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Engine Delivery To Manufacturer  
User currently offlineArsenal@LHR From United Kingdom, joined Mar 2001, 7792 posts, RR: 20
Posted (12 years 1 week 1 hour ago) and read 1591 times:
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How are engines delivered to manufacturers? For example, how are Rolls Royce engines delivered to boeing from the UK?

Rdgs
Arsenal@LHR


In Arsene we trust!!
19 replies: All unread, jump to last
 
User currently offlineMr Spaceman From Canada, joined Mar 2001, 2787 posts, RR: 9
Reply 1, posted (12 years 6 days 23 hours ago) and read 1561 times:

Hello Arsenal@LHR.

Here's some photos of one method. If I remember correctly from previous posts on this topic, certain airliner types are fitted with a fifth engine mount for the purpose of transporting engines that are new or need repairs, etc.

By hanging the 5th engine from a wing for transportation (sometimes with an intake cover fairing to reduce parasite drag and ware on unlubricated engine bearings) the engine dosen't need to be dissasembled as much in order to get it to fit into the cargo hold. I believe this is what I learned.


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Photo © Nicolas Kersting



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Photo © Jörg Tegen



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Photo © AirNikon



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Photo © AirNikon



Chris  Smile



"Just a minute while I re-invent myself"
User currently offlineMr.BA From Singapore, joined Sep 2000, 3423 posts, RR: 22
Reply 2, posted (12 years 6 days 23 hours ago) and read 1548 times:

I'm not too sure here but I think engines are not assembled in the UK, it is ferried in parts in a cargo plane to Boeing for example, where RR engineers will assemble them to a piece.

I don't think engines are ferried as a fifth pod, they are only used by some airlines to fly an engine to somewhere for a plane that needs an engine replacement. Anyway, I don't think you can fit a RR trent under the wings of a B747  Smile



Boeing747 万岁!
User currently offlineB747skipper From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 3, posted (12 years 6 days 19 hours ago) and read 1522 times:

Engines are carried to aircraft manufacturers on cargo planes or other means, the "5th pod" on a 747 is strictly for transport of spare engines in case an airplane has an engine failure in a location away from the base...
(s) Skipper


User currently offlineArsenal@LHR From United Kingdom, joined Mar 2001, 7792 posts, RR: 20
Reply 4, posted (12 years 6 days 15 hours ago) and read 1499 times:
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Thanks for the responses, sounds interesting. So, do FedEx transport engines then?




In Arsene we trust!!
User currently offlineWhiskeyflyer From Ireland, joined May 2002, 224 posts, RR: 0
Reply 5, posted (12 years 6 days 8 hours ago) and read 1456 times:

We overhaul engines and have shipped and moved up to JT3Ds.
We use the back of a truck for local movements (air suspension flat bed required for turbofan engines, otherwise damage occurs to blades, bearings etc due to road roughness)
JT3D fits in nicely in a DC8 or B707 freighter.
For a cheaper option we have also sent by sea in standard 40 foot containers but that is mainly engines that need overhaul....so any damaged received is not urgent, as engine not immediately going on wing and engine is being stripped.
Engines are often airfreighted....we just received an air freighted engine from Asia. The freight company askes the size and weight and looks around for space on existing scheduled carriers flying the routes
Never shipped a really big turbofan though.


User currently offlineDhltech From United States of America, joined Sep 1999, 15 posts, RR: 0
Reply 6, posted (12 years 6 days 7 hours ago) and read 1448 times:

the first ge-90's that were shipped to boeing went on a AN-124 a/c. from CVG. I know because i helped load them. (for REAL) no pics though i was working that day.

User currently offlineL-188 From United States of America, joined Jul 1999, 29800 posts, RR: 58
Reply 7, posted (12 years 6 days 7 hours ago) and read 1445 times:

Lockheed designed the streched -30 version of the Hercules transport for the specific purpose of flying in the RB-211 engines that where going to be used on it's L-1011 aircraft.

From what I understand three of the motors could be hauled in a single L-100-30.

Pretty convient eh?

Three motors being able to fit on a Herk destined to be installed on a three engined aircraft.



OBAMA-WORST PRESIDENT EVER....Even SKOORB would be better.
User currently offlineSAS23 From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 8, posted (12 years 6 days 6 hours ago) and read 1435 times:

I would doubt that the story re the L100-30 is true ... imagine the number of stops it would have to make between Derby and Palmdale!  Big grin

On the other hand, the Conroy CL44 Guppy was built specifically to move RB211s for Lockheed. Now, the L1011 freighter can carry three complete engines (the smaller door on the DC10 means that the fans have to be removed).


User currently offlineL-188 From United States of America, joined Jul 1999, 29800 posts, RR: 58
Reply 9, posted (12 years 6 days 3 hours ago) and read 1403 times:

I'll double check that but I am pretty sure that was the imputus for developing the -30.

If memory serves that comes from an old Squadron Signal publication that I have on the Herk. I'll look at it when I get a chance.



