posted (1 year 8 months 5 days 21 hours ago) and read 4919 times:

Donning the masks is mandatory for every procedure involving suspected smoke or fire on transport planes I flew so far. Not all dangerous fumes can be seen, felt or smelt.


I seriously think I just creamed my pants without any influence from any outside variables.
User currently offlinebikerthai From United States of America, joined Apr 2010, 2197 posts, RR: 4
Reply 9, posted (1 year 8 months 5 days 7 hours ago) and read 4710 times:

Quoting Aesma (Reply 7):
So when a fire calls for depressurization of the hold and flying at altitude,

Do you mean depressurization or venting? If it is depressurization, I'd be curious to know what mechanism is used.

bt



Intelligent seeks knowledge. Enlightened seeks wisdom.
User currently offlineAesma From Reunion, joined Nov 2009, 6957 posts, RR: 12
Reply 10, posted (1 year 8 months 1 day 23 hours ago) and read 4257 times:

I mean depressurization as in, no oxygen, no fire. Unless what is burning doesn't need oxygen.


New Technology is the name we give to stuff that doesn't work yet. Douglas Adams
User currently offlinebikerthai From United States of America, joined Apr 2010, 2197 posts, RR: 4
Reply 11, posted (1 year 8 months 4 hours ago) and read 4060 times:

When depressurization happens, you want to depressurize both the upper lobe and the lower lobe at the same time to prevent breaking the floor beams. So if you want to depressurize the cargo area, you'll have to know if the pressure bulkhead extends bellow the floor or you'll have to depressurize the whole airplane. In latter case, the partition would be useless as a pressure barrier. Shrug.

I would be interested to see how they deal with the pressure differential in the 747 Dream lifter. I heard that the aft cargo bay is UN-pressurized.

bt



Intelligent seeks knowledge. Enlightened seeks wisdom.
User currently offlinerwessel From United States of America, joined Jan 2007, 2416 posts, RR: 2
Reply 12, posted (1 year 7 months 4 weeks 1 day 23 hours ago) and read 4009 times:
Support Airliners.net - become a First Class Member!

Quoting bikerthai (Reply 11):
I would be interested to see how they deal with the pressure differential in the 747 Dream lifter. I heard that the aft cargo bay is UN-pressurized.

There's a big pressure bulkhead just aft of the (remaining) forward passenger door. Everything forward of that is pressurized as normal.


User currently offlinebikerthai From United States of America, joined Apr 2010, 2197 posts, RR: 4
Reply 13, posted (1 year 7 months 4 weeks 1 day 21 hours ago) and read 3977 times:

Yes,

I wanted to know how the pressure bulkhead is dealt with in the lower lobe.

bt



Intelligent seeks knowledge. Enlightened seeks wisdom.
User currently offlinerwessel From United States of America, joined Jan 2007, 2416 posts, RR: 2
Reply 14, posted (1 year 7 months 4 weeks 1 day 12 hours ago) and read 3881 times:
Support Airliners.net - become a First Class Member!

Quoting bikerthai (Reply 13):
I wanted to know how the pressure bulkhead is dealt with in the lower lobe.

As far as I know, the (one) bulkhead transects the cargo deck as well. Anything else would require reinforcing some of the main deck floor to hold pressure, which would be a much larger structural problem.


User currently offlinebikerthai From United States of America, joined Apr 2010, 2197 posts, RR: 4
Reply 15, posted (1 year 7 months 4 weeks 1 day 6 hours ago) and read 3791 times:

Quoting rwessel (Reply 14):

As far as I know, the (one) bulkhead transects the cargo deck as well.

I'd be interested to see how they did it . . .

Maybe I'll get a chance one day.

bt



Intelligent seeks knowledge. Enlightened seeks wisdom.
User currently offlineHAWK21M From India, joined Jan 2001, 31712 posts, RR: 56
Reply 16, posted (1 year 7 months 4 weeks 1 day 1 hour ago) and read 3735 times:

Its a door that seperates the main deck from the supernumery area and Flight deck,it needs to be sealed to prevent fire from spreading and smoke moving towards the cockpit.


Think of the brighter side!
Top Of Page
Forum Index

Reply To This Topic Is The Cargo Area In The A330F Unpressurized?
Username:
No username? Sign up now!
Password: 


Forgot Password? Be reminded.
Remember me on this computer (uses cookies)
  • Tech/Ops related posts only!
  • Not Tech/Ops related? Use the other forums
  • No adverts of any kind. This includes web pages.
  • No hostile language or criticizing of others.
  • Do not post copyright protected material.
  • Use relevant and describing topics.
  • Check if your post already been discussed.
  • Check your spelling!
  • DETAILED RULES
Add Images Add SmiliesPosting Help

Please check your spelling (press "Check Spelling" above)


Similar topics:More similar topics...
Where Is The Crew Rest Area In A 777? posted Sat Mar 31 2007 06:02:59 by Jawed
Why Is The CVR Area Mike Protruding Out posted Thu Jan 15 2004 13:10:12 by HAWK21M
What Is The Space Above The A380 Cockpit Used For? posted Mon Jan 21 2013 06:03:35 by KaiTak747
What Is The Purpose Of The Yellow Boxes? posted Mon Sep 3 2012 00:22:26 by Irishpower
What Is The "bump" On The Nose Of The BD-700 posted Wed Feb 1 2012 19:13:07 by csturdiv
What Is That Scope On The 787 ZA002 Tail? posted Sun Oct 23 2011 11:52:18 by ferpe
What Is The Purpose Of The Solid Red Window... posted Mon May 16 2011 13:55:20 by timmydasquirrel
What Is This Hump On The 77W? posted Fri Oct 8 2010 15:00:07 by c5load
What Is The Inside The Bump On The FX MD-11 Nose? posted Sat Jun 12 2010 12:49:42 by rktsci
The Panel On The Side Of This 767-What Is It? posted Sat Jun 5 2010 08:54:45 by c5load

Sponsor Message:
Printer friendly format