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What Does That Mean?  
User currently offlineVywh From Hong Kong, joined Feb 2002, 283 posts, RR: 0
Posted (12 years 5 months 2 weeks 3 days 1 hour ago) and read 2791 times:

it's a conversation between the ATC and the pilot.Can someone please explain these sentences in detail?

"... climb FL230, cross DKB at FL200 or above"
"... turn right heading 150"
"... turn left by 20° and report that new heading"
"... maintain present heading"

Cheers.


15 replies: All unread, jump to last
 
User currently offlineEGGD From United Kingdom, joined Feb 2001, 12443 posts, RR: 35
Reply 1, posted (12 years 5 months 2 weeks 3 days 1 hour ago) and read 2682 times:

I'm at severe risk of getting flamed here, by some of the 'experts' but here goes..

"climb FL230, cross DKB at FL200 or above", This sentance means for the pilot to increase altitude to 23,000ft (FL230), and to make sure that he crosses DKB, which I believe is a VORTAC, at at least 20,000ft or more (given his assigned altitude he has to make sure he is between 20,000ft and 23,000ft when he crosses the DKB VOR).

"turn right heading 150", now this is where I am at risk of getting flamed. Translate this as make a right turn, to 150 degree's (although I keep thinking that its turn 150 degree's to the right, hehehe Big grin).

"Turn left by 20 degree's and report that new heading", now this probably backs up the last sentance, the pilot is most likely heading 150 degrees (roughly SSE) and the ATC would like him to turn left 20 degrees (which SHOULD be 130 degrees, which is almost exactly South East), and then contact ATCO to tell them their exact heading, which should be 130 degree's or thereabouts.

"maintain present heading", uhhh... keep heading in the same direction as you are currently flying Big grin.

Did I screw up? Are all you experts mad at me?

Dan  Smile


User currently offlineIMissPiedmont From United States of America, joined May 2001, 6281 posts, RR: 34
Reply 2, posted (12 years 5 months 2 weeks 2 days 23 hours ago) and read 2650 times:

Furious! How dare you be correct?  Laugh out loud


Quit calling an airport ramp "Tarmac" and a taxiway "runway".
User currently offlineLeftseat86 From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 3, posted (12 years 5 months 2 weeks 2 days 23 hours ago) and read 2638 times:

You nailed it DAn good job!  Laugh out loud
I would like to think of myself as an "Expert" in this field Big grin


User currently offlineJetguy From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 4, posted (12 years 5 months 2 weeks 2 days 23 hours ago) and read 2620 times:

quick, go take your instrument written before you forget. You nailed it.


User currently offlineNormalSpeed From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 5, posted (12 years 5 months 2 weeks 2 days 23 hours ago) and read 2613 times:



One clarification I would make is that, at least here in the US, "flight level" is not so much an altitude, but a pressure level, since all airplanes set their altimiter to 29.92"hg (or 1013.25mb) over 18,000 feet Mean Sea Level (MSL), rather than the local altimeter setting. So flight levels do not reflect hieght above MSL, unless the local altimeter setting is 29.92" (1013.25mb).



User currently offlineVywh From Hong Kong, joined Feb 2002, 283 posts, RR: 0
Reply 6, posted (12 years 5 months 2 weeks 2 days 14 hours ago) and read 2583 times:

Thanks to you all experts....it's an excellent explanation......I really appreciate it.

Cheers.


User currently offlineXFSUgimpLB41X From United States of America, joined Aug 2000, 4192 posts, RR: 37
Reply 7, posted (12 years 5 months 2 weeks 2 days 14 hours ago) and read 2567 times:

Haha.. i know someone would come on here adding an explaination about the pressure altitude thing.

I was thinking about answering it this mornning. but didnt feel like explaining pressure altitude, knowing i'd get "corrected"... didnt post. Crazy i tell you!



Chicks dig winglets.
User currently offlineNormalSpeed From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 8, posted (12 years 5 months 2 weeks 2 days 3 hours ago) and read 2526 times:



Well, I hope it doesn't seem like I was flaming, because I wasn't. EGGD had it all exactly right except for that one little part. And I thought it was worth mentioning.


User currently offlineEGGD From United Kingdom, joined Feb 2001, 12443 posts, RR: 35
Reply 9, posted (12 years 5 months 2 weeks 2 days 2 hours ago) and read 2519 times:

Thanks NormalSpeed, I didn't know that. I'd just assumed it was altitude (because, thats what I had just assumed as I learnt the basics). Is there much differenciation between the altitude above MSL and the pressure reading?

User currently offlineRalgha From United States of America, joined Nov 1999, 1614 posts, RR: 6
Reply 10, posted (12 years 5 months 2 weeks 2 days ago) and read 2502 times:

Quick! Someone save this thread and put it in a historical archive, I think it's the first time the original question hasn't been answered the same way ten times by ten different people.  Big thumbs up


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User currently offlineNormalSpeed From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 11, posted (12 years 5 months 2 weeks 1 day 19 hours ago) and read 2489 times:



Ok, say you are flying along at FL290, and your altimeter is set at 30.26"hg, rather than 29.92". You can use this formula (at least for inches).

29.92-30.26 = -0.34
-0.34*1000ft = -340ft

So, the actual flight level you should be flying at is 340ft lower than the MSL altitude. Not much, but could make a difference.


User currently offlineIMissPiedmont From United States of America, joined May 2001, 6281 posts, RR: 34
Reply 12, posted (12 years 5 months 2 weeks 1 day 14 hours ago) and read 2467 times:

So true. But if you are flying at 290 with the altimeter set at 3026, you are making a rather large error.


Quit calling an airport ramp "Tarmac" and a taxiway "runway".
User currently offlineNormalSpeed From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 13, posted (12 years 5 months 2 weeks 1 day 14 hours ago) and read 2465 times:

So true. But if you are flying at 290 with the altimeter set at 3026, you are making a rather large error.

Yeah. I sort of thought that was implied.


User currently offlineTs-ior From Tunisia, joined Oct 2001, 3451 posts, RR: 6
Reply 14, posted (12 years 5 months 2 weeks 1 day 3 hours ago) and read 2445 times:


ATC asked the pilot to climb to 23.000 ft Std.
DKB is a VOR and due to traffic the flight had to adjust
his rate of climb so as to cross DKB at or above FL200.
"Turn right hdg 150" : If the acft was flying north,it had
to make a U turn and set course toi the South-East !
After the acft had been established to its new direction
the ATC asked for another 20° by the left !
The heading will be 130° !!!
(If the ATC asked for 20° by the right, the heading
would be 170° !)
The acft had to maintain its course to the East-S-East.



User currently offlineRalgha From United States of America, joined Nov 1999, 1614 posts, RR: 6
Reply 15, posted (12 years 5 months 2 weeks 1 day 1 hour ago) and read 2430 times:

Hmm, thought the question had already been answered......guess we spoiled this thread's potential as a history marker.  Big thumbs up


09 F9 11 02 9D 74 E3 5B D8 41 56 C5 63 56 88 C0
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