Sponsor Message:
Aviation Technical / Operations Forum
My Starred Topics | Profile | New Topic | Forum Index | Help | Search 
"Round" Cabin Doors On Old Viscounts?  
User currently offlineMr Spaceman From Canada, joined Mar 2001, 2787 posts, RR: 9
Posted (12 years 1 month 3 weeks 4 days 22 hours ago) and read 2301 times:

Hi guys.

During a photo search of the Vickers Viscount, I was surprised to see that several of the aircraft have "round" cabin doors instead of the usual rectangle shaped doors.

The first Viscount proyotype flew in 1948, and like most airliners had several versions develped over the years.

My questions are:

Why did the Viscount have round doors?

Did it have to do with cabin pressurization?

Are the Viscounts the only airliner with this feature? (I couldn't find any photos of other types with round doors).

When did Vickers start building Viscounts with normal looking doors?

Any info will be very interesting.

Round doors....

View Large View Medium
Click here for bigger photo!

Photo © Andy Chetwyn



View Large View Medium
Click here for bigger photo!

Photo © David Unsworth



View Large View Medium
Click here for bigger photo!

Photo © Mel Lawrence



View Large View Medium
Click here for bigger photo!

Photo © Carl Ford



Normal doors....
View Large View Medium
Click here for bigger photo!

Photo © Steve Williams



Chris  Smile




"Just a minute while I re-invent myself"
5 replies: All unread, jump to last
 
User currently offlineIMIssPiedmont From United States of America, joined May 2001, 6294 posts, RR: 33
Reply 1, posted (12 years 1 month 3 weeks 4 days 18 hours ago) and read 2277 times:

The 700s had the "round" doors, the 800s the "normal" doors. Why? I don't know.


Damn, this website is getting worse daily.
User currently offlineDuncan From United States of America, joined Apr 2002, 131 posts, RR: 0
Reply 2, posted (12 years 1 month 3 weeks 4 days 15 hours ago) and read 2264 times:

Probably to reduce the stress concentrations due to cabin pressurization. After the early Comet disasters, square cutouts in pressurized fuselages were frowned upon due to the high stress concentration at the door corners.

This is inherent in all aircraft, you will notice on Boeing 707 - 747 designs large Texas patches, called such because of their similar shape, and sometimes size  Big grin as the state of Texas. There is an approximae 3.0 stress concentration factor at the door corners, the additional area provided by the doublers, significantly reduces the stress in the skin and therefore increases the life of the fuselage before cracks start to appear.

That's my guess anyway.

Duncan


User currently offlineMr Spaceman From Canada, joined Mar 2001, 2787 posts, RR: 9
Reply 3, posted (12 years 1 month 3 weeks 3 days 23 hours ago) and read 2218 times:

Hi guys.

Thanks for your replies gentlemen.

>Duncan, if you look very closely at the 747 photos you can see what appears to be these Texas patches / doublers around the doors....that you mentioned. Are these objects in the airframe them?


View Large View Medium
Click here for bigger photo!

Photo © Gustaf Sundqvist



View Large View Medium
Click here for bigger photo!

Photo © Dean Allchin



Does anyone know if the Vickers Viscount is the only airliner ever built with round cabin doors?

View Large View Medium
Click here for bigger photo!

Photo © John P. Stewart



Chris  Smile



"Just a minute while I re-invent myself"
User currently offlineDuncan From United States of America, joined Apr 2002, 131 posts, RR: 0
Reply 4, posted (12 years 1 month 3 weeks 3 days 20 hours ago) and read 2209 times:

The Texas patches are external doublers added either as a preventative modification to stop cracking, or a repair to fix existing cracks, and prevent further cracking in the same area. Next time you board an old 727, 737 or 747, check out around the L1 door for this type of patch.

DD


User currently offlineVirgin747 From Canada, joined Oct 1999, 319 posts, RR: 0
Reply 5, posted (12 years 1 month 1 week 4 days 15 hours ago) and read 2121 times:

you gotta watch your head when boarding those Viscounts.... We have one at the Western Canadian Aviation muesum, and I've bumped my head a few times.

Top Of Page
Forum Index

Reply To This Topic "Round" Cabin Doors On Old Viscounts?
Username:
No username? Sign up now!
Password: 


Forgot Password? Be reminded.
Remember me on this computer (uses cookies)
  • Tech/Ops related posts only!
  • Not Tech/Ops related? Use the other forums
  • No adverts of any kind. This includes web pages.
  • No hostile language or criticizing of others.
  • Do not post copyright protected material.
  • Use relevant and describing topics.
  • Check if your post already been discussed.
  • Check your spelling!
  • DETAILED RULES
Add Images Add SmiliesPosting Help

Please check your spelling (press "Check Spelling" above)


Similar topics:More similar topics...
"Anti-Icing" For Cabin Doors? posted Sun Jul 8 2001 09:33:57 by Mr Spaceman
"I Just Got A Windshear Warning On The System" posted Fri Dec 2 2005 18:55:23 by Julesmusician
Why Don't We See "Secondary Inlet Doors" Anymore? posted Sun May 9 2004 14:52:12 by YS11
Aircraft Cabin Doors / Plug Type? *long* posted Sun Jun 25 2006 02:48:53 by WNCrew
Upward Sliding Cabin Doors Vs. Outward Hinged posted Thu Mar 30 2006 19:24:10 by LH455
Cabin Temperature On Large Aircraft Who Controls? posted Fri Nov 18 2005 19:41:07 by Julesmusician
No Painted Border Around Doors On This 737? posted Thu Feb 3 2005 02:16:12 by RedDragon
Reverse Thrust On Old 737s posted Thu Apr 8 2004 08:30:46 by Concord977
Inflight Opening Of Cabin Doors posted Mon Dec 29 2003 01:33:41 by CETUS
Doors On The 767 & 777 posted Fri Nov 28 2003 01:50:07 by Fanoftristars

Sponsor Message:
Printer friendly format