Sponsor Message:
Aviation Technical / Operations Forum
My Starred Topics | Profile | New Topic | Forum Index | Help | Search 
Anyone Fly A Homeade Plane?  
User currently offlinePanAm747 From United States of America, joined Feb 2004, 4242 posts, RR: 8
Posted (12 years 5 months 1 week 2 days 7 hours ago) and read 1357 times:

Has anyone ever done it? How much time and money does it require?


Pan Am:The World's Most Experienced Airline - P(oor) S(ailor's) A(irline): San Diego's Hometown Airline-Catch Our Smile!
14 replies: All unread, jump to last
 
User currently offlineILOVEA340 From United States of America, joined Oct 1999, 2100 posts, RR: 4
Reply 1, posted (12 years 5 months 1 week 2 days 6 hours ago) and read 1306 times:

My dad is thinking about the RV-8. As far as I can tell its the best in its class. For this one with quich build option expect to have a total with a new Lycoming IO-360 engine and all tools and instruments of around $65,000 About 5-8k less with a refurb engine. There are kits which are much cheaper but the RV-8 makes up for its extra price with preformance.

the have a great website at: http://www.vansaircraft.com

200kt cruise 220kt max
1000 sm range at cruse with 42 gallons
780 lbs useful load (one of the highest for any 2 seat kitplane)


User currently offlineHAL From United States of America, joined Jan 2002, 2561 posts, RR: 53
Reply 2, posted (12 years 5 months 1 week 2 days 6 hours ago) and read 1297 times:

That's a little like asking 'how much does a car cost?'

You can buy just the plans and parts, then build a tiny one seater with a used engine and minimal instruments for under $10,000 and a few months of your time. For that you can putter around your local area in the daytime and good weather and have a ball.

On the other hand, you can buy a kit plane like the Pressurized Lancair IV with carbon fiber structure, a brand new twin-turbo 350 h.p. engine, and the most modern liquid crystal display screen instruments, spend upwards of $300,000 to $400,000 and take every free moment of your life for two to three years to build it. It'll fly at over 300 knots at 29,000 feet, require advanced piloting skills, and get you from coast to coast in one day.

Each one has it's good and bad points. What you decide to build should be based on your ability, your budget, and what you want the airplane for. If you just want to take friends over the town for a day, the Lancair will eat your budget up faster than you can believe. But if you want (or need) to travel far and fast, it's just the ticket. Same can be said for almost any homebuilt.

I think there are over 500 different kits and plans available. If you're seriously interested, the best place to start is the EAA (Experimental Aviation Association), the big homebuilders association. They can answer any questions you have, and help you with advice and almost anything else you might need.

HAL



One smooth landing is skill. Two in a row is luck. Three in a row and someone is lying.
User currently offlinePPGMD From United States of America, joined Sep 2001, 2453 posts, RR: 0
Reply 3, posted (12 years 5 months 1 week 2 days 2 hours ago) and read 1282 times:

Order a copy of the Aviation Spruce and Specilaty catalog. They have a list of the popular homebuilts.

An RV-8 costs $23,000 for the kit plus another $20,000 for the engine. Factor in $5,000 for instruments (Day VFR), the best guess would be about $50,000 certified.

Or there is the Sonex which you can build for about $20,000.

Finally there is the Lancair solution that you can build like the previous said above. The costs all depends on the type of aircraft that you want and the options that you choose.

Here are a couple of sites to visit
http://www.sonex-ltd.com/costs.html
http://www.aircraftspruce.com/main.html
http://www.vansaircraft.com/
http://www.eaa.org

Also consider visiting Airventure, Sun n Fun, or one of your regional EAA fly-ins. Some have the manufacurs there so you can talk to them, at worst case you can talk to the builders or current pilots.

There are many options only one is right for you at any particular time.



At worst, you screw up and die.
User currently offlineILOVEA340 From United States of America, joined Oct 1999, 2100 posts, RR: 4
Reply 4, posted (12 years 5 months 1 week 1 day 22 hours ago) and read 1261 times:

unfortunetly it is nearly immpossible to build an RV 8 for that price. Also quickbuild costs extra and uless you are either planning on working 10 hours a day on the plane or having the project last for 5-10 years the quickbuild it right for you. It cuts build time from 1600 hours to around 850. Also you will want more than basic IFR (day) instruments especially in a good performing plane like this. Then you have add-ons like nav. lights and prop a good 6k for a good one...

User currently offlineL-188 From United States of America, joined Jul 1999, 29799 posts, RR: 58
Reply 5, posted (12 years 5 months 1 week 1 day 21 hours ago) and read 1260 times:

I would love to spend the $60 bucks and pick up a set of Sport Trainer plans from Wag-Aero.


OBAMA-WORST PRESIDENT EVER....Even SKOORB would be better.
User currently offlineNormalSpeed From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 6, posted (12 years 5 months 1 week 1 day 15 hours ago) and read 1242 times:

I hate to be a kill-joy, but there are several things in aviation that really scare me. One of those is homebuilt aircraft. But hey, if you guys want to take that kind of risk, then I'm not going to stop you.

