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Now That I'm A CFI, Can I....?  
User currently offlineNormalSpeed From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Posted (11 years 9 months 3 weeks 6 days 11 hours ago) and read 1967 times:

Now that I'm a CFI, can I fly an airplane solo from the right seat? I should know this, but I don't recall ever reading anything in the FARs or my CFI textbooks that indicated one way or the other.

'Speed

12 replies: All unread, jump to last
 
User currently offlineKAUSpilot From United States of America, joined Jan 2002, 1963 posts, RR: 32
Reply 1, posted (11 years 9 months 3 weeks 6 days 11 hours ago) and read 1954 times:

I think anyone can fly from the right side solo if they so desire, correct me if I'm wrong, I might be way off.

User currently offlineB747skipper From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 2, posted (11 years 9 months 3 weeks 6 days 11 hours ago) and read 1948 times:

Why not... and fly it for the rear seat if you have long legs...
Regulations dont really cover seat occupancy rules for pilot... but dont forget to put your seat belt ON, that - is in the regulations  Smile
xxx
(s) Skipper


User currently offlineFlyf15 From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 3, posted (11 years 9 months 3 weeks 6 days 11 hours ago) and read 1944 times:

Yep, as far as I know, even students soloing can technically fly from the right seat. Not to say this is necessarily alright with the insurance companies though.

User currently offlineXFSUgimpLB41X From United States of America, joined Aug 2000, 4229 posts, RR: 37
Reply 4, posted (11 years 9 months 3 weeks 6 days 10 hours ago) and read 1932 times:

Legally.. youre cool. As far as for rental purposes, most companies dont like renters to fly from the right see, or dont allow it for that matter. I used to do it anyways though, for the practice.  Smile


Chicks dig winglets.
User currently offlineB747skipper From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 5, posted (11 years 9 months 3 weeks 6 days 10 hours ago) and read 1932 times:

The "left seat" occupancy by the pilot (in command) of - transport planes - is sometimes mandated by (some) airline policies, but as far as regulations, by accessibility of some controls which are only accessible from the LH seat...
xxx
As an example the steering of the nose wheel on the 707 was originally on the LH side of the pilot (in command) station... however, some airlines, i.e. Qantas, ordered their 707-338Bs to be equipped with a tiller on the RH side as well, so the co pilot could steer the airplane. Here in Argentina, a captain can sit in the left or in the right hand seat if he so wishes... no restrictions, the 747 has a tiller on both sides...
xxx
Happy contrails  Smile
(s) Skipper


User currently offlineB747skipper From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 6, posted (11 years 9 months 3 weeks 6 days 10 hours ago) and read 1925 times:

...forgot to mention - why not...
xxx
My first solo was, when I was a cadet pilot, in a J3C Piper Cub... solo flying in that aircraft was from the BACK seat (tandem seats) ...
(s) Skipper


User currently offlineJhooper From United States of America, joined Dec 2001, 6206 posts, RR: 12
Reply 7, posted (11 years 9 months 3 weeks 6 days 10 hours ago) and read 1907 times:

Be careful, some aircraft don't have brakes on the right side. (i.e. PA-23)

(in which case you definitely don't want to solo from the right seat.)

[Edited 2003-02-27 08:16:54]


Last year 1,944 New Yorkers saw something and said something.
User currently offlineJhooper From United States of America, joined Dec 2001, 6206 posts, RR: 12
Reply 8, posted (11 years 9 months 3 weeks 6 days 9 hours ago) and read 1881 times:

By the way, congratulations on passing your checkride. Do you care to tell us how it went?


Last year 1,944 New Yorkers saw something and said something.
User currently offlineNormalSpeed From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 9, posted (11 years 9 months 3 weeks 6 days 1 hour ago) and read 1769 times:

"Be careful, some aircraft don't have brakes on the right side. (i.e. PA-23)"

Here's something interesting about that: I did a lot of my CFI training in a Piper Arrow II (PA-28R-200). As some of you may know, the 200s only have toe brakes on the left side. But my instructor, who was sitting in the left seat, wouldn't touch the brakes for me--he made me use the hand brake. Anyway, I got used to taxiing with doing a lot of braking. It's surprising how little braking you can get away with during taxi.

"By the way, congratulations on passing your checkride. Do you care to tell us how it went?"

Thanks. The checkride actually went really well. Which is not to say that it went perfectly. I messed up a few minor things. But I was able to pass the first time through, which I guess is something of an accomplishment. In fact, I was the only one out of three applicants from our college to pass the first time. It's not that I'm a better pilot than they were. It's just that I studied my rear end off, and maybe those other guys didn't.

'Speed



User currently offlineEssentialpowr From United States of America, joined Sep 2000, 1820 posts, RR: 2
Reply 10, posted (11 years 9 months 3 weeks 6 days 1 hour ago) and read 1761 times:

The right seat is where you'll probably be in your first "real" job...so do all you can to get comfortable there!

User currently offlineJetguy From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 11, posted (11 years 9 months 3 weeks 6 days ago) and read 1729 times:

You can fly the airplane from any seat from which you can reach and properly manipulate all of the flight controls. It is by custom, not mandate, that the PIC typically flys fixed wing aircraft from the LH seat. (The PIC in helicopters, again by custom, not mandate, usually flys from the RH seat.) Not all F/W aircraft are flown from the LH seat, a friend of mine has a Sai Marchetti 260 (The spelling is probably way off.), a beautiful Italian sportplane that is flown from the RH seat.

Jetguy


User currently offlineThirtyEcho From United States of America, joined Dec 2001, 1659 posts, RR: 1
Reply 12, posted (11 years 9 months 3 weeks 5 days 21 hours ago) and read 1699 times:

I have known several FBOs who required a right seat checkout before renting to a person who intended to fly right seat with a passenger in the left seat. It seems that this was a way to prevent a non-CFI from giving flight instruction and all claimed that it was required by insurance regulations.

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