Sponsor Message:
Aviation Technical / Operations Forum
My Starred Topics | Profile | New Topic | Forum Index | Help | Search 
Oxygen Tanks  
User currently offlineAlitis From United States of America, joined Apr 2000, 259 posts, RR: 0
Posted (11 years 6 months 3 weeks 11 hours ago) and read 3700 times:

How much oxygen is required to be carried on board for the passenger drop down masks? Does ETOPS change this requirement?

-alitis

2 replies: All unread, jump to last
 
User currently offlineCdfmxtech From United States of America, joined Jul 2000, 1338 posts, RR: 27
Reply 1, posted (11 years 6 months 3 weeks 7 hours ago) and read 3659 times:

There are FARs that cover oxygen requirements for Part 121 carriers.
If u meant exactly how much oxygen (measurements) is on let's say a B757, thats hard. There is one crew O2 cylinder which is holds approx 56 cubic feet of O2 at 1850 psi. Then you've got chemical oxygen generators at each pax set capable of supplying a minimum of 12 minutes of O2 to each passenger. Then there are approx 10 Portable Oxygen bottles located throughout the cabin. Then you've got chemical generators each at flt attendant station and in the lavs. Had enough. I didn't think so, read further...

I found this from an Advisory Circular. It is for twin engine aircraft without ETOPS approval, but it should give u a general idea on how oxygen affects ETOPS.

Airplanes must be able to fly to adequate aerodrome

A.
- At 10,000 ft; or
- At 25,000 ft or the single-engine ceiling, whichever is lower, provided that all occupants can be suppllied with and use supplemental oxygen for the time required to fly from the critical point to an alternate aerodrome, or
- At the single-engine ceiling, provided that the aircraft is type certificated to operate above FL450

Now combine that with these aforementioned FARs...

§ 121.333 Supplemental oxygen for emergency descent and for first aid; turbine engine powered airplanes with pressurized cabins.

(a) General. When operating a turbine engine powered airplane with a pressurized cabin, the certificate holder shall furnish oxygen and dispensing equipment to comply with paragraphs (b) through (e) of this section in the event of cabin pressurization failure.

(b) Crewmembers. When operating at flight altitudes above 10,000 feet, the certificate holder shall supply enough oxygen to comply with § 121.329, but not less than a two-hour supply for each flight crewmember on flight deck duty. The required two hours supply is that quantity of oxygen necessary for a constant rate of descent from the airplane's maximum certificated operating altitude to 10,000 feet in ten minutes and followed by 110 minutes at 10,000 feet. The oxygen required in the event of cabin pressurization failure by § 121.337 may be included in determining the supply required for flight crewmembers on flight deck duty.

(c) Use of oxygen masks by flight crewmembers. (1) When operating at flight altitudes above flight level 250, each flight crewmember on flight deck duty must be provided with an oxygen mask so designed that it can be rapidly placed on his face from its ready position, properly secured, sealed, and supplying oxygen upon demand; and so designed that after being placed on the face it does not prevent immediate communication between the flight crewmember and other crewmembers over the airplane intercommunication system. When it is not being used at flight altitudes above flight level 250, the oxygen mask must be kept in condition for ready use and located so as to be within the immediate reach of the flight crewmember while at his duty station.

(2) When operating at flight altitudes above flight level 250, one pilot at the controls of the airplane shall at all times wear and use an oxygen mask secured, sealed, and supplying oxygen, in accordance with the following:

(i) The one pilot need not wear and use an oxygen mask at or below the following flight levels if each flight crewmember on flight deck duty has a quick-donning type of oxygen mask that the certificate holder has shown can be placed on the face from its ready position, properly secured, sealed, and supplying oxygen upon demand, with one hand and within five seconds:

(A) For airplanes having a passenger seat configuration of more than 30 seats, excluding any required crewmember seat, or a payload capacity of more than 7,500 pounds, at or below flight level 410.

(B) For airplanes having a passenger seat configuration of less than 31 seats, excluding any required crewmember seat, and a payload capacity of 7,500 pounds or less, at or below flight level 350.

(ii) Whenever a quick-donning type of oxygen mask is to be used under this section, the certificate holder shall also show that the mask can be put on without disturbing eye glasses and without delaying the flight crewmember from proceeding with his assigned emergency duties. The oxygen mask after being put on must not prevent immediate communication between the flight crewmember and other crewmembers over the airplane intercommunication system.

