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Questions For Pilots.  
User currently offlineFlyboy80 From United States of America, joined Jul 2001, 1878 posts, RR: 3
Posted (11 years 5 months 3 weeks 5 days 2 hours ago) and read 2759 times:

Hi I'm 14 and I just had a few questions I wanted to ask, I would asume pilots would be more knowledgable to answer them.
First off, In aircraft (commerical aircraft) there is something usually labled VS, I would assume, Virtical speed is what it stands for. I was wondering how this works. Can you punch in a vertical speed that you want to desend or ascend at, and the aircraft does the rest?
Theres also a heading hold switch, what does this do. Does it only hold the specific heading, or can you say, punch in a heading prior to take off that you plan to turn to once airborn? Do all aircraft have a specific V1, Vr, and V2 speeds, despite the the weight? When are plaps used for takeoff? I've noticed in flight simulators on aircraft such as the Lear 45 jet that on the throttle there is a setting T/O For take off for you to use on take off. But I thought that it would depend on weight and so on for dictating your throttle/power setting.
When arriving to an airport on finals is everything pre planed, such as where the throttle must be, and how far the flaps should be extended? I would think this probably depends on the weight and balance as well.
ANother thing. when turning in an aircraft, say after take off, what is used to insure that the aircraft does not turn to wide, or to tight?
Last is trim, I dont understand trim, for instance when bringing a plane to the right climb angle your then supposed to trim it, I dont get this, does the trim just keep the aircraft at that climb angle? And how do you know where to stop turning that trim wheel (or whatever you'd like to call it)? I've got a lot more questions. But thats enough for now. Also if any pilots want to answer these questions thru e-mail to me, and have me reply back and fourth visa versa, then thats ok (see profile) I will also be checking this post! THanks a
lot!

10 replies: All unread, jump to last
 
User currently offlineDe727ups From United States of America, joined Nov 2000, 814 posts, RR: 13
Reply 1, posted (11 years 5 months 3 weeks 5 days 1 hour ago) and read 2726 times:

Sup....I would be happy to answer your questions as best a can. Bear in mind I fly a low tech Boeing 727 and even lower tech Cessna 152. I assume your questions are based on flying a computer fight sim...something I have only crashed......

"Can you punch in a vertical speed that you want to desend or ascend at, and the aircraft does the rest?"

You can do that on a plane with a high tech autopilot...like a 757. The 727 autopilot allows you to adjust pitch with the pitch controller but you have to set it yourself by moving a knob...no preset vertical speed.

Heading hold is an autopilot function that makes the plane fly straight ahead. With a high tech autopilot I suppose you could preselect a heading and push a button to make the plane turn but we don't do it that way on my airplane.

V speeds are used for large aircraft and are based on weight.

Different flap settings can be based on takeoff weight and runway length....and is at pilot preference within those parameters.

Trim is about airspeed. You trim for a certain airspeed. Set your pitch trim to give you a constant climb speed and the airplane should stay at that pitch attitude hands off...at least in theory.

Feel free to email me with more questions.

Later








User currently offlinePositive rate From Australia, joined Sep 2001, 2143 posts, RR: 1
Reply 2, posted (11 years 5 months 3 weeks 5 days ago) and read 2695 times:

De727ups you serious?? I thought the 727 had Heading Hold function at least. So does that mean everytime ATC gives you a HDG vector you have to hand fly the plane??? What about Auto approach/AutoLand capability, does the 727 have that??

thanks


User currently offlineXFSUgimpLB41X From United States of America, joined Aug 2000, 4195 posts, RR: 37
Reply 3, posted (11 years 5 months 3 weeks 5 days ago) and read 2694 times:

+ Rate= I believe he said that the airplane has heading hold, but it doesnt have a function to turn to a heading after climbing through a specific altitude. I'm sure the 72 can capture and ILS and hold it down the chute... I'm doubtful about autoland, though.

Don- Do ya'll have any type of RNAV like INS or anything where you can sequence your flight plan waypoints? Been a while since we've emailed, how are things?



Chicks dig winglets.
User currently onlineAAR90 From United States of America, joined Jan 2000, 3471 posts, RR: 47
Reply 4, posted (11 years 5 months 3 weeks 4 days 13 hours ago) and read 2627 times:

Understand that every airplane can be different and different customers can customize their airplanes different from any others. That said, here's some generalities to your questions:

First off, In aircraft (commerical aircraft) there is something usually labled VS, I would assume, Virtical speed is what it stands for. I was wondering how this works. Can you punch in a vertical speed that you want to desend or ascend at, and the aircraft does the rest?

