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How Does An Aircraft Turn When Taxiing?  
User currently offlineTrickijedi From United States of America, joined May 2001, 3266 posts, RR: 5
Posted (12 years 3 months 1 week 3 days 11 hours ago) and read 13909 times:

How does a commercial aircraft turn during the taxi phase? Is the yoke used much like a car... or are the rudder pedals used?



Its better to be on the ground wishing you were in the air than be in the air wishing you were on the ground. Fly safe!
11 replies: All unread, jump to last
 
User currently offlineALSF 2 From United States of America, joined Apr 2002, 89 posts, RR: 1
Reply 1, posted (12 years 3 months 1 week 3 days 11 hours ago) and read 13831 times:

Most larger aircraft use a tiller (a knob or handle, usually on the captain side only that rotates the nose wheel).

Cheers...


User currently offline777236ER From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 2, posted (12 years 3 months 1 week 3 days 10 hours ago) and read 13811 times:

Rudder pedals usually give a degree of nose wheel authority.

User currently offlineFlightTest From United States of America, joined Apr 2002, 35 posts, RR: 0
Reply 3, posted (12 years 3 months 1 week 3 days 9 hours ago) and read 13802 times:

There are a couple of ways, both mentioned above. But along with the tiller wheel or rudder pedal steering (the rudder pedals are connected to the nose steering) one can use differential braking and engine power. Example...want to make a tight left turn??? Go hard left on the steering along with the left brake then apply power on the right hand engine (if you're in a multi engine). This works best when the engines are far apart along with the landing gear having a wide stance.

User currently offlineOPNLguy From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 4, posted (12 years 3 months 1 week 3 days 9 hours ago) and read 13787 times:

Over on the left lower sidewall of the cockpit, about where the captain's left knee would be, is the nosewheel tiller...


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User currently offlineFlyingbronco05 From United States of America, joined May 2002, 3840 posts, RR: 2
Reply 5, posted (12 years 3 months 1 week 3 days 8 hours ago) and read 13756 times:

In the C172's, I use the brakes that are on the rudder pedals. For twin props, you also use the brakes but you can assist in turning with different engine speeds.


Never Trust Your Fuel Gauge
User currently offlineSSTjumbo From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 6, posted (12 years 3 months 1 week 3 days 6 hours ago) and read 13731 times:

Can somebody tell me how the tiller is hooked up mechanically to the nosewheel? Thanx

User currently offlineFlightTest From United States of America, joined Apr 2002, 35 posts, RR: 0
Reply 7, posted (12 years 3 months 1 week 3 days 6 hours ago) and read 13736 times:

The only one that I have experience on is the Hawker 800XP bizjets.

The tiller is connected via cables to a hydraulic valve on the nose landing gear that controls the actuator for the steering.


User currently offlineTrickijedi From United States of America, joined May 2001, 3266 posts, RR: 5
Reply 8, posted (12 years 3 months 1 week 2 days 6 hours ago) and read 13642 times:

Thanks for the responses so far...

A couple of more questions:
1) So the yoke is not used at all in the taxi process, is that correct?

2) I'm still a little confused about the function of the rudder pedals during taxiing... are they exclusively used for braking?




Its better to be on the ground wishing you were in the air than be in the air wishing you were on the ground. Fly safe!
User currently offlineBeefmoney From United States of America, joined Oct 2000, 1113 posts, RR: 4
Reply 9, posted (12 years 3 months 1 week 2 days 4 hours ago) and read 13642 times:

On the Cessna 172, the rudder pedals have toe brakes on the top, and if you press on the bottom you are just using the rudder, and no brakes. Just using rudder will give you a few degrees deflection on the nose wheel, because the rudder and nose wheel are inter-connected. If you push on the top as well, the aircraft will turn much tighter, because you are locking up, or nearly so, the wheels on one side of the plane. And no, the yoke is not used at all during taxi, except to help balance the aircraft against the wind.

User currently offlineFlyingbronco05 From United States of America, joined May 2002, 3840 posts, RR: 2
Reply 10, posted (12 years 3 months 1 week 1 day 17 hours ago) and read 13599 times:

you are correct that the yoke plays no role in TURNING. However, you may need to deflect some aileron into the wind to keep a 172 from flipping over on run up.


Never Trust Your Fuel Gauge
User currently offlineBio15 From Colombia, joined Mar 2001, 1089 posts, RR: 7
Reply 11, posted (12 years 3 months 1 week 1 day 10 hours ago) and read 13569 times:

Keeping it simple, the yoke just controls the ailerons and elevator. On airliners, the rudder pedals will be used for brakes (when push with your toes to bring them down) and will also control the rudder deflection along with a little nosewheel steering (when pushing with your heels to displace the pedals back and forth). When taxiing, you will generally need more nosewheel steering than the 7° (not sure, but it's not much) provided by the pedals, so you will use the tiller which has been mentioned. On takeoff, at higher speeds, steering to keep the nosewheel centered can be achieved just with the pedals.
-bio


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