(3) Notwithstanding paragraph (c)(2) of this section, if for any reason at any time it is necessary for one pilot to leave his station at the controls of the airplane when operating at flight altitudes above flight level 250, the remaining pilot at the controls shall put on and use his oxygen mask until the other pilot has returned to his duty station.

(4) Before the takeoff of a flight, each flight crewmember shall personally preflight his oxygen equipment to insure that the oxygen mask is functioning, fitted properly, and connected to appropriate supply terminals, and that the oxygen supply and pressure are adequate for use.

(d) Use of portable oxygen equipment by cabin attendants. Each attendant shall, during flight above flight level 250 flight altitude, carry portable oxygen equipment with at least a 15-minute supply of oxygen unless it is shown that enough portable oxygen units with masks or spare outlets and masks are distributed throughout the cabin to insure immediate availability of oxygen to each cabin attendant, regardless of his location at the time of cabin depressurization.

(e) Passenger cabin occupants. When the airplane is operating at flight altitudes above 10,000 feet, the following supply of oxygen must be provided for the use of passenger cabin occupants:

(1) When an airplane certificated to operate at flight altitudes up to and including flight level 250, can at any point along the route to be flown, descend safely to a flight altitude of 14,000 feet or less within four minutes, oxygen must be available at the rate prescribed by this part for a 30-minute period for at least 10 percent of the passenger cabin occupants.

(2) When an airplane is operated at flight altitudes up to and including flight level 250 and cannot descend safely to a flight altitude of 14,000 feet within four minutes, or when an airplane is operated at flight altitudes above flight level 250, oxygen must be available at the rate prescribed by this part for not less than 10 percent of the passenger cabin occupants for the entire flight after cabin depressurization, at cabin pressure altitudes above 10,000 feet up to and including 14,000 feet and, as applicable, to allow compliance with § 121.329(c) (2) and (3), except that there must be not less than a 10-minute supply for the passenger cabin occupants.

(3) For first-aid treatment of occupants who for physiological reasons might require undiluted oxygen following descent from cabin pressure altitudes above flight level 250, a supply of oxygen in accordance with the requirements of § 25.1443(d) must be provided for two percent of the occupants for the entire flight after cabin depressurization at cabin pressure altitudes above 8,000 feet, but in no case to less than one person. An appropriate number of acceptable dispensing units, but in no case less than two, must be provided, with a means for the cabin attendants to use this supply.

(f) Passenger briefing. Before flight is conducted above flight level 250, a crewmember shall instruct the passengers on the necessity of using oxygen in the event of cabin depressurization and shall point out to them the location and demonstrate the use of the oxygen-dispensing equipment.

[Doc. No. 6258, 29 FR 19205, Dec. 31, 1964, as amended by Amdt. 121-11, 30 FR 12466, Sept. 30, 1965; Amdt. 121-132, 41 FR 55475, Dec. 20, 1976; Amdt. 121-262, 62 FR 13256, Mar. 19, 1997; 62 FR 15570, Apr. 1, 1997]

===============================================
§ 121.329 Supplemental oxygen for sustenance: Turbine engine powered airplanes.

(a) General. When operating a turbine engine powered airplane, each certificate holder shall equip the airplane with sustaining oxygen and dispensing equipment for use as set forth in this section:

(1) The amount of oxygen provided must be at least the quantity necessary to comply with paragraphs (b) and (c) of this section.

(2) The amount of sustaining and first-aid oxygen required for a particular operation to comply with the rules in this part is determined on the basis of cabin pressure altitudes and flight duration, consistent with the operating procedures established for each operation and route.

(3) The requirements for airplanes with pressurized cabins are determined on the basis of cabin pressure altitude and the assumption that a cabin pressurization failure will occur at the altitude or point of flight that is most critical from the standpoint of oxygen need, and that after the failure the airplane will descend in accordance with the emergency procedures specified in the Airplane Flight Manual, without exceeding its operating limitations, to a flight altitude that will allow successful termination of the flight.

