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Why Asian Pilots Use Gloves During Flight Ops?  
User currently offlineJgore From Argentina, joined Feb 2002, 550 posts, RR: 2
Posted (12 years 1 day 3 hours ago) and read 10206 times:

Not even on a.net, but also in many books I saw many asian pilots were wearing gloves during flight operations.

Why is it?.
Maybe they produce a lot of perspiration on their hands ?


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Jgore  Smile

57 replies: All unread, showing first 25:
 
User currently offlineIndian_flyboy From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 1, posted (12 years 1 day 2 hours ago) and read 10163 times:

Hi Jgore ,

This has already been discussed in one post in the civil ops . The reason behind this is that white is the symbol of purity and is very widely used in the south east asian countries as a good luck charm .

Regards


User currently offlineJgore From Argentina, joined Feb 2002, 550 posts, RR: 2
Reply 2, posted (12 years 1 day 1 hour ago) and read 10153 times:

Thank you very much.
I'll do a search about that.

Jgore  Smile


User currently offlineAzeem From Pakistan, joined Jul 2000, 137 posts, RR: 0
Reply 3, posted (12 years 21 hours ago) and read 10127 times:

Indian_flyboy is right. Its Japenese culture. Not sure about other south asian countries. In Japan, pilots, drivers etc wear white gloves.

- Azeem


User currently offlineN949WP From Hong Kong, joined Feb 2000, 1437 posts, RR: 1
Reply 4, posted (12 years 19 hours ago) and read 10107 times:

It IS largely a Japanese custom. Don't see much white gloves outside of Japan.

'949


User currently offlineSwissgabe From Switzerland, joined Jan 2000, 5266 posts, RR: 33
Reply 5, posted (11 years 11 months 4 weeks 17 hours ago) and read 9830 times:

I would call it Japanese Pilots.
In Korea they might also do it but I haven't seen that in the airline industry, only taxi and bus drivers.



Smooth as silk - Royal Orchid Service /// Suid-Afrikaanse Lugdiens - Springbok
User currently offlineDelta-flyer From United States of America, joined Jul 2001, 2676 posts, RR: 6
Reply 6, posted (11 years 11 months 4 weeks 5 hours ago) and read 9727 times:

I once heard that the old style pushbutton switches can get very hot -- but then all pilots would be wearing gloves, unless the Japanese have more sensitive fingers.

Pete  Smile


User currently offlineSAS-A321 From Denmark, joined Mar 2002, 401 posts, RR: 0
Reply 7, posted (11 years 11 months 3 weeks 6 days 17 hours ago) and read 9671 times:

You might see it on other airlines if they fly a royal or other important person.


It's Scandinavian
User currently offlineAA61hvy From United States of America, joined Nov 1999, 13977 posts, RR: 57
Reply 8, posted (11 years 11 months 3 weeks 4 days 15 hours ago) and read 9552 times:

I havent seen CX pilots wear gloves.


Go big or go home
User currently offlineGotAirbus From Singapore, joined May 2001, 851 posts, RR: 1
Reply 9, posted (11 years 11 months 3 weeks 3 days 6 hours ago) and read 9471 times:

That's because CX pilots are Chinese or European ...we do not see our pilots handling planes (Chinese taxi drivers too) with white gloves than more Japanese/Korean people do get "obsessed" with symbols of purity and the like.

(gotAirbus?)-(Got Commonality?)-(Have A Nice Flight!)



(gotAIRBUS?) - (Got Commonality?) - (Have A Nice Flight!)
User currently offline411A From United States of America, joined Nov 2001, 1826 posts, RR: 8
Reply 10, posted (11 years 11 months 2 weeks 2 days 16 hours ago) and read 9292 times:

Gloves...and not just white.
Years ago was assigned an aircraft PC (sim not yet approved) in a Lockheed TriStar. The aircraft was just out of 'D' check and located in Jeddah, and the day was very hot...42C.
During maintenance, the nosewheel tiller had been painted with the shinyest of black paint. This resulted in not only it being very hot, but slippery as well.
A golf glove on the left hand saved the day and has been used by yours truly ever since.



