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Is There In-flight Sonic Bump?  
User currently offlineLehpron From United States of America, joined Jul 2001, 7028 posts, RR: 21
Posted (11 years 5 months 1 week 2 days 2 hours ago) and read 2392 times:

I remember reading a UFO story about a 747 crossing the Atlantic one summer and both pilots reported an object on radar was coming right at them pasted M2, it "flew" underneath the 747 by about a thousand feet. They braced for a soft sonic boom from the object which never came.

I do not remember the conclusion of this story nor any investigation, but let us assume it was an aircraft, would the 747 have experienced a soft bump from the passing object?

I called it 'in-flight sonic bump' because the shockwave supposedly impacted a moving vehicle rather than the ground. Since they were both moving at each other would the M2 shock have felt like a M3; assuming there was an in-flight bump?




Though somewhat off topic (I can do that since I'm the topic starter), if it was 'not of this planet', I can pretty much guess that this vehicle pushes away at the atmosphere to fly and probably doesn't touch the air, thus no shockwave -- but that is beside the point.


The meaning of life is curiosity; we were put on this planet to explore opportunities.
7 replies: All unread, jump to last
 
User currently offlineLehpron From United States of America, joined Jul 2001, 7028 posts, RR: 21
Reply 1, posted (11 years 5 months 1 week 13 hours ago) and read 1439 times:

 Confused 951 views and no replies, a record?

 Wow! C'mon, nobody knows about in-flight booms?

If it was the "UFO" crap that threw you off, please feel free to replace it with "aircraft" and proceed. I'm sure it's happened, where two aircraft pass each others when one is traveling pasted sound, there has to be some kind of interaction.




The meaning of life is curiosity; we were put on this planet to explore opportunities.
User currently offlineVC-10 From United Kingdom, joined Oct 1999, 3695 posts, RR: 35
Reply 2, posted (11 years 5 months 1 week 6 hours ago) and read 1376 times:
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Civil aircraft radar doesn't detect aircraft

User currently offlineBravo45 From United States of America, joined Sep 2001, 2165 posts, RR: 11
Reply 3, posted (11 years 5 months 6 days 9 hours ago) and read 1329 times:

What do you mean by "pushes away at the atmosphere to fly and probably doesn't touch the air, thus no shockwave" ? I mean ANY material object moving througha medium would cause its displacement.
BTW About the other thing, I have already posted it on the other threat that you started.


User currently offlineLehpron From United States of America, joined Jul 2001, 7028 posts, RR: 21
Reply 4, posted (11 years 5 months 6 days 8 hours ago) and read 1320 times:

"What do you mean by "pushes away at the atmosphere to fly and probably doesn't touch the air, thus no shockwave" ? I mean ANY material object moving through a medium would cause its displacement. "

Unlike most students, I'm probably one of a few that actively thinks about UFO technology throughout my educational career applying known Physics laws & observations wherever possible. While I explain this, there is a chance that I may go off topic, but since I brought it up then technically I have not broken any rules...


Look around, our planet's gravity holds in our atmosphere, without it we would not be here. That is not to say that other celestial bodies with gravity automatically have an atmosphere, look at our moon. All planets in and outside our solar system (those that have been detected) have atmospheres; but hostile, which means we cannot live in them.

It seems to be a widely held belief that those vehicles identified as UFO's (which seems like an oxymoron to me), run on a propulsion system that we are not capable of duplicating. I have my theories, but it seems that these vehicles generate an effect of lack of gravity*. That is, outward instead of inward, unlike the current understanding of gravity. Anyways, since it is gravity that pulls air to earth, then an 'anti-gravitational’ vehicle will push air away from it in all directions, thus no air will touch it. **

But then how does it move? Well consider that an aircraft has more that one force to keep it in the air, one is the engine, and two is the wing. There has to be at least one more 'gravity generator' to force it along. That would be the DISPLACEMENT you were asking about, it might be reacting to something that has to be common on all celestial bodies in space: A magnetic field. However, our mag field is very weak, if anything, that craft would have to amplify it via some ferromagnetic material with a high magnification constant.


Hope it helps you understand what I meant. The scientific term for this type of engine system is called "Field propulsion", though you won't find much of UFO-tech, look it up.  Big thumbs up


*I don't like to say 'anti-gravity' that cuz our science says gravity cannot be generated, it is dictated by mass. Their machines must be reacting to something that gives us the impression of being against gravity -- I'll bet it has nothing to do with gravity.)


**Once you're a certain short distance away from the craft the atmosphere will be restored. Like the air behind a plane will be restored after the vortex swirls calm down. Sound needs air to travel so you wouldn't hear it if it were above you. But then theoretically you wouldn't be able to breathe either, as there is no air in the local region around the craft. A vehicle like this would experience no friction from the atmosphere whatsoever.




The meaning of life is curiosity; we were put on this planet to explore opportunities.
User currently offlineCovert From Ghana, joined Oct 2001, 1445 posts, RR: 2
Reply 5, posted (11 years 5 months 6 days 3 hours ago) and read 1294 times:

Like VC-10 said, Civil Aircraft radar=weather radar...


thank goodness for TCAS !
User currently offlineBravo45 From United States of America, joined Sep 2001, 2165 posts, RR: 11
Reply 6, posted (11 years 5 months 6 days ago) and read 1282 times:

Though I have not searched for the topic of UFOs a lot, I don't miss any possible information of the opportunity shows itself, you would definately have better knowledge about the theories of the propulsion of the UFOs.
I have heard the name Field Propulsion but couldn't remember any explaination, now I certainly would. While the existence of this sort of propulsion technique will not create sound a lot, it would definately have turbulance. The only sound (negligible though) might be the sound of the displacing air. No air friction, certainly a major increase in efficiency.
Very interesting topic this UFO one is.


User currently offlineBravo45 From United States of America, joined Sep 2001, 2165 posts, RR: 11
Reply 7, posted (11 years 5 months 6 days ago) and read 1281 times:

....., I don't miss any possibility of getting information on this topic whenever the opportunity shows itself (don't know where were my eyes concentrating when I was typing this) Sorry.

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