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Best Single Engine Aircraft To Train On?  
User currently offlineFly_yhm From Canada, joined Dec 2000, 1681 posts, RR: 10
Posted (12 years 3 months 1 week 3 days 8 hours ago) and read 10725 times:

What is the best aircraft to train on and why?


Where will you spend eternity? He,s more real then you think!!!!!
29 replies: All unread, showing first 25:
 
User currently offlineWietse From Netherlands, joined Oct 2001, 3809 posts, RR: 55
Reply 1, posted (12 years 3 months 1 week 3 days 8 hours ago) and read 10722 times:

Cessna 152, 172, 182, very forgiving airplane


Wietse de Graaf
User currently offlineDufo From Slovenia, joined May 1999, 798 posts, RR: 4
Reply 2, posted (12 years 3 months 1 week 3 days 8 hours ago) and read 10711 times:

Probably the 152 and 172.. why?
very durable landing gear (assumed you don't land nose wheel first)
carb-equipped engine
not many systems to learn
cheap to operate
high wing, conventional tail
pleasing aerodynamics

and so on, I like these two planes!

Jernej



I seriously think I just creamed my pants without any influence from any outside variables.
User currently offlineCosync From Mexico, joined Nov 2001, 556 posts, RR: 0
Reply 3, posted (12 years 3 months 1 week 3 days 7 hours ago) and read 10707 times:

152 is the best.
cheap 2 seats and simple.


User currently offlineWilcharl From United States of America, joined Jun 2000, 1166 posts, RR: 3
Reply 4, posted (12 years 3 months 1 week 3 days 5 hours ago) and read 10699 times:

Im going to throw an arugment up here... that simple is not always best.... the 172 is easeier to fly then the 152 which is less stable and more like a kite... I would argue that its better to learn in less forgiving airplane where you reallly learn how to fly... My thought would be a grumman tiger... Why? Laminar flow wing for one.... castoring nose wheel... very smooth and stable in the air, it has a rudder that you actually have to use... it is solid as a rock with the laminated alumiium honeycomb setup, the wing spar is huge, i have seen one that was in a non fatal accidnet, and all that was left was the cockpit comparrtment... compared to cessna and piper products it is defenity a stronger airplane. it also makes you switch fuel tanks so you learn to manage fuel, the cockpit is very logical and good for instrument work... you have to be right on the #s on landing as it is not nearly as forgiving as a cessna or a piper... the laminar flow wing is fast and gives a very noticible stall...

User currently offlineJetguy From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 5, posted (12 years 3 months 1 week 3 days 4 hours ago) and read 10687 times:

Wilcharl,
You bring up some very valid points. This is precisely the reason why, IMHO, the Cherokee series aren't my first choice in training aircraft - they are too forgiving and can give the neophyte pilot a false sense of security. Not all aircraft in the general aviation fleet are as forgiving.

The fact of the matter is that it doesn't really make any difference. People have learned to fly in just about any type of aircraft imaginable, from gliders to jets. Today, the vast majority of students learn to fly in Cessna 150s, Cessna 172s, Piper Cherokees, Piper Warriors, or Piper Tomahawks. However, there are many other suitable aircraft. There are those who will say that the "high-wing" trainers such as the Cessna 150, 152, or 172 are easier to fly and are more stable. Others will say that the "low-wing" aircraft such as the Pipers are better. The truth is that either type is acceptable. Each type has its particular "pros" and "cons". However, when all is said and done it doesn't really matter.


User currently offlineSunken_Lunken From United States of America, joined Jul 2001, 87 posts, RR: 0
Reply 6, posted (12 years 3 months 1 week 3 days 2 hours ago) and read 10663 times:

I think finding a good flight instructor is far more important than the make and model of plane you fly. Each airplane has its own strengths, weaknesses, advantages, and disadvantages when compared to other planes.

But there is no substitute for good instruction!

Happy Flying!  Big thumbs up


User currently offlineJETPILOT From United States of America, joined May 1999, 3130 posts, RR: 29
Reply 7, posted (12 years 3 months 1 week 3 days 1 hour ago) and read 10654 times:

The best aircraft to train on is one that is safely maintained, available, priced affordably (club rate, wet/Dry), has suitable equipment to the type of training being given/reveived.