User currently offlineCx flyboy From Hong Kong, joined Dec 1999, 6626 posts, RR: 55
Reply 11, posted (11 years 11 months 2 weeks 2 days 6 hours ago) and read 9255 times:

I flew with a Captain just 3 days ago that wore white gloves, although only until top of climb, and from top of descent to after landing. Not sure why. Looks silly, plus Boeing have designed each knob on the MCP panel to have a different feel to it with different shapes and different grooves. This is to give a distinction between them, especially when there may be smoke in the cockpit and you may have to feel your way around. Wearing gloves makes it all harder in my opinion. I imagine trying to type an e-mail wearing gloves. It just wouldn't work.

User currently offlineHerman From Singapore, joined Jul 2000, 231 posts, RR: 0
Reply 12, posted (11 years 11 months 2 weeks 1 day 17 hours ago) and read 9205 times:

Apparently, they think its professionalism.

 Smokin cool


User currently offlineBravo45 From United States of America, joined Sep 2001, 2165 posts, RR: 11
Reply 13, posted (11 years 11 months 2 weeks 7 hours ago) and read 9164 times:

Other than the "sign of good luck" thing, is there any thing else that the gloves help? Secondly are their any special pilot gloves? I have seen a PIA 747 pilot and First officer in the same cockpit using the gloves (weren't as white as in the pictures above and besides the sign of good luck is not the case in Pakistan). I was curious too and wanted to ask, but forgot it as I got absorbed in the on going events.

User currently offlineHAWK21M From India, joined Jan 2001, 31702 posts, RR: 56
Reply 14, posted (7 years 5 months 3 weeks 4 days 23 hours ago) and read 8072 times:

Quoting Bravo45 (Reply 13):
Other than the "sign of good luck" thing, is there any thing else that the gloves help

Could it also be Hygenic point of view of the Individuals & better grip.
regds
MEL



Think of the brighter side!
User currently offlineZeke From Hong Kong, joined Dec 2006, 9210 posts, RR: 76
Reply 15, posted (7 years 5 months 3 weeks 4 days 22 hours ago) and read 8053 times:

Quoting AA61hvy (Reply 8):
I havent seen CX pilots wear gloves.



Quoting Cx flyboy (Reply 11):
I flew with a Captain just 3 days ago that wore white gloves, although only until top of climb, and from top of descent to after landing. Not sure why. Looks silly, plus Boeing have designed each knob on the MCP panel to have a different feel to it with different shapes and different grooves. This is to give a distinction between them, especially when there may be smoke in the cockpit and you may have to feel your way around. Wearing gloves makes it all harder in my opinion. I imagine trying to type an e-mail wearing gloves. It just wouldn't work.

Few about, some ex-military chaps just never left their previous life, others do it on medical advice becuase of the risk or disposition to skin cancer.



We are addicted to our thoughts. We cannot change anything if we cannot change our thinking – Santosh Kalwar
User currently offlineJetlagged From United Kingdom, joined Jan 2005, 2572 posts, RR: 25
Reply 16, posted (7 years 5 months 3 weeks 4 days 18 hours ago) and read 7969 times:

Quoting Zeke (Reply 15):
Few about, some ex-military chaps just never left their previous life, others do it on medical advice becuase of the risk or disposition to skin cancer.

It used to be pretty much standard to wear flying gloves in the RAF. Not the enormous gauntlets of WW1, they are thin, soft and flexible leather gloves, designed for maximum feel. The ones in the photo look more like something you would wear for a round of golf. The main reason is that the military fly war planes in war situations, so may need to operate controls which are hot, or even burning. They also provide a sure grip when the palms are sweaty. You can also right "LEFT" and "RIGHT" on them in case you get easily confused.  Smile

Not normal encountered on a civil airliner, but old habits die hard for some.



