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Aircraft "Packs"  
User currently offlineKaddyuk From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Posted (11 years 8 months 4 weeks 1 day 15 hours ago) and read 18597 times:

Okay, may seem like a dumb question to some,

On an aircraft, I often hear "the packs" referenced.

I know they have something to do with the air conditioning system

can anyone please explain to me why they are called packs, what they do and how they work  Smile.

Thanx Big grin

11 replies: All unread, jump to last
 
User currently offlineM717 From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 1, posted (11 years 8 months 4 weeks 1 day 15 hours ago) and read 18568 times:

Maybe urban legend, or maybe fact...

but, I heard they are called PACKs because it is an acronym for Pneumatic Air Conditioning Kit.


User currently offlineBR715-A1-30 From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 2, posted (11 years 8 months 4 weeks 1 day 15 hours ago) and read 18566 times:

M717, That is what an AirTran captain told me. He calls them PACS though. (Pneumatic Air Conditioning System), but he said PACKs means Pneumatic Air Conditioning Kits

User currently offlineCovert From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 3, posted (11 years 8 months 4 weeks 1 day 14 hours ago) and read 18563 times:

My man, take a looksee through these old threads, learn a thing or two about these pack thingys...

http://www.airliners.net/discussions/tech_ops/read.main/47968/
http://www.airliners.net/discussions/tech_ops/read.main/54792/
http://www.airliners.net/discussions/tech_ops/read.main/55007/
http://www.airliners.net/discussions/tech_ops/read.main/58546/

covert


User currently offlineM717 From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 4, posted (11 years 8 months 4 weeks 1 day 14 hours ago) and read 18556 times:

BR715-A1-30,

Then I guess all AirTran captains think alike.  Smile


User currently offlineKaddyuk From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 5, posted (11 years 8 months 4 weeks 1 day 14 hours ago) and read 18561 times:

Thanx m8  Smile

I am starting an apprenticeship with Virgin Atlantic in september and I dont wanna look like a doofus when asked these simple questions lol


User currently offlineLiamksa From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 6, posted (11 years 8 months 4 weeks 1 day 9 hours ago) and read 18493 times:

This is a straight copy & paste courtesy of Cdfmxtech

Pressurization and
Air
Conditioning
Kit

http://www.airliners.net/discussions/tech_ops/read.main/56247/  Smile


User currently offlineLstc From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 7, posted (11 years 8 months 4 weeks 1 day 8 hours ago) and read 18489 times:

Very old aircraft maintenance manuals referred to the air conditioning "packages". It has been shortened to "pac" or "pack" since then. The air conditioning system has little directly to do with pressurization control. So when we refer to the packs we DO NOT mean the outflow valves or associated pressure controller(s).

The urban legend comes from younger guys making up acronyms to quell curiosity.

 Smile


User currently offlineAaron atp From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 8, posted (11 years 8 months 4 weeks 1 day 7 hours ago) and read 18478 times:

where the real information is...
http://www.airliners.net/discussions/tech_ops/read.main/27236/4/
http://www.airliners.net/discussions/tech_ops/read.main/31097/4/


User currently offlineCovert From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 9, posted (11 years 8 months 4 weeks 1 day 7 hours ago) and read 18473 times:

Goodness Aaron, whatever happened to such technical discussions? That one thread was over 200 posts! It has seemed like we have lost something lately here.....

covert


User currently offline737doctor From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 10, posted (11 years 8 months 4 weeks 1 day 4 hours ago) and read 18456 times:

If you don't want to wade through the 200+ posts in that ACM pissing contest above, I will give you a more condensed version as it applies to the 737-700, which has two packs (one on each side) located in the A/C bays on the belly of the aircraft forward of the main gear wheel wells.

It's important to note that there other important components that work with the pack, in order to provide temperature control.

First of all, you must have a bleed air source (either from your engines or APU)and a means of control.

When you turn on a pack by placing its respective switch in either AUTO or HIGH, AC power is supplied to the air conditioning accessory unit (ACAU), located in the E&E compartment between the nose gear wheel well and forward cargo compartment. The ACAU contains the relays that control pack operation once you turn it on. The ACAU opens the flow control and shutoff valve, allowing bleed air to flow into the pack. It isn't until the air hits the turbine of the ACM that it actually does any "work"; more about that later.

The ACM has a single shaft on which you have a turbine, compressor and impeller fan. The fan helps pull air through the ram air duct (those two openings you see on the belly of the aircraft forward of the main gear wheel wells) and through the heat exchangers of which there are two, primary and secondary. Think of them as the radiator in your car, except they use ram air instead of water to cool the bleed air.

The primary heat exchanger cools the bleed air before it passes into the compressor of the ACM. The compressor increases the pressure of the air (go figure) which also increases the temperature. It then passes through the secondary heat exchanger which cools it down again before entering the turbine of the ACM. The air hits the turbine and "expands" causing the pressure and temperature to rapidly drop. Immediately downstream of the turbine is a water separator which swirls the air through a "sock", causing the condensed water to collect in a drain. This water is then sprayed into the ram air flow.

A 35 degree system prevents the water from freezing in the water separator by using some of the warm air from the primary heat exchanger through a low limit valve when a freezing condition is sensed.

The air mix valve then mixes hot bleed air and cold air from the ACM to provide the desired temperature selected in the cockpit.

Without drawing a picture, it's kind of hard to explain. I hope I helped without getting into too great of detail.


User currently offlineAaron atp From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 11, posted (11 years 8 months 3 weeks 5 days 16 hours ago) and read 18332 times:

It's not the aircraft he described, but here is the ACM from the G4 and some pics. The basic operation is the same. These are the same as the broken links in my posts to that monster thread.













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