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Embraer Yoke Inspired By Concorde?  
User currently offlinea380900 From France, joined Dec 2003, 1101 posts, RR: 1
Posted (9 months 2 weeks 4 days 12 hours ago) and read 4584 times:

Looking at this picture:

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Photo © Patrick De Coninck

I wondered whether the Embraer controls had been inspired by the Concorde's. Are the button controls similarly placed?

Also are these commands electrical? On all models? Thanks.

[Edited 2013-10-08 16:09:13]

11 replies: All unread, jump to last
 
User currently offline26point2 From United States of America, joined Mar 2010, 804 posts, RR: 0
Reply 1, posted (9 months 2 weeks 4 days 12 hours ago) and read 4551 times:

2 planes I have flown, the HS-125 Hawker bizjet and AC-690 Rockwell Turbo Commander, also have this yoke configuration. I'm sure there are others.

User currently offlineMax Q From United States of America, joined May 2001, 4359 posts, RR: 19
Reply 2, posted (9 months 2 weeks 4 days 5 hours ago) and read 4417 times:

Quoting 26point2 (Reply 1):


2 planes I have flown, the HS-125 Hawker bizjet and AC-690 Rockwell Turbo Commander, also have this yoke configuration. I'm sure there are others.

Curious how you liked it compared to the traditional yoke, what do you think are the pro's and con's ?



The best contribution to safety is a competent Pilot.
User currently offlinePihero From France, joined Jan 2005, 4389 posts, RR: 76
Reply 3, posted (9 months 2 weeks 4 days 2 hours ago) and read 4363 times:
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Feature hes been here for a long time :
The Bristol Britannia, aka "the whispering Giant"

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Photo © Ian Haskell



and its derivative, the CL44

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Photo © Olafur Sigurdsson



as one can see, the radius of the bank control is very important.
I had the opportunity to fly those in 1977 -8 in Angola, thanks to the crews of the defunct Young Cargo outfit. It needed quite a lot of effort to move and knees and thighs got in the way... which was a bit strange.



Contrail designer
User currently offlineclydenairways From Ireland, joined Jan 2007, 1225 posts, RR: 0
Reply 4, posted (9 months 2 weeks 4 days 1 hour ago) and read 4356 times:

The Trident had the same rams horn yoke too, i suppose you could say apart from the E190 family they were really a British thing.

http://www.airliners.net/photo/Briti.../Hawker-Siddeley-HS-121/1638825/L/

I've heard that they felt very natural to fly, as your hands are probably most comfortable defaulted in that position, but your knees did get in the way on occasion.

http://www.airliners.net/photo/0549603/M/
Concorde


User currently offlineDufo From Slovenia, joined May 1999, 798 posts, RR: 4
Reply 5, posted (9 months 2 weeks 3 days 23 hours ago) and read 4315 times:

Having flown planes with both types of yokes, after a few hours there is no difference. With a conventional yoke, you tend to pull to bank, with horns it's more like pushing the opposite side up. You do bump your legs until you get your position right though.


I seriously think I just creamed my pants without any influence from any outside variables.
User currently offlineTrijetsonly From Germany, joined Jul 2009, 197 posts, RR: 0
Reply 6, posted (9 months 2 weeks 2 days 20 hours ago) and read 3859 times:

And don't forget my bike, which has a similar yoke  
Sorry, joke on yoke...


User currently offlinemusang From United Kingdom, joined Apr 2001, 861 posts, RR: 7
Reply 7, posted (9 months 1 week 6 days 15 hours ago) and read 3444 times:

Interesting observations from the rams-horn flyers. I always thought the main benefit of the design was knee clearance.

Regards - musang


User currently offlinepilotpip From United States of America, joined Sep 2003, 3144 posts, RR: 11
Reply 8, posted (9 months 1 week 4 days 6 hours ago) and read 3181 times:

Quoting clydenairways (Reply 4):
The Trident had the same rams horn yoke too, i suppose you could say apart from the E190 family they were really a British thing.

And the 145, and the 120, and the Phenom. They're going side stick on the new Legacy 450. The Brazilians like them too I guess.

They're really not bad. It's a little awkward to turn left in the right seat and right in the left seat at first because of the pivot point in the Embraers but otherwise you get used to it quickly. It's actually a pretty ergonomic design. Your hands fall into them quite naturally.

And yes, advising your fellow pilot that you are doing a control check is considered better manners than bashing their knees.



DMI
User currently offlinemodesto2 From United States of America, joined Jul 2000, 2786 posts, RR: 5
Reply 9, posted (9 months 1 week 1 day 19 hours ago) and read 2826 times:

I have about 3,000 hours in the E145, and the "ram horns" yoke is comfortable in most flying conditions. It's a bit more challenging in crosswind landing situations when most would argue that a traditional yoke is easier to manage. There were times when the yoke would hit someone's knee in crosswind landings, so keep your head up!

User currently offlineCosmicCruiser From United States of America, joined Feb 2005, 2255 posts, RR: 15
Reply 10, posted (9 months 1 week 11 hours ago) and read 2608 times:

Quoting modesto2 (Reply 9):
It's a bit more challenging in crosswind landing situations when most would argue that a traditional yoke is easier to manage.

When I flew the HS-125 I found that a right x-wind was tougher than a conventional yoke and in a left x-wind easier. Just the leverage that each type gives you.


User currently offlineapfpilot From United States of America, joined Jun 2013, 289 posts, RR: 0
Reply 11, posted (9 months 5 days 18 hours ago) and read 2382 times:

I like the rams horn along with the sidestick I find that it closely matches the natural position of my hands.


Opinions are my own and do not reflect an endorsement or position of my employer.
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