Correct. This is an autopilot function. One can set/change the desired rate of vertical speed (normally feet per minute) and the autopilot will attempt to maintain that setting.

Theres also a heading hold switch, what does this do. Does it only hold the specific heading, or can you say, punch in a heading prior to take off that you plan to turn to once airborn?

Heading Hold does what it says.... hold the heading. The two "logic" modes I've used are (1) hold the heading displayed in the window; and (2) roll out of a turn and hold the resultant heading.

Heading Select is a different mode that normally uses the same Heading window, but has a different method of engagement (different pushbutton or pull a knob). When engaged, Heading select will turn the plane (normally shortest direction) to the displayed heading and then hold that heading.

Do all aircraft have a specific V1, Vr, and V2 speeds, despite the the weight?

V-speeds vary with gross weight, runway length and all environmental parameters (i.e. the weather)--just to name a few things.

When are plaps used for takeoff?

When required or desired.

I've noticed in flight simulators on aircraft such as the Lear 45 jet that on the throttle there is a setting T/O For take off for you to use on take off. But I thought that it would depend on weight and so on for dictating your throttle/power setting.

Normally the actual T/O setting is variable and is set using a Thrust Management Computer (or something similar).

When arriving to an airport on finals is everything pre planed, such as where the throttle must be, and how far the flaps should be extended? I would think this probably depends on the weight and balance as well.

One attempts to preplan as much as possible. When things change at the last minute, it is easier to adjust from a plan than to create a plan from scratch. At AA, we brief the planned approach, runway, airplane configuration and speeds.

ANother thing. when turning in an aircraft, say after take off, what is used to insure that the aircraft does not turn to wide, or to tight?

One normally turns at the "standard rate" which is what all published procedures are designed for. You'll learn what "standard rate" is as you learn to fly Instrument Flight Rules.

Last is trim, I dont understand trim, for instance when bringing a plane to the right climb angle your then supposed to trim it, I dont get this, does the trim just keep the aircraft at that climb angle? And how do you know where to stop turning that trim wheel (or whatever you'd like to call it)?

Basically one normally "trims" to a "hands-off" condition when expecting to maintain the plane's present situation for any extended period of time. One would not want to physically hold the plane's nose attitude with the yoke for hours on end.... at least most folks don't want to.  Big thumbs up

All this stuff you'll learn quickly (and early) in any pilot training program. Specifics (i.e. trim questions) are best discussed after you've started pilot training as descriptions are pretty difficult if you have no reference point to relate to.



*NO CARRIER* -- A Naval Aviator's worst nightmare!
User currently offlineAlmbluzman From United States of America, joined Dec 1999, 182 posts, RR: 1
Reply 5, posted (11 years 5 months 3 weeks 4 days 9 hours ago) and read 2579 times:

damn, i love de727ups' posts! he rules the freakin' school!

almbluzman


User currently offlineDe727ups From United States of America, joined Nov 2000, 814 posts, RR: 13
Reply 6, posted (11 years 5 months 3 weeks 1 day 12 hours ago) and read 2413 times:

Sorry for ignoring you guys. I don't come around here as much as I should...

"I thought the 727 had Heading Hold function at least. So does that mean everytime ATC gives you a HDG vector you have to hand fly the plane??? What about Auto approach/AutoLand capability, does the 727 have that??"

I should have been more specific. On the F/O's side (that would be me...) we have only this knob called a turn controller to use. The turn controller can change headings and it will also pitch the nose up or down if the altitude hold is off. So...if ATC gave me a heading change I'd turn the knob and the plane would start turning...when I got to the right heading, I'd center the knob and the wings would level. I have no way to preselect a heading, though. The Capts side has a heading bug on his HSI that the autopilot will track....it doesn't work on my side. We don't have altitude preselect, either. You have to use the pitch part of the turn knob to level off and then you can flip on the altitude hold. The good news is that we have dual GPS's that the autopilot can track a course on and it does a great job except for sharp turns. As far as an ILS approach coupler, it has one but we don't use them anymore. Back in the days when we did use them you have to be careful. Sometimes they would get kinda wild and crazy on you and there was also a procedure where you had to click the approach coupler off and back on again and 1500 feet to resensitize it. Now we have a heads up display on the Capts side that allows for hand flown Cat111A ILS's down to 700RVR....so we don't use the autopilots for approaches anymore. The F/O isn't even supposed to look outside during landing on one of those approaches but stays inside and calls any localizer deviations to keep the Capt on the runway centerline. It's hard to not look outside...once in the sim I called runway in sight and then remembered I wasn't supposed to look outside...whooops....

