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Wing Curve Question  
User currently offlineBruce From United States of America, joined May 1999, 5059 posts, RR: 15
Posted (12 years 3 months 1 week 5 days 3 hours ago) and read 1966 times:

Hopefully this wont sound like a dumb question......but why do jets' wings curve down where they meet the fuselage? I notice this on 737/757/767/MD11 and some others...here's a good example - a photo of mine that was rejected (but I'm working on fixing it)

http://airliners.net/procphotos/rejphoto.main?filename=N383DN_rear_3.jpg

How does this curvature improve lift instead of having a "straight" wing like the DC9s and some others have?

bruce


Bruce Leibowitz - Jackson, MS (KJAN) - Canon 50D/100-400L IS lens
6 replies: All unread, jump to last
 
User currently offlineZiggy From United States of America, joined Jun 2001, 178 posts, RR: 0
Reply 1, posted (12 years 3 months 1 week 5 days 2 hours ago) and read 1941 times:

The curvature is to provide greater amount of lift. With lift comes stress; So the closer to the wing root you get the more stress the wing can handle and the farther the less.

I can go farther into detail if you wish.

Ziggy  Smile


User currently offlineFredT From United Kingdom, joined Feb 2002, 2185 posts, RR: 26
Reply 2, posted (12 years 3 months 1 week 4 days 20 hours ago) and read 1909 times:

To get the ideal wing efficiency, you aim for elliptical lift distribution.

However, you often twist the wing slightly to give the root a higher angle of attack in order to make the root stall first. If the wingtip stalls first, the roll moments caused by assymetrical stalls are great and to make matters worse, the ailerons are out there in the separated airflow reducing your ability to correct.

It is quite possible that there are further reasons, those swept wings tend to make a big mess out of things you think you know and I'm still getting surprised every now and then when dealing with aerodynamics I have no direct previous experience of..  Smile

Cheers,
Fred



I thought I was doing good trying to avoid those airport hotels... and look at me now.
User currently offlineBroke From United States of America, joined Apr 2002, 1322 posts, RR: 3
Reply 3, posted (12 years 3 months 1 week 4 days 18 hours ago) and read 1907 times:

The trailing edge of all wings have some curvature downwards along the trailing edge (TE). Supersonic and aerobatics wing sections would not show as much as other wings. When designing the wing section along the wing fuselage junction, you have to take into effect the resulting additional drag that the junction causes. The cleanest junction is one where the wing in perpendicular to the fuselage, but this is only possible on a mid-wing design. The Aerostar and the Jet Commander are examples of a mid wing. On low wing airplanes, you use the wing fillet fairings to try make the junction as perpendicular as possible. Calculating the effect of drag in this area is generally based on wind tunnel testing and flight testing and not on a pure theoretical basis. The curvature you are seeing is a solution to the desire to get the best lift with the least drag at the junction.

User currently offlineCosync From Mexico, joined Nov 2001, 556 posts, RR: 0
Reply 4, posted (12 years 3 months 1 week 4 days 18 hours ago) and read 1875 times:

that photo has been edited by the way. notice all teh black lines. thats why it was rejected.

User currently offlineBruce From United States of America, joined May 1999, 5059 posts, RR: 15
Reply 5, posted (12 years 3 months 1 week 4 days 9 hours ago) and read 1839 times:

Are you talking about jagged edges - the black lines of the edges of the wings/flaps? yeah, it may have been a bit oversharpened.

There's nothing fake about it - it's only been edited for color/sharpness/size. I took this photo. It's a real 737-800, N383DN.

I'm working on fixing it for another try at upload. I was successful at another upload, a 727 from the same angle. but the 737 has much more of an angle, based on appearance, just like the big jets. I'm going to be uploading an impressive rear shot of a 767 and 777.


bruce



Bruce Leibowitz - Jackson, MS (KJAN) - Canon 50D/100-400L IS lens
User currently offlineCosync From Mexico, joined Nov 2001, 556 posts, RR: 0
Reply 6, posted (12 years 3 months 1 week 4 days ago) and read 1800 times:

welll any editing at all wont be allowed on this site unfortunately:S
so ull have to liek take the picture again or do a super pro job on editing it.


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