'Speed


User currently offlinePPGMD From United States of America, joined Sep 2001, 2453 posts, RR: 0
Reply 7, posted (12 years 5 months 1 week 1 day 9 hours ago) and read 1224 times:

Have you ever flown a Cub? If you have those were homebuilt, if you applly current standards.

There are many cases where I will trust a homebuilt before I ever touch a FBO plane.

The best thing is always the rule of thumb, don't fly with anyone that doesn't treat their airplane like a child, whether its certified or home built there are going to be problems.

Normalspeed: Go see how one is built and flies before you comment on it.

The FAA required 25-40hrs of testing on an aircraft before you are allowed to take up passengers, on top of it they are generally just as inspected as a certified airplane.

I have flown many times in expiermental/homebuilt aircraft, they provide the most bang for their owners buck. Everyone I have flown has their own distinctive personallity, even ones of the same model. Some will add spades, have extremely cool instrument panels, and many more options.

Personally I want to start building my own Rihn One Design.



At worst, you screw up and die.
User currently offlineNormalSpeed From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 8, posted (12 years 5 months 1 week 1 day 7 hours ago) and read 1216 times:

I have flown many times in expiermental/homebuilt aircraft, they provide the most bang for their owners buck. Everyone I have flown has their own distinctive personallity, even ones of the same model. Some will add spades, have extremely cool instrument panels, and many more options.

Like I said, If homebuilt airplanes 'float your boat,' then by all means - build and fly as many as you like. I'm just saying that there is a reason why you guys pay an 'arm and a leg' to insure homebuilts (that is if you can get anyone to insure them at all). I think aviation is a science of managing risk. And homebuilt airplanes is just somewhere that I'm not willing to go. But I admire homebuilts for their designs, and I think that they are cool airplanes. But you won't catch me building one. (Too much time away from golf, for one thing!)

The FAA required 25-40hrs of testing on an aircraft before you are allowed to take up passengers

Why do you think that is? You can kill yourself in considerably less time. Is that statement supposed to make me feel more secure?

'Speed


User currently offlinePPGMD From United States of America, joined Sep 2001, 2453 posts, RR: 0
Reply 9, posted (12 years 5 months 1 week 1 day 6 hours ago) and read 1211 times:

God Risk management,

Have a little fun, if risk management had its way the Wright brothers would have stayed on the ground. Lindburgh would have stayed at home, and the Air Force would have been happy to stay sub-sonic.

Why do you think that is? You can kill yourself in considerably less time. Is that statement supposed to make me feel more secure?

You should check out AC-90-89A it outlines all the tests that you have to go though. Its the exact same testing regmine that your Cessnas and Pipers have to do though before they are allowed to fly.

If you check it out, you will see that it isn't just build and go fly. You have to make a detailed record (with photos, and drawings) of your building process. It must be available upon request by the FAA at anytime.

On top of the flying time there are many more hours of ground tests. Last one that I was involved in had about 5 hours of time on the ground, running it up, adjusting the prop, taxing, testing the breaks, and finally expiermenting to how the ground roll will go for the first flight. Finally then did we even start the 25 hrs of flight testing. (25 hrs for certfied engine prop combinations 40 for non certifed)

In fact some of the homebuilt companies are going in the certfied market because they see that the kits for their aircraft are selling so well, why not sell the same thing to the general market that does not have the time to build it.

Do you ever plan to fly a warbird? Many of those are resorted (ie homebuilt) and are certified in the came catgory.



At worst, you screw up and die.
User currently offlineNormalSpeed From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 10, posted (12 years 5 months 1 week 1 day 2 hours ago) and read 1203 times:

PPGMD,

I checked out your profile, and those airplane that you have in your photo albums look beautiful (particularly that turboprop Glasair - I bet that thing really moves!). And if someone offered me a ride in either of those airplanes, I'd gladly accept. However, what I'm talking about is what could be termed "total exposure to risk." It's not likely that anything would happen on my flight. And, it may not be likely that those exact airplanes would be involved in an accident. But overall, homebuilt airplanes are more risky. Therefore, those who choose to fly them regularly expose themselves to greater risk. It's not as if Lindburgh made the dangerous crossing one time, and then decided to do it again, and again, and again, thus tempting fate. And as for breaking the sound barrier, those men were test pilots, knew the risks that they were taking, and accepted them. Some did not survive.

Now, understand that I'm not critical of taking risk. I know that we can not fly without doing so to some degree or another. But when I talk about "managing" risk, I mean not exposing yourself to excessive risk, or assuming risk uneccesarily. And for me, this means not owning and flying a homebuilt airplane.

But, if you are willing to assume the risks, then I say go for it. I'll admire your airplane when you pull it out of your hangar. But I won't be pulling out one of my own. (But I'd fly anywhere gaggle style in my V-Tail Bonanza)

'Speed


User currently offlineL-188 From United States of America, joined Jul 1999, 29799 posts, RR: 58
Reply 11, posted (12 years 5 months 6 days 20 hours ago) and read 1173 times:

Why would anybody in their right mind buy hull insurance on a homebuilt anyway?