As far as which specific manufacturer/type? Toss the coin.

This isn't the Civ Av forum.... the "best" type questions are weak, and broad in scope.

What yo ushould be asking is what are the characteristics of each and from that info you can draw your own conclusions.

JET



User currently offlineNormalSpeed From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 8, posted (12 years 3 months 1 week 3 days 1 hour ago) and read 10650 times:

I'm going to have to vote for the Cessna 172, however, I don't think it really makes much of a difference.

'Speed


User currently offlineFlightSimFreak From United States of America, joined Oct 2000, 720 posts, RR: 0
Reply 9, posted (12 years 3 months 1 week 3 days ago) and read 10642 times:

I have to say the Beech Skipper... It has large control surfaces, so it is very light to the touch, and very precise, especially in crosswind landings. Also, it's slow, so the studen't cannot get behind the airplane. It also is pretty dificult to stall due to the specially designed wing. All in all, I like this aircraft. Soon, though, I will be switching to a Cessna 172 as a post-training aircraft. Any questions about the Skipper are welcome, and no, I have never flown a Tomahawk or any other type of aircraft, so I cannot really compare the Skipper to others.

User currently offlineSllevin From United States of America, joined Jan 2002, 3376 posts, RR: 6
Reply 10, posted (12 years 3 months 1 week 2 days 23 hours ago) and read 10640 times:

I'll argue the case and say that you are best off learning on a tailwheel aircraft. It will really teach and ingrain good flying and rudder skills that are much harder to learn down the road. Besides, they you'll have your tailwheel signoff already...

Steve


User currently offlineJETPILOT From United States of America, joined May 1999, 3130 posts, RR: 29
Reply 11, posted (12 years 3 months 1 week 2 days 23 hours ago) and read 10637 times:

If you really want to name names...... The Tampico shines above all.

JET


User currently offlineWilcharl From United States of America, joined Jun 2000, 1166 posts, RR: 3
Reply 12, posted (12 years 3 months 1 week 2 days 23 hours ago) and read 10631 times:

To the skipper skipper...

where did you find a flgiht school using a skipper? thats been an a/c i always wanted to fly, but no one has it... everyone confuses it for a traumahawk but from what I have read it is a much better designed airplane and has the characteristics and quality feel of its older sisters.

A tampico is another good aircraft, very ergonomic setup, the trim is right by the throttle, so you can jocky the throttle and the trim with one hand without looking... Embry riddle used them as primary trainers priror to the cessna deal...

viva la france


User currently offlineFlightSimFreak From United States of America, joined Oct 2000, 720 posts, RR: 0
Reply 13, posted (12 years 3 months 1 week 2 days 20 hours ago) and read 10611 times:

I was going to write a long reply to that, but A.net didn't like it. I didn't have to look for a flight school that used skippers, the first one I went to did.

User currently offlineWilcharl From United States of America, joined Jun 2000, 1166 posts, RR: 3
Reply 14, posted (12 years 3 months 1 week 2 days 19 hours ago) and read 10605 times:

dang i was hoping for a long reply about how beautiufl of a bird she was to fly oh well

User currently offlinePositive rate From Australia, joined Sep 2001, 2143 posts, RR: 1
Reply 15, posted (12 years 3 months 1 week 2 days 17 hours ago) and read 10594 times:

How about the GB110 Grob- they seem like the perfect trainer. Also the TB10 Tobago is a great a/c- although it may be a bit fast for initial training.

User currently offlineJetguy From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 16, posted (12 years 3 months 1 week 2 days 17 hours ago) and read 10593 times:

Actually, if I were King and could set all of the rules I would make it a requirement for everyone to do their initial training in a glider, then get some taildragger time, then on to whatever else they wanted to fly.


User currently offlineUA752 From United States of America, joined Jan 2001, 142 posts, RR: 2
Reply 17, posted (12 years 3 months 1 week 2 days 16 hours ago) and read 10582 times:

Belanca Citabria...once you can fly a taildragger, you can fly most any nose wheel plane...plus it makes you a real stick and rudder pilot...

