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Best Way To Find Out Your Groundspeed?  
User currently offlineGullfaxi From Iceland, joined Apr 2002, 37 posts, RR: 0
Posted (12 years 7 months 1 day 15 hours ago) and read 8360 times:

What is the safest and fastest way to find your ground speed ?
How can I easily find out which way the wind is blowing ??


16 replies: All unread, jump to last
 
User currently offlineSaintsman From United Kingdom, joined Mar 2002, 2065 posts, RR: 2
Reply 1, posted (12 years 7 months 1 day 15 hours ago) and read 8348 times:

Make the most of technology. A hand held GPS doesn't cost much these days and will give you most of the information you need.

User currently offlineL-188 From United States of America, joined Jul 1999, 29838 posts, RR: 58
Reply 2, posted (12 years 7 months 1 day 15 hours ago) and read 8346 times:

Without spending a lot of cash?

Try routing directly over a highway.

Then slow it down to pace the cars that are on it. Figure 70 mph for freeways.


Ok, you probably don't want to do this in a Citationjet but in a Supercub it workes just fine. Actually you have to speed up.



OBAMA-WORST PRESIDENT EVER....Even SKOORB would be better.
User currently offlineFredT From United Kingdom, joined Feb 2002, 2185 posts, RR: 26
Reply 3, posted (12 years 7 months 1 day 14 hours ago) and read 8331 times:

By using a GPS or an INS as suggested, or by taking your TAS and heading, adding the known wind and calculating the length of the resulting velocity vector.

How to find out which way the wind is blowing? By using a hight-tech gadget called a 'windsock'. Big grin

If you're up in the air, check your drift.

In the good old days they had an instrument specifically intended to check the drift angle. Checking the drift angle on two different headings would enable you to calculate the wind speed and direction.

Cheers,
Fred



I thought I was doing good trying to avoid those airport hotels... and look at me now.
User currently offlinePPGMD From United States of America, joined Sep 2001, 2453 posts, RR: 0
Reply 4, posted (12 years 7 months 1 day 12 hours ago) and read 8315 times:

SuperCub speeding up, how true. I was once going to fly the cub inland a little until I called for briefing, 15kts direct headwind, that would cut down my cruise speed by 25%, oh well faster to drive, but then again with Orlando Traffic, maybe that 45kt cruise ain't that bad.


At worst, you screw up and die.
User currently offlineBio15 From Colombia, joined Mar 2001, 1089 posts, RR: 7
Reply 5, posted (12 years 7 months 1 day 10 hours ago) and read 8300 times:

1)FredT's method is a good one, not so easy as the GPS. You can calculate your drift also using a VOR. If you're heading straight to it, you take a reference distance point, and then let yourself drift for a while and then take another reference point. You will be able to calculate the ground distance flown by the change in radial from the VOR and your change in distance to the VOR (which is not always the same as the ground distance flown). You calculate the resulting vector by knowing it is the addition of your vector with respect to the air (airspeed and heading) plus the vector of the wind (speed and heading as well), and it will be headed in the direction of your drift. Therefore if you have your heading and airspeed, you can find out the windspeed.

2)Or, stick to the GPS.

-bio


User currently offlineWilcharl From United States of America, joined Jun 2000, 1168 posts, RR: 3
Reply 6, posted (12 years 7 months 1 day 6 hours ago) and read 8270 times:

go the handheld route... alota fun in say a cessna 150 to look and see how slow your groundspeed is when your going upwind

User currently offlineXFSUgimpLB41X From United States of America, joined Aug 2000, 4229 posts, RR: 37
Reply 7, posted (12 years 7 months 1 day ago) and read 8240 times:

Then theres the cheapest way to find your groundspeed... all you need is a watch and a map and an E6-B.


Clock yourself between two points on the map.... figure out how far it was, and plot that time/distance on the E6-B. Wherever the big black triangle is pointing at is your groundspeed.

Did that make sense?