OBAMA-WORST PRESIDENT EVER....Even SKOORB would be better.
User currently offlineJetguy From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 12, posted (12 years 5 months 6 days 16 hours ago) and read 1172 times:

My personal experience with homebuilts has been limited to 3 different designs - one of which suffered a structural failure while I was flying it. It had a factory built "experimental" composite propellor and threw a blade, the resulting vibration broke the engine mounts. Luckily, the engine failed and shut down before falling from the airplane or I would have died. As it was, I had to make a forced landing in a cornfield. The airplane had amphibious floats which tangled up in the float braces and when everything was finished moving I was upside-down in a ball of metal and fabric. LUCKILY, I was able to walk a way from it.

Personally, I avoid homebuilts like the plague, although I have to admit that some, like the Lancair can be pretty compelling. (I get to Redmond, OR, where their factory is several times a month and I've been through the factory many times.) My main problem with homebuilts is one of quality control. Unfortuately, the old saying "Beauty is only skin deep" can be applied to many builder's aircraft.

Granted, if you take a proven design and a skilled builder, you will end up with something that is far superior to anything that you can buy out of Wichita. However, there are MANY caveats that you must be aware of...

1. The insurance market on certain high performance models has gotten very resticted recently and some of the companies have pulled out of the market entirely.

2. Builder's liability issues still remain. It was builder's liability issues that all but killed the US light aircraft industry for about 10 years. It took an act of congress to pass laws which limited a manufacturer's liability to a finite period. If you built a homebuilt you are the manufacturer and you have a certain liability if you sell the airplane to another party. Most people find it "legally" safer to turn the airplane into a non-flying static display after they've decide to stop flying it. You see a lot of them donated to museums for the tax write off.

If you want to build one for the pleasure of building one, go for it. A lot of people will find that the investment of time and money are hard to justify. It's been said that if you spend the same amount of time working a second job or working overtime as you would spend building you're dream plane you could buy a good used factory plane. (Me, I would never fly anything I built. Big grin )

Jetguy


User currently offlineDC10Tony From United States of America, joined May 2001, 1012 posts, RR: 0
Reply 13, posted (12 years 5 months 6 days 3 hours ago) and read 1145 times:

"Has anyone ever done it? How much time and money does it require?"

I did it often, when I was a kid, and it doesn't cost much money at all and takes about 2 minutes.

First, get a sheet of loose leaf paper...  Smile


User currently offlinePlanelover From United States of America, joined Dec 2001, 321 posts, RR: 0
Reply 14, posted (12 years 5 months 6 days 2 hours ago) and read 1141 times:

I have a friend who built a Quickie 2. It was a canard, but very odd looking. It had a VW engine too. He is currently building another plane (forget what it is). He has been building this one for quite some time now. Probably around 8 years. Allmost done though. Sorry, I don't know the costs for either plane.
I heard about some guys that put 2 engines in a Mark IV (looks a bit like a LongEze.) Instead of having the regular Lycoming IO360 they put 2 Suzuki (sp?) Swift engines in the same spot. They had counter rotating props--one for each engine. This way, they could turn one engine off and cruse on the other. Pretty cool!
I do love those Lancairs too!
Have fun you all,
PL


Top Of Page
Forum Index

Reply To This Topic Anyone Fly A Homeade Plane?
Username:
No username? Sign up now!
Password: 


Forgot Password? Be reminded.
Remember me on this computer (uses cookies)
  • Tech/Ops related posts only!
  • Not Tech/Ops related? Use the other forums
  • No adverts of any kind. This includes web pages.
  • No hostile language or criticizing of others.
  • Do not post copyright protected material.
  • Use relevant and describing topics.
  • Check if your post already been discussed.
  • Check your spelling!
  • DETAILED RULES
Add Images Add SmiliesPosting Help

Please check your spelling (press "Check Spelling" above)


Similar topics:More similar topics...
Does Anyone Here Fly The Piper Aztec posted Sun Oct 29 2006 03:58:45 by Vio
"Fly-By-Wireless" Concept Plane Flown posted Tue May 16 2006 23:34:32 by Kerberos
How Many Times Can A Pilot Fly A Plane In 1 Day? posted Fri Aug 5 2005 08:42:26 by Palladium
Anyone Ever Fly A Questair Venture? posted Mon Apr 5 2004 03:18:39 by SSTjumbo
"anyone Can Fly" posted Thu Nov 14 2002 20:49:33 by Kay
Whats The Hardest Plane To Fly posted Thu Oct 17 2002 09:08:07 by Trent_800
Vans RV-10, Anyone Know Much About It? posted Sun Dec 10 2006 04:34:45 by ATCT
Anyone Landed At Wrong Airport Or Runway? posted Fri Nov 10 2006 12:33:28 by Redcordes
Buddy Holly Plane Crash posted Tue Nov 7 2006 08:24:07 by Jcavinato
Plane Certification & Manufacture Location posted Thu Oct 26 2006 11:34:43 by Zarniwoop

Sponsor Message:
Printer friendly format