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DC-10-10 Engine Exhaust Structure  
User currently offlineJustplanesmart From United States of America, joined Mar 2001, 722 posts, RR: 2
Posted (12 years 2 months 6 days 11 hours ago) and read 3229 times:

This might be more suited for the Technical Forum, but this forum gets more traffic, so my apologies in advance. The DC-10-10 was originally built with a metal plate in the engine exhaust. Later it was changed to a simple cone, with the existing fleet being retrofitted. Does anyone have info as to the story behind this? The pictures below give a good comparison:


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Photo © AirNikon
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Photo © Arthur Yu



(There was a change in the L-1011 engine exhaust structure also, but I am too tired to search for comparative photos at this time. If I get some good replies to this post, I will follow up with one for the TriStar.)


"So many planes; so little time..."
6 replies: All unread, jump to last
 
User currently offlineIahcsr From United States of America, joined Jun 1999, 3433 posts, RR: 41
Reply 1, posted (12 years 2 months 6 days 10 hours ago) and read 3207 times:
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Sorry to say I don't know the story behind the change .... Other then that it's a design upgrade.


Working very hard to Fly Right....
User currently offlineRmm From Australia, joined Feb 2001, 524 posts, RR: 1
Reply 2, posted (12 years 2 months 6 days 8 hours ago) and read 3171 times:

I'll think you'll find the -10 had a hot stream thrust reverser. This was dropped on later models.

Rmm


User currently offlineSAS23 From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 3, posted (12 years 2 months 6 days 8 hours ago) and read 3163 times:

Rmm, that was certainly the case with the L1011 where you can see 'spikes' in the engine exhaust cones on some of the -22Bs where the hot stream reversers travelled. The costs of maintenance outweighed the benefits, and they were removed ... as was the case with the CF6-6.

User currently offlinePanman From Trinidad and Tobago, joined Aug 1999, 790 posts, RR: 0
Reply 4, posted (12 years 2 months 6 days 5 hours ago) and read 3128 times:

What benefits? Considering that only about 10% of the thrust is generated by the hot stream on a turbofan (it's main function being drive the compressors and fan) the effects of reversing the hot stream would be negligible. Hot stream reversers are more effect on turbojets (old 737s, 727s. 707 etc).

paNMan


User currently offlineJustplanesmart From United States of America, joined Mar 2001, 722 posts, RR: 2
Reply 5, posted (12 years 2 months 5 days 15 hours ago) and read 3056 times:

Thanks, I learned something new. I did not know that any high-bypass engines ever used the core exhaust for TR. It appears that the TriStar had three different layouts:

1. The aforementioned "spikes"

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Photo © Brian J. Gore
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Photo © AirNikon



2. A longer nozzle, without the "spikes"

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Photo © Eduard Marmet
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Photo © Pierre Langlois



3. The shorter nozzle, standard with the RB211-524 on the -200, -250, -500, and retrofitted on early -22B

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Photo © AirNikon
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Photo © Rajesh Changela





"So many planes; so little time..."
User currently offlineBroke From United States of America, joined Apr 2002, 1322 posts, RR: 3
Reply 6, posted (12 years 2 months 5 days 5 hours ago) and read 3006 times:

All of the early wide bodied airplanes had hot and cold stream reversers on their engines. The hot stream portion was removed from all of these airplanes in the early to mid '70's due to reliability problems. It became a regular event for an airplane to leave part of the hot stream reverser on the runway. On the RB211 on the L-1011, this was a little more complicated because the control sequence for the whole reverser was controlled by the hot stream portion of the reverser.
Braking tests and rejected take-off performance on all airplanes are predicated without the use of the thrust reversers.


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