Chicks dig winglets.
User currently offlineJkarry From United States of America, joined Nov 2001, 43 posts, RR: 0
Reply 8, posted (12 years 7 months 23 hours ago) and read 8223 times:

just ask ATC what your groundspeed is.

User currently offlineSkyguy11 From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 9, posted (12 years 7 months 22 hours ago) and read 8218 times:

Or see how far you went in a minute and multiply that by 60. This will work better in faster planes, however, because it's kind of hard to distinguish between 1.4nm and 1.6nm.

But if you see how far you go in 6 minutes and multiply it by 10 then you will get a more accurate answer. I prefer to time myself between two predetermined checkpoints, and divide the distance by the time.


User currently offlineGullfaxi From Iceland, joined Apr 2002, 37 posts, RR: 0
Reply 10, posted (12 years 7 months 16 hours ago) and read 8209 times:

That was just what I was looking for !!


User currently offlineKALB From United States of America, joined Mar 2000, 573 posts, RR: 0
Reply 11, posted (12 years 7 months 14 hours ago) and read 8189 times:

If your aircraft is equipped with DME and you are flying inbound/outbound on a VOR-DME radial, it will give you the groundspeed. However, its not accurate when close to the VOR.

User currently offlineDragogoalie From Australia, joined Oct 2001, 1220 posts, RR: 6
Reply 12, posted (12 years 6 months 4 weeks 1 day 16 hours ago) and read 8163 times:

"Then theres the cheapest way to find your groundspeed... all you need is a watch and a map and an E6-B.


Clock yourself between two points on the map.... figure out how far it was, and plot that time/distance on the E6-B. Wherever the big black triangle is pointing at is your groundspeed.

Did that make sense? "


Thats the way I learned....

--dragogoalie-#88--



Formerly known as Jap. Srsly. AUSTRALIA: 2 days!
User currently offlineTurbineBeaver From United States of America, joined Jan 2002, 1199 posts, RR: 0
Reply 13, posted (12 years 6 months 4 weeks 1 day 15 hours ago) and read 8160 times:

The first thing I learned when flying a cross country: calculate groundspeed after every checkpoint. Yeah, we've got the fancy GPSs, but there are easy ways. Find two points on your sectional, measure the distance between, and fly from them, timing it. Then, just plus it into your flight computer or whiz wheel, the distance and the time, and you get your groundspeed. Then, by referencing this to your airspeed, you can get a good sense of the wind.

TB


User currently offlineBio15 From Colombia, joined Mar 2001, 1089 posts, RR: 7
Reply 14, posted (12 years 6 months 4 weeks 1 day 11 hours ago) and read 8145 times:

>>>Then, just plus it into your flight computer or whiz wheel, the distance and the time, and you get your groundspeed

I believe all pilots should be able to NOT use a computer on this one!!!
v*t=d
you know the distance, you know the time, so guess what! The velocity is your distance divided by the time it took you to fly it.
That, you plus it into your brain and give your maths some exercise.

It's just a shame seeing there's nothing to do about the issue of computers dominating aviation, and pilots getting dumber.

-bio


User currently offlineThirtyEcho From United States of America, joined Dec 2001, 1661 posts, RR: 1
Reply 15, posted (12 years 6 months 4 weeks 1 day 5 hours ago) and read 8128 times:

The fastest way to find out groundspeed? Absent a good GPS or DME readout, you can always try "XYZ Center, can you give us a groundspeed?"

User currently offlineSaxman66 From United States of America, joined Sep 2000, 518 posts, RR: 0
Reply 16, posted (12 years 6 months 4 weeks 1 day 3 hours ago) and read 8111 times:

As for wind ask FSS for the winds aloft. Then interpolate that for your altitude. Also the general direction that the wind is at the airport will be about the same in the air. As for WCA (wind correction angle) i use about 5 degrees of correction for every 10 knots of direct crosswind. You just kinda have to mess with it.



Ride Amtrak!
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