The glass isn't half empty, or half full, it's twice as big as it needs to be.
User currently offlineBlackbird From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 17, posted (7 years 5 months 3 weeks 4 days 13 hours ago) and read 7873 times:

Well, as one member here said, it's got to do with the fact that white is often in asian cultures viewed as a symbol of purity. I remember hearing at Buddhist funerals, everybody wears white... not black.

Also the Japanese (as in from Japan) are OBSESSED with cleanliness (not that that's a bad thing, but it is notable)

Andrea K


User currently offlineStarlionblue From Greenland, joined Feb 2004, 17118 posts, RR: 66
Reply 18, posted (7 years 5 months 3 weeks 4 days 13 hours ago) and read 7855 times:

Quoting Cx flyboy (Reply 11):
Looks silly, plus Boeing have designed each knob on the MCP panel to have a different feel to it with different shapes and different grooves. This is to give a distinction between them, especially when there may be smoke in the cockpit and you may have to feel your way around. Wearing gloves makes it all harder in my opinion. I imagine trying to type an e-mail wearing gloves. It just wouldn't work.

As Jetlagged mentions, flying gloves are thin enough to give good tactile sensation. They also help you not slip. Not that the latter is a big problem in airliner ops.



"There are no stupid questions, but there are a lot of inquisitive idiots."
User currently offlineJetlagged From United Kingdom, joined Jan 2005, 2572 posts, RR: 25
Reply 19, posted (7 years 5 months 3 weeks 4 days 12 hours ago) and read 7836 times:

Quoting Blackbird (Reply 17):
Also the Japanese (as in from Japan) are OBSESSED with cleanliness (not that that's a bad thing, but it is notable)

Is there another kind of Japanese? In their case I understand it's more about not transferring their germs so others can pick them up, not just simply avoiding other people's germs. The first time I saw people in Tokyo wearing masks I assumed it was because of polution, but a local told me it was probably because they had a cold. You keep your germs to yourself in other words.

Quoting Starlionblue (Reply 18):
They also help you not slip. Not that the latter is a big problem in airliner ops.

Only if you lose your grip on your glass in the bar after the flight.



The glass isn't half empty, or half full, it's twice as big as it needs to be.
User currently offlineKELPkid From United States of America, joined Nov 2005, 6428 posts, RR: 3
Reply 20, posted (7 years 5 months 3 weeks 4 days 12 hours ago) and read 7834 times:

Quoting HAWK21M (Reply 14):
Could it also be Hygenic point of view of the Individuals & better grip.
regds
MEL

Well, from my high school and college days in the marching band and the ROTC colorguard, white, especially on gloves, is an extremely hard color to keep clean. I probably averaged about 1 pair of gloves a month...

The band ones were pretty cool, though. They were 100% cotton and had these tiny little rubber dots on the inside of the fingers and on the palm that improved your grip  Smile I wonder if Japanese pilots use that style of gloves...



Celebrating the birth of KELPkidJR on August 5, 2009 :-)
User currently offlineStarlionblue From Greenland, joined Feb 2004, 17118 posts, RR: 66
Reply 21, posted (7 years 5 months 3 weeks 4 days 11 hours ago) and read 7793 times:

Quoting Jetlagged (Reply 19):
Quoting Starlionblue (Reply 18):
They also help you not slip. Not that the latter is a big problem in airliner ops.

Only if you lose your grip on your glass in the bar after the flight.

My god, the humanity!

Quoting Jetlagged (Reply 19):
Is there another kind of Japanese?

The ones in cartoons. Big grin Seriously though, I have two friends with Japanese wives. Neither girl has ever lived in Japan for more than a few months. But they most definitely see themselves as Japanese. And yes, they have a very different outlook on life.