(4) Following the failure, the cabin pressure altitude is considered to be the same as the flight altitude unless it is shown that no probable failure of the cabin or pressurization equipment will result in a cabin pressure altitude equal to the flight altitude. Under those circumstances, the maximum cabin pressure altitude attained may be used as a basis for certification or determination of oxygen supply, or both.

(b) Crewmembers. Each certificate holder shall provide a supply of oxygen for crewmembers in accordance with the following:

(1) At cabin pressure altitudes above 10,000 feet, up to and including 12,000 feet, oxygen must be provided for and used by each member of the flight crew on flight deck duty and must be provided for other crewmembers for that part of the flight at those altitudes that is of more than 30 minutes duration.

(2) At cabin pressure altitudes above 12,000 feet, oxygen must be provided for, and used by, each member of the flight crew on flight deck duty, and must be provided for other crewmembers during the entire flight at those altitudes.

(3) When a flight crewmember is required to use oxygen, he must use it continuously except when necessary to remove the oxygen mask or other dispenser in connection with his regular duties. Standby crewmembers who are on call or are definitely going to have flight deck duty before completing the flight must be provided with an amount of supplemental oxygen equal to that provided for crewmembers on duty other than on flight duty. If a standby crewmember is not on call and will not be on flight deck duty during the remainder of the flight, he is considered to be a passenger for the purposes of supplemental oxygen requirements.

(c) Passengers. Each certificate holder shall provide a supply of oxygen for passengers in accordance with the following:

(1) For flights at cabin pressure altitudes above 10,000 feet, up to and including 14,000 feet, enough oxygen for that part of the flight at those altitudes that is of more than 30 minutes duration, for 10 percent of the passengers.

(2) For flights at cabin pressure altitudes above 14,000 feet, up to and including 15,000 feet, enough oxygen for that part of the flight at those altitudes for 30 percent of the passengers.

(3) For flights at cabin pressure altitudes above 15,000 feet, enough oxygen for each passenger carried during the entire flight at those altitudes.
===============================================
For what it is worth, the B767/B777 chemical oxygen generators on the B767/B777 have longer generation times at 22 min mimimum. I'm not sure if that is an ETOPS requirement because the B757 is ETOPS certified and it only has 12 min. And all the aircraft have just about the same service ceiling.


User currently offlineAlitis From United States of America, joined Apr 2000, 259 posts, RR: 0
Reply 2, posted (11 years 6 months 2 weeks 6 days 22 hours ago) and read 3646 times:

Thanks for the detailed reply (amazing detail)!

-alitis


Top Of Page
Forum Index

Reply To This Topic Oxygen Tanks
Username:
No username? Sign up now!
Password: 


Forgot Password? Be reminded.
Remember me on this computer (uses cookies)
  • Tech/Ops related posts only!
  • Not Tech/Ops related? Use the other forums
  • No adverts of any kind. This includes web pages.
  • No hostile language or criticizing of others.
  • Do not post copyright protected material.
  • Use relevant and describing topics.
  • Check if your post already been discussed.
  • Check your spelling!
  • DETAILED RULES
Add Images Add SmiliesPosting Help

Please check your spelling (press "Check Spelling" above)


Similar topics:More similar topics...
Usage Of Center Tanks On B737 posted Tue Dec 12 2006 18:21:15 by A300605R
Conversion From Tip Tanks To Wet Wing? posted Mon Sep 11 2006 22:50:37 by A342
Pax Oxygen On Airliners. posted Tue Jan 31 2006 04:44:58 by Tg 747-300
BBJ With "wet" Belly Tanks? posted Sat Dec 3 2005 21:47:08 by Boeing nut
How Do Airliners Get Oxygen At 30k Ft? posted Wed Nov 9 2005 21:16:51 by Quickmover
DHC-2 Beaver Fuel Tanks? posted Sun Oct 30 2005 21:10:46 by Mr Spaceman
Oxygen Masks In 747 Flight Deck posted Tue Sep 13 2005 07:30:21 by TG992
Privatair's BBJ2 Tanks posted Tue Sep 13 2005 00:18:05 by SWISSER
737-200 Number Of Fuel Tanks posted Wed Sep 7 2005 20:16:12 by ArniePie
Oxygen Masks - Do They Always Work? posted Tue Jul 26 2005 04:10:56 by Wayfarer

Sponsor Message:
Printer friendly format