User currently offlineJhooper From United States of America, joined Dec 2001, 6204 posts, RR: 12
Reply 18, posted (12 years 3 months 1 week 2 days 16 hours ago) and read 10581 times:

I think we're talking about high-wing vs. low-wing, a non-solvable debate. Anyway, it's a matter of preference, really. And as a new pilot, one probably doesn't have a preference. You'll probably find more high-wings (i.e. C152, C172) to rent. Personally, I'd go with the C152. Some schools will try to sell you on the C172, but it really isn't necessary until you get to the instrument rating (unless you're a big guy). C152s are pretty cost-effective and were really designed for training. Good luck!


Last year 1,944 New Yorkers saw something and said something.
User currently offlineFlightSimFreak From United States of America, joined Oct 2000, 720 posts, RR: 0
Reply 19, posted (12 years 3 months 1 week 1 day 8 hours ago) and read 10552 times:

It was going to be a long reply about what a beutiful bird the skipper is tfly, but A.net didn't take the post... sorry.

User currently offlineCaptaingomes From Canada, joined Feb 2001, 6413 posts, RR: 55
Reply 20, posted (12 years 3 months 1 week 1 day 4 hours ago) and read 10546 times:

fly-yhm, I can only comment on the C152 and C172. The C152 was designed for training purposes mainly. It is a very light aircraft, very forgiving, but it has its limitations. If you are a big guy, and your instructor is a big guy/gal, then you wont like it. You wont be legal to take off with full fuel either on many days. The C152 is like a feather in the wind. Every little thing disturbs it, and it's a matter of you getting disturbed or not.

The C172 is usually about $15 an hour more to rent, but it is much more stable and more forgiving. It is more capable, and more comforting to fly. I started on the C152, and just moved up to the C172, and like it much better.



"it's kind of like an Airbus, it's an engineering marvel, but there's no sense of passion" -- J. Clarkson re: Coxster
User currently offlineLeftseat86 From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 21, posted (12 years 3 months 1 week 1 day 4 hours ago) and read 10541 times:

I've flown the Cherokee 140/160/180, Katana, C152, C150, and C172, and I must say the kite like C150/152 is the better one. It gets blown all over the place in even the slightest crosswind, so you really have to work the controls to get it down.
My personnal favorite would be an AT-6 Texan Big grin


User currently offlineDuff From New Zealand, joined Oct 2001, 117 posts, RR: 1
Reply 22, posted (12 years 3 months 1 week 18 hours ago) and read 10521 times:

After doing my initial training on the C152 then the Tomahawk I would go with the Tommy. Much more challenging to fly and keeps you on your toes.

User currently offlineTAA_Airbus From Australia, joined Nov 1999, 726 posts, RR: 0
Reply 23, posted (12 years 3 months 6 days 21 hours ago) and read 10495 times:

Very personal question!!!!!!!

its like asking a girl if she likes the meat or the motion!!

I'll say a cessna, but Ive never flown a piper, so I cant give a valid answer, and Im sure its the same with most people in here.


User currently offlineFlyingbronco05 From United States of America, joined May 2002, 3840 posts, RR: 2
Reply 24, posted (12 years 3 months 4 days 21 hours ago) and read 10468 times:

The Piper Warrior (IMO) is the easiest to land over the 172. However, i like the 172 in maneuvers (climbing, steep turns) cause u can see below you.


Never Trust Your Fuel Gauge
25 B747skipper : The question for defining the "best" - is "for what purpose"... There are many considerations which many of you dont realize, may I suggest a few thin
26 Captaingomes : Wow skipper, great reply! Fly_yhm, what have you decided you will be doing? Are you flying now? Where are you flying out of?
27 Dragogoalie : I think that training should be done in more than one airplane. I started my training in a Piper Warrior, did about 30 hours in that, and now I'm fini
28 Indianguy : How about the Piper Cub PA-180? Seems pretty decent.
29 MagicMan_841 : I own/train on a 1968 Cessna 150. They're the best trainers around, really simple, built like army tanks. They'll take just about anything and land an
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