Quoting KELPkid (Reply 20):
Well, from my high school and college days in the marching band and the ROTC colorguard, white, especially on gloves, is an extremely hard color to keep clean. I probably averaged about 1 pair of gloves a month

I feel your pain. The French Foreign Legion has white hats for their dress uniforms. The basic rule is: never touch the white part. Thankfully the brim is black.



"There are no stupid questions, but there are a lot of inquisitive idiots."
User currently offlineMD11Engineer From Germany, joined Oct 2003, 14130 posts, RR: 62
Reply 22, posted (7 years 5 months 3 weeks 4 days 8 hours ago) and read 7725 times:

Cockpits can be extremely manky. Often I don't understand the pilots. It is them whio have to sit for 8+ hours in there, I don't understand why they leave the cockpits so messy, with food crumbs etc. thrown all over the place. I know some pilots, who bring a desinfectant spray or desinfectant wipes and wipe all swiches, armrests and controls with them when they take over an aircraft.

Quoting Jetlagged (Reply 16):
Few about, some ex-military chaps just never left their previous life, others do it on medical advice becuase of the risk or disposition to skin cancer.

It used to be pretty much standard to wear flying gloves in the RAF. Not the enormous gauntlets of WW1, they are thin, soft and flexible leather gloves, designed for maximum feel. The ones in the photo look more like something you would wear for a round of golf. The main reason is that the military fly war planes in war situations, so may need to operate controls which are hot, or even burning. They also provide a sure grip when the palms are sweaty. You can also right "LEFT" and "RIGHT" on them in case you get easily confused. Smile

Not normal encountered on a civil airliner, but old habits die hard for some.

In the military there is another reason: In combat the aircraft might catch fire and then it is advisable to have as little skin as possible exposed to the flames. Thus the flight suit is made out of a fire retardant material (Nomex today, in WW2 it used to be leather or wool). The oxygen mask also has a secondary purpose to protect the face (in WW2 the pilots wore their goggles inside an enclosed cockpit. Some fighters had a fuel tank between the engine and the cockpit. Shot down pilots were often terribly disconfigured by burns.

Jan


User currently offlineStarlionblue From Greenland, joined Feb 2004, 17118 posts, RR: 66
Reply 23, posted (7 years 5 months 3 weeks 4 days 5 hours ago) and read 7646 times:

Quoting MD11Engineer (Reply 22):
Cockpits can be extremely manky. Often I don't understand the pilots. It is them whio have to sit for 8+ hours in there, I don't understand why they leave the cockpits so messy, with food crumbs etc. thrown all over the place. I know some pilots, who bring a desinfectant spray or desinfectant wipes and wipe all swiches, armrests and controls with them when they take over an aircraft.

I can well imagine it. The problem with "communal usage" like cockpits is that no one feels responsible. It's not theirs after all. Most of us were taught to leave such places in a better state than we found them. But then again...



"There are no stupid questions, but there are a lot of inquisitive idiots."
User currently offlineBuckFifty From Canada, joined Oct 2001, 1316 posts, RR: 19
Reply 24, posted (7 years 5 months 3 weeks 4 days 3 hours ago) and read 7602 times:

Quoting MD11Engineer (Reply 22):
Cockpits can be extremely manky. Often I don't understand the pilots. It is them whio have to sit for 8+ hours in there, I don't understand why they leave the cockpits so messy, with food crumbs etc. thrown all over the place. I know some pilots, who bring a desinfectant spray or desinfectant wipes and wipe all swiches, armrests and controls with them when they take over an aircraft.

They took out a RMP in front of me once. Looked in the hole, and I swear I can see cockroaches running around.