OBAMA-WORST PRESIDENT EVER....Even SKOORB would be better.
User currently offlineKAL_LM From United States of America, joined Jun 2001, 497 posts, RR: 0
Reply 10, posted (12 years 5 days 11 hours ago) and read 1345 times:

A 747F can take several engines at any one time. We've done several different types up to 747 size locally. It's really no big deal. You can do 777 engines, but it's real tight. Usually it is overhaul stuff going back out, not newly manufactured.

regards,
Tom



is that a light at the end of the tunnel or just a train?
User currently offlinePilot1113 From United States of America, joined Aug 1999, 2333 posts, RR: 11
Reply 11, posted (12 years 5 days 8 hours ago) and read 1325 times:

KLM:

>>A 747F can take several engines at any one time.

I was under the impression that Boeing only allowed for one additional engine to be carried under the wing (the so called "5th engine"). Am I wrong here? I'm not questioning your credentials, I'm just curious. I'm also having a brain fart about now.

- Neil Harrison


User currently offlineMr AirNz From New Zealand, joined Feb 2002, 867 posts, RR: 1
Reply 12, posted (12 years 5 days 7 hours ago) and read 1315 times:

I think he meant inside the aircraft(?), as cargo.

User currently offlineKAL_LM From United States of America, joined Jun 2001, 497 posts, RR: 0
Reply 13, posted (12 years 2 days 15 hours ago) and read 1238 times:

Sorry for not making that clear, I did mean inside loaded as cargo.

regards,
Tom



is that a light at the end of the tunnel or just a train?
User currently offlineMr Spaceman From Canada, joined Mar 2001, 2787 posts, RR: 9
Reply 14, posted (11 years 12 months 1 day 18 hours ago) and read 1155 times:

Hi guys.

When I see a photo of a jet engine like the one on the DC-10-30 below, I can't help but wonder what all the different components are which are located around the outside of the engine's casing.

Thanks to you guys, I've learned a lot about what certain pieces of equipment found attached to the side of a jet engine are used for, however, I would really like to learn much more. It's a new found interest for me.

So....Does anyone know the name of some good technical books on jet engines that I could find that would teach me in detail how they work and where certain components are located?

I'm specifically interested in airliner engines, also, I'll be 36 in November so I should be able to handle many skill levels of text explanation.


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Photo © Colin T. Ebert



Here's a few questions of curiosity you might be able to help me with in the meantime.

What type of DC-10 engine is in the photo above? (I know it's likely a Hi-Bypass Ratio Turbofan, but what is it's rated thrust and who makes it...GE or RR for example).

Also, in the photo above you can see a grey coloured football shaped container on the bottom right side of the Fan/Compressor casing, a gold coloured tube attached to the middle, and multiple red hoses, etc. Can someone explain what these components are, or are they hard to pin-point? To me the bottom-front of this DC-10's engine looks like a giant circuit board! I love it.

Thanks,

Chris  Smile





"Just a minute while I re-invent myself"
User currently offlineMr Spaceman From Canada, joined Mar 2001, 2787 posts, RR: 9
Reply 15, posted (11 years 12 months 1 day 18 hours ago) and read 1153 times:

Hi guys.

I'm sorry, but I meant this thread as a NEW Tech Topic! Oops my fault. How do I fix this?

Chris  Smile



"Just a minute while I re-invent myself"
User currently offlineCovert From Ghana, joined Oct 2001, 1451 posts, RR: 2
Reply 16, posted (11 years 12 months 1 day 18 hours ago) and read 1149 times:

Just go back to the tech ops forum index and start a new topic. I'm sure they wouldn't mind...


thank goodness for TCAS !
User currently offlineJetdoctor From United Kingdom, joined Aug 2001, 257 posts, RR: 0
Reply 17, posted (11 years 12 months 1 day 9 hours ago) and read 1121 times:

Mr Spaceman

Rolls Royce created a book many years ago called "The Jet Engine" It is old, but many of the principles of jet propulsion have not changed much. Many engineering schools still use it for training. I will see if I can find my copy and get an ISBN for you. I am sure it is still available.

RT



Break ground, and head into the wind. Don't break wind and head into the ground.
User currently offlineSailorOrion From Germany, joined Feb 2001, 2058 posts, RR: 6
Reply 18, posted (11 years 12 months 1 day 3 hours ago) and read 1114 times:

I had to get my copy the "The Jet Engine" from Rolls-Royce directly, it is a very good book, updated in 1995 (I think) and costs around 20 pounds (again from the top of my head). You can find it on their webpage

SailorOrion


User currently offlineMr Spaceman From Canada, joined Mar 2001, 2787 posts, RR: 9
Reply 19, posted (11 years 12 months 17 hours ago) and read 1090 times:

Hi guys.

Thanks for your information about the book from Rolls-Royce called "The Jet Engine".

This book sounds like a great place to start a detailed understanding of jet engines and their components.

>Arsenal@LHR, I'm sorry for accidently posting this question in your topic thread.

Chris  Smile



"Just a minute while I re-invent myself"
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