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What Is The Edge Of Space (Altitude In Feet)  
User currently offlineWardialer From United States of America, joined Sep 2001, 1183 posts, RR: 0
Posted (12 years 3 weeks 4 days 9 hours ago) and read 32767 times:

At about what altitude does actual space begin in feet? I heard it was something like 350,000 feet. But I just want to make sure.

11 replies: All unread, jump to last
 
User currently offlineBragi From Iceland, joined May 2001, 218 posts, RR: 0
Reply 1, posted (12 years 3 weeks 4 days 8 hours ago) and read 32767 times:

Hi,
I hope this is helpful:
The atmosphere is divided into; the troposphere (approx. 36.000 feet, where most of the flying takes place), the stratosphere (approx. 164.000 feet), the Mesosphere (approx. 262.000 feet) and the ionosphere, which is divided into four layers and extends to about 700 kilometers. That´s approx. 2296700 Feet.

When you leave the ionosphere, you´re out of the atmosphere!



Muhammad Ali: "Superman don’t need no seat belt." Flight Attendant: "Superman don’t need no airplane, either."
User currently offlineSllevin From United States of America, joined Jan 2002, 3376 posts, RR: 6
Reply 2, posted (12 years 3 weeks 4 days 8 hours ago) and read 32767 times:

For what's it's worth, the USAF and NASA consider a person to be an astronaut if they've flown higher than 264,000 feet (50 miles). This was most relevant to people flying the X-15, which was capable of getting above that altitude.

Steve


User currently offlineJhooper From United States of America, joined Dec 2001, 6204 posts, RR: 12
Reply 3, posted (12 years 3 weeks 4 days ago) and read 32767 times:

While there might be various definitions, I don't believe that there is an exact point where atmosphere stops and space starts. The further away from earth you get, the less air molecules you will encounter, but it's a gradual transition. Perhaps someone can answer at what altitude does the sky lose it's blueness and turn black? That's where I tend to define "space".


Last year 1,944 New Yorkers saw something and said something.
User currently offlineSllevin From United States of America, joined Jan 2002, 3376 posts, RR: 6
Reply 4, posted (12 years 3 weeks 3 days 21 hours ago) and read 32767 times:

Seeing "black" and the curvature of the earth happens while one is still well within what I think we'd define as 'atmosphere' -- somewhere around 60,000 feet or so. Concorde sees it, and the XB-70 and SR-71 pilots saw it as well in the 70,000 foot range. But there's still plenty of atmosphere at that point -- enough to heat their airframes to nearly 1000 degrees Fahrenheit in the case of the SR-71!

But yes, even at 50 miles it would be tough to maintain an orbital profile, but the decay would be in tens of hours, though. The shuttle routinely operates in at the 150mile arc, though.

Steve


User currently offlineThirtyEcho From United States of America, joined Dec 2001, 1654 posts, RR: 1
Reply 5, posted (12 years 3 weeks 3 days 21 hours ago) and read 32767 times:

Physiological "space" is what counts. That is where, without a pressure suit and pressurized oxygen helmet, your blood would boil instantly in a depressurization and you would be immediately dead. Depending on atmospherics, that altitude is around 60,000 feet. Virtually all of the atmosphere is below you at 60,000.

Have fun suiting up for your trip on Concorde, heh-heh.


User currently offlinePrebennorholm From Denmark, joined Mar 2000, 6484 posts, RR: 54
Reply 6, posted (12 years 3 weeks 3 days 6 hours ago) and read 32767 times:

The 50 miles border is in fact a "political" one. Some 40 years ago the USA and the Soviet Union agreed upon recognizing the 50 miles border (or rather 80 km which is approximately 49.7 miles).

I think that that border was later somehow recognized by the UN too.

It means that an unarmed vehicle (e.g. a spy satellite) cruising above that border shall be considered a "legal" vehicle anywhere, while below....

Regards, Preben Norholm



Always keep your number of landings equal to your number of take-offs, Preben Norholm
User currently offlineGDB From United Kingdom, joined May 2001, 13229 posts, RR: 77
Reply 7, posted (12 years 3 weeks 2 days 10 hours ago) and read 32767 times:

Liquids boil at 63,000ft.
Concorde routinely reaches 58,000ft at the top of the cruise/climb.
At 58,000, the sky is a dark blue, with the curvature of the Earth visible in clear conditions, (distortion through camera lenses and windows does tend to exaggerate this in pics taken by pax though).


User currently offlineB747skipper From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 8, posted (12 years 3 weeks 2 days 8 hours ago) and read 32767 times:

GDB - which liquid - ??? water or mercury, or beer...
xxx
Blood boils at 63,000 feet, at its temperature of 98 F or 37 C...
Reason why pressure suit required to fly at high levels...
xxx
My blood boils too, in view of numerous incorrect statements, at sea level...
(s) Skipper


User currently offlinePrebennorholm From Denmark, joined Mar 2000, 6484 posts, RR: 54
Reply 9, posted (12 years 3 weeks 2 days 3 hours ago) and read 32767 times:

Lukewarm beer starts boiling off the alcohol slightly above 50,000 ft. So if you want to get blasted on a Concorde trip, then better keep that cabin pressure up or keep your beer cold.

On an unpressurised Concorde I'd recommend whisky on the rocks rather than hot tea.

PS: Only one slight problem - when the alcohol goes into your blood, then how do you keep it cold?



Always keep your number of landings equal to your number of take-offs, Preben Norholm
User currently offlineAA_Cam From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 10, posted (12 years 3 weeks 2 days 1 hour ago) and read 32767 times:

If this helps... On average, at 100,000ft, 99% of the atmosphere's molecules are below you. But there is still a whole heck of a lot of distance above you too!

Cameron


User currently offlineGDB From United Kingdom, joined May 2001, 13229 posts, RR: 77
Reply 11, posted (12 years 3 weeks 1 day 11 hours ago) and read 32767 times:

I was obviously referring to the previous post, which specified blood, but it was late!
Concorde's cabin pressure is some 6000ft.


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