25 Molykote : Could have been. Most carriers that I am aware of do place insect traps throughout their aircraft.
26 HAWK21M : With our Freighter arriving from BLR.Mosquitoes are a problem so regular repellant is used. regds MEL
27 Tt737fo : The Japanese white glove thing is simply this: courtesy and cleanliness. Train workers and taxi drivers also wear white gloves. Many KAL pilots wear w
28 Post contains images YYZYYT : Had the same thought, wore white gloves for five years in the army cadet corps. The gloves were quite slippery and useless at gripping anything (such
29 Starlionblue : Lol. Those dots need to be way bigger to give any decent grip. My daughter has the bruises to prove it.
30 Uscgc130 : The difference is that Nomex flight gloves are worn by military pilots for a reason that's readily apparent.
31 Bond007 : I guess I'm missing the part where wearing gloves is hygienic ??? So they go to the bathroom, wash their hands, and then put their dirty gloves back
32 HAWK21M : That way to ensure Germ free washing use a photocell operated basin,as touching a dirty hand on a tap,washing ones hand & closing that tap handle tra
33 Post contains images Starlionblue : That's why you grab a paper towel before you start washing, so you can close the taps with it. I think the whole bacteria scare in the US is totally
34 YYZYYT : Surely not just then? But at least they're getting their own germs on their hands and not everybody elses' germs. Or passing their germs on.
35 Starlionblue : Well, no. But that is the most important time for most people. What's the big deal? There are germs all around us and inside us. They do fly around i
36 Post contains images KELPkid : If cleanliness is your thing, then aviation is the wrong industry to be in Even as a pilot, you have routine contact with greasy parts and fuel (pre-f
37 HAWK21M : Especially A&P. regds MEL
38 Starlionblue : At least most carriers in North America and Europe have banned smoking in the cockpit nowadays.
39 David L : This is something I've believed for years and now more doctors are confirming it. Anecdotal, perhaps, but it agrees with many such examples I've witn
40 Bond007 : Why is that? Why is wearing gloves ANY different than wearing skin? However the germs got onto your bare hands, can just as easily happen on gloves.
41 Starlionblue : Agreed. Also, if there is grease or sticky gooey ectoplasm on anything in the cockpit, it may be easier to wear gloves that absorb rather than skin t
42 Post contains images MD11Engineer : There exists a theory among doctors, being supported by statistical analysis of the number of occurences of allergies in rich industrial countries wi
43 KELPkid : Indeed. Cigarette Smoke is bad for not only the lungs, but avionics, gyroscopes, and the cloth and plastic in the interior.
44 Starlionblue : I have read much of the same. Now my wife and I have the chance to ruin (ahem, I mean raise) a new generation. We are hoping that she will not have t
45 Post contains images HAWK21M : I don't notice the Avionics guys there Thats the worst you mentioned. regds MEL
46 BAe146QT : Hear, hear. Seems to me that the West is bringing up a generation of sickly wimps. Ironic, given that it's being done in the name of keeping them saf
47 Post contains images Starlionblue : Going off topic here, but this is true of psychology as well as physiology. With the current crop of "nothing but the best to make my child a success
48 YYZYYT : Because you can take off the gloves when you need to scratch your face, thus leaving all of those other germs behind on the gloves rather than on you
49 Starlionblue : Hehe. Indeed it is.
50 Post contains images Bond007 : Aaaah ... that's what they do right? Every time they touch any other part of skin, they take their gloves off? ....of course I hope they only take on
51 Ha763 : Nope. If you look closely, the pilots are actually wearing white golf gloves. I've seen batting gloves and even fingerless gloves being used by Japan
52 Trent1000 : "Good luck"? Don't think so. taxi drivers, train drivers, you name it... part of the uniform (in Japan). The little theatrical hand movements are quit
53 HAWK21M : Are you sure. Or do you mean Batting inner gloves. regds MEL
54 Ha763 : Baseball batting gloves.
55 YYZYYT : Let me say again that I am not a germophobic type... but I CAN'T resist playing devil's advocate. Germs on your skin may not necessarily be a problem
56 Bond007 : I don't disagree .... but I'll ask again ... how is this different whether I wear gloves or not?? Jimbo
57 Post contains images Starlionblue : Hehe. Well, the likelihood of someone with any dangerous disease having touched the doorknob/elevator button AND it being transmitted is pretty low.
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