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How Dangerous Fuel Dumping Is For Area Population  
User currently offlineubeema From France, joined Aug 2012, 18 posts, RR: 0
Posted (10 months 2 weeks 5 days 11 hours ago) and read 5967 times:
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I live in the DFW area and the KL032 engine incident after takeoff on Sunday made me curious as my wife was asking me and I could not answer. Although it is an emergency procedure, are there known negative effects to the population and the environment in the area surrounding the flight path due to fuel dumping? Send me a link to the thread if this was answered before on a.net.

Regards

12 replies: All unread, jump to last
 
User currently offlineoly720man From United Kingdom, joined May 2004, 6698 posts, RR: 11
Reply 1, posted (10 months 2 weeks 5 days 11 hours ago) and read 5921 times:

It's possible that there may be some environmental issues, but less likely to be any individual "human" problems.

http://www.southernstudies.org/2010/...amage-some-blamed-on-bp-spill.html

The hope is that fuel will evaporate and disperse before hitting the ground as an aerosol, but weather conditions will contribute to how well, or not, the fuel evaporates.



wheat and dairy can screw up your brain
User currently offlinePlymSpotter From Spain, joined Jun 2004, 11639 posts, RR: 60
Reply 2, posted (10 months 2 weeks 5 days 11 hours ago) and read 5869 times:

The biggest danger is flying back through your/others own dumped fuel vapor, hence why the dump area is remote and non overlapping circuits are flown.


Dan  



...love is just a camouflage for what resembles rage again...
User currently offlineAR385 From Mexico, joined Nov 2003, 6182 posts, RR: 30
Reply 3, posted (10 months 2 weeks 5 days 11 hours ago) and read 5849 times:
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Environmentally/to humans I think there are no issues. Unless it´s a catastrophic emergency the plane will get to an altitude that will ensure the fuel is dissolved or dispersed when leaving the tanks. In the case of the flight you mention, they actually climbed to a higher altitude to dump fuel.


MGGS
User currently offlinepwm2txlhopper From United States of America, joined Jan 2004, 1324 posts, RR: 1
Reply 4, posted (10 months 2 weeks 5 days 11 hours ago) and read 5808 times:

I'd say virtually none. The fuel dissipates before it ever hits the ground.

Go out in the car on the interstate. Get up to about 80MPH and throw a cup of water out the window. If you watch, it essentially breaks apart into a spray that barley wets the ground. Now imagine flying at several thousand feet at 200+ knots and ejecting fluid into the air. it's going to dissipate into a fine mist instantly. Any trace amounts of almost vaporized fuel is simply going to evaporate before it ever hits ground.


User currently offlinefreakyrat From United States of America, joined Aug 2008, 849 posts, RR: 1
Reply 5, posted (10 months 2 weeks 5 days 11 hours ago) and read 5696 times:
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The plane left a nice fuel vapor trail though. The neatest one that I saw was when I lived in Conroe and a Continental B727-200 leaving IAH developed a hydraulic leak and had to return immediately back to IAH. It flew right over our subdivision at about 1,500 feet maybe lower and since it was close to sunset the fuel lit up behind the plane and looked pretty spectacular.

Last summer I was flying to AMS on United's daily flight out of IAH when we encountered a problem with the Captain's PFD and had to divert to EWR. We started dumping fuel but had to turn east south of the Washington SFRA. I don't think they wanted anyone dumping fuel over DC unless it was an absolute emergency.


User currently offlineStarlionblue From Greenland, joined Feb 2004, 17019 posts, RR: 67
Reply 6, posted (10 months 2 weeks 5 days 8 hours ago) and read 5542 times:

Apart from the aforementioned dispersal, fuel dumping incidents are quite rare. You are extremely unlikely to be on the ground under a fuel dump even once.


"There are no stupid questions, but there are a lot of inquisitive idiots."
User currently offlinewinstonlegthigh From United States of America, joined Nov 2012, 119 posts, RR: 0
Reply 7, posted (10 months 2 weeks 4 days 17 hours ago) and read 5292 times:

Quoting PlymSpotter (Reply 2):

The biggest danger is flying back through your/others own dumped fuel vapor, hence why the dump area is remote and non overlapping circuits are flown.

Has this ever happened? I've heard of the Pan Am Sikorsky S-42, but that was a bit different.

[Edited 2013-10-08 10:22:05]


Never has gravity been so uplifting.
User currently offlineLH707330 From United States of America, joined Jun 2012, 750 posts, RR: 0
Reply 8, posted (10 months 2 weeks 4 days 15 hours ago) and read 5210 times:

Quoting winstonlegthigh (Reply 7):
Has this ever happened? I've heard of the Pan Am Sikorsky S-42, but that was a bit different.

Yeah, that one was due to the flaps being extended and a fuel/air eddy that eventually blew up.


User currently offlinetjwgrr From United States of America, joined Mar 2000, 2434 posts, RR: 3
Reply 9, posted (10 months 2 weeks 3 days 17 hours ago) and read 4903 times:

I remember this incident back in 2010. CO 772 dumped fuel after a hydraulics issue occurred upon departing EWR for NRT:


http://news.blogs.cnn.com/2010/05/09...j-after-hydraulics-problem/?hpt=T2

Supposedly dumped fuel between 3000-5000' Residents complained of fuel smell. Here's the A.net thread:


CO Jet Makes Emergency Landing At EWR 5/9 (by ewrkid May 9 2010 in Civil Aviation)?threadid=4805323&searchid=4806065&s=co+777+dumping+fuel#ID4806065

YouTube video:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XORgDkaV_xk&hd=1



Direct KNOBS, maintain 2700' until established on the localizer, cleared ILS runway 26 left approach.
User currently offlineKELPkid From United States of America, joined Nov 2005, 6370 posts, RR: 3
Reply 10, posted (10 months 2 weeks 3 days 13 hours ago) and read 4768 times:

Quoting tjwgrr (Reply 9):
Supposedly dumped fuel between 3000-5000' Residents complained of fuel smell. Here's the A.net thread:

In New Jersey? Nahhhh...  

Yes, it would probably vaporize before hitting the ground. And raw jet fuel smells rather foul   



Celebrating the birth of KELPkidJR on August 5, 2009 :-)
User currently onlinesccutler From United States of America, joined Jan 2000, 5506 posts, RR: 28
Reply 11, posted (10 months 2 weeks 3 days 7 hours ago) and read 4653 times:

There's a nut-job in Sedona, Arizona who is convinced that bizjets always dump fuel before landing. Clearly, she has not checked on what the fuel costs!

Read it and laugh - or, weep at the knowledge that people this nutty still live among us, and they breed!

http://www.closetheairport.com/



...three miles from BRONS, clear for the ILS one five approach...
User currently offlineStarlionblue From Greenland, joined Feb 2004, 17019 posts, RR: 67
Reply 12, posted (10 months 2 weeks 3 days 5 hours ago) and read 4632 times:

Quoting sccutler (Reply 11):

There's a nut-job in Sedona, Arizona who is convinced that bizjets always dump fuel before landing. Clearly, she has not checked on what the fuel costs!

This belief is unfortunately more common than we would like to think. A friend of mine once heard a guy one a plane explaining condensation on top of the wing with, "that's just the pilots dumping fuel before landing".

Cue the chemtrail nuts...

[Edited 2013-10-09 21:29:50]


"There are no stupid questions, but there are a lot of inquisitive idiots."
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