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I Thought Engines Are Parallel Aligned To Fuselage  
User currently offlineJgore From Argentina, joined Feb 2002, 550 posts, RR: 2
Posted (11 years 8 months 3 weeks 4 days 15 hours ago) and read 2601 times:

Looking at this picture, I noticed that engines are not parallel aligned to the fuselage. Instead, they seem to be in-bound aligned.
Am I correct ? . If so, why they are installed that way ?, Is this a common pattern in all aircrafts ?.


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Photo © Tim Samples


Regards

Jgore  Smile

9 replies: All unread, jump to last
 
User currently offlineAJ From Australia, joined Nov 1999, 2386 posts, RR: 24
Reply 1, posted (11 years 8 months 3 weeks 4 days 14 hours ago) and read 2565 times:

Yes, you're correct. 'Toeing' in of wing mounted engines reduces stresses on the wing root allowing lighter structures to be used.

User currently offlineJetguy From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 2, posted (11 years 8 months 3 weeks 4 days 14 hours ago) and read 2565 times:

I'm not sure why the engines appear to mounted the way they are in this picture, but canting the engines on aircraft with aft mounted powerplants is almost universal. They are mounted with the engine inlets outboard a few degrees. One of the explinations that I remember from one of my type rating ground schools regarding the outward canting of the engines (as seen from the front) was to minimize the rudder forces required in the case of engine failure. Also, it's common to mount the engines on larger single-engine aircraft with a significant cant. Next time you get a chance go look at a late model Bonanza. It will really surprise you. You'd think the airplane would fly sideways through the air.

Jetguy


User currently offlineSllevin From United States of America, joined Jan 2002, 3376 posts, RR: 6
Reply 3, posted (11 years 8 months 3 weeks 4 days 13 hours ago) and read 2452 times:

Typically the engines are canted to account for airflow and shockwaves from the fuselage; either to reduce drag, or increase effectiveness, or both.

The reason on the MD-80, for example, that the engines are distinctly canted upwards is to account for the airflow and it goes up over the wing and then down again.

Steve


User currently offlineNikes From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 4, posted (11 years 8 months 3 weeks 3 days 14 hours ago) and read 2268 times:

Wow ... i never knew that ... you would think that a component of thrust is "wasted" by having the engines like that.

-Nikes


User currently offlineJgore From Argentina, joined Feb 2002, 550 posts, RR: 2
Reply 5, posted (11 years 8 months 3 weeks 2 days 21 hours ago) and read 2167 times:

Thanks for your 2 cents.

Regards

Jgore  Smile


User currently offlineBio15 From Colombia, joined Mar 2001, 1089 posts, RR: 7
Reply 6, posted (11 years 8 months 3 weeks 21 hours ago) and read 1991 times:

I have read posts about this question previously. The consensus was that it is due to the bow wave generated by the nose of the aircraft. It's like a boat moving through the water. You can see the lines of water forming an angle with the nose, as if it had caught a rope (not sure about the picture of that  Smile). With the planes it's the same thing but with air so you can't see it. And engines are tilted inward to meet the greatest amount of air which will be coming in that angled direction. Don't know if I was clear

-Alfredo


User currently offlineJgore From Argentina, joined Feb 2002, 550 posts, RR: 2
Reply 7, posted (11 years 8 months 3 weeks 4 hours ago) and read 1916 times:

You mean they take some air away from the nose in order to avoid the friction of the nose with the air ?

Jgore  Smile


User currently offlineBio15 From Colombia, joined Mar 2001, 1089 posts, RR: 7
Reply 8, posted (11 years 8 months 2 weeks 3 days 22 hours ago) and read 1781 times:

No, the air strikes the nose as usual. The nose splits the air and pushes it outward so the aircraft can penetrate, and the engine tilt is to catch the most of this deflected air.

Here you can see the water wave I mentioned. Notice the boat moves the water that way, same as aircraft move the air. Picture the kid with his arms extended and a pair of engines hanging down.  Smile



Saludos
-Alfredo


User currently offlineJgore From Argentina, joined Feb 2002, 550 posts, RR: 2
Reply 9, posted (11 years 8 months 2 weeks 2 days 15 hours ago) and read 1710 times:

ohhhhh yeah, i got the point Big grin

Thank you very much

Jgore  Smile


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