The cool thing about the 727 autopilot is when you turn it on, you hear this loud click under the floor where a big clutch grabs the control cables and gives flight control function to the autopilot....really old school stuff but it works.

XFSU...I'm going to an Audio A/Mercy Me concert tonight. How's the CFIing going, I take it you graduated now. I've been working a trip between Seattle and Vancouver BC lately, my record is 25 minutes flight time. Just bought a 152 aerobat and want to learn aerobatics and maybe get involved with some flight training on the side.



User currently offlineI LOVE EWR From United States of America, joined Jan 2002, 852 posts, RR: 8
Reply 7, posted (11 years 5 months 3 weeks 13 hours ago) and read 2336 times:

De727ups, I have read some of your posts over the past and let me tell you as someone who wants to fly professionally one day, I have really learned a lot from them! I for one appreciate your time spent here on this board. I wish we can get more pilots on here but I completely understand why some are turned away quickly when they are on here  Big grin.

Anyway I have a UPS OPS question for you. Why does UPS send a 727 up to YVR from SEA? That may sound like a stupid question but I have flown and driven that route before and even though it is quite a scenic flight, I don't understand why UPS would send a plane on that short route between two cities when it can be driven with a truck in 3-4 hours with little traffic. I am sorry if the question is stupid but I was just curious. Thanks again for the help!!!


User currently offlineDe727ups From United States of America, joined Nov 2000, 814 posts, RR: 13
Reply 8, posted (11 years 5 months 2 weeks 6 days 13 hours ago) and read 2254 times:

We have to fly it because 3 to 4 hours doesn't cut it in the world of overnight freight. Some classes of freight have an 8am guarantee and others are 1030am...meaning it has to be delivered by that time or supposedly the customer doesn't have to pay for it. I know systemwide, some of our second day air freight is trucked, and they will use trucks whenever possible if they can get away with it and still make service.

User currently offlineSaab2000 From Switzerland, joined Jun 2001, 1610 posts, RR: 11
Reply 9, posted (11 years 5 months 2 weeks 5 days 23 hours ago) and read 2193 times:

De727UPS - I too have found many of your postings to be interesting. I have found out too that you have opinions regarding unions, and pay-to-fly programs...  Smile/happy/getting dizzy No problems!

Anyway, it is interesting to hear about the operations of a 727. I fly for SWISS in Europe on the Saab 2000. Our airplane is probably in many ways much more advanced, but I have also always been interested in the "classics" - DC-8, 707 and 727 among others.

We also use a head-up display for the captain to handfly Cat IIIA approaches. It is very accurate and like you, I am also supposed to only be looking inside. Of course, like you said, it is hard NOT to take a peek for the runway sometimes!

Regarding the autopilot - ours will fly a specific vertical speed, but it is dangerous to think that the rest is taken care of! Obviously, if you are flying a certain vertical speed the power, and consequently airspeed will bleed off slowly (or run away - depending on whether you are climbing or descending). We generally climb in vertical speed, trying to maintain a constant airspeed. But of course, we can climp in IAS as well. We almost always descend with the vertical speed mode. The altitude pre-select that we have is very good. It sounds as though the 727 autopilot requires a lot more pilot involvement. This is a good thing. With ours it is too easy to let the plane fly itself.

Nice topic!



smrtrthnu
User currently offlineRick767 From United Kingdom, joined Jan 2000, 2662 posts, RR: 51
Reply 10, posted (11 years 5 months 2 weeks 5 days 16 hours ago) and read 2165 times:

It is always interesting to read about the procedures in the more "clockwork" cockpits which still occupy our skies. Particularly since the only heavy jet aircraft I have operated is much more modern with EFIS / FMC / AFDS etc...

Some of our older Captains have experience on BAC 1-11s, 727s and the first 737-200s and they doubt their abilites to go back and learn it all again from the "world apart" 757 equipment. Then there's the Airbus of course, another leap in technology.

It has always been a dream of mine to fly the DC-10 or L-1011 which were my favourite aircraft since being a kid, but the likelyhood of that ever happening now is minimal  Sad

Not sure that I could hack it now anyway, considering I complain whenever we have to fly with just the Autothrottle u/s!!  Laugh out loud



I used to love the smell of Jet-A in the morning...
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