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What Is The Purpose Of "drooping" Ailerons  
User currently offlineOlympic A-340 From United States of America, joined Apr 2000, 780 posts, RR: 10
Posted (11 years 2 weeks 19 hours ago) and read 11934 times:

After looking at some pictures of my favorite airbus planes as well as some 777/767s, I began thinking: what is the purpose (from an aerodynamic perspective) of drooping ailerons?

14 replies: All unread, jump to last
 
User currently offlineBuckfifty From Canada, joined Oct 2001, 1316 posts, RR: 20
Reply 1, posted (11 years 2 weeks 18 hours ago) and read 11871 times:

Drooping ailerons act as additional high lift devices to augment the flap during t/o's and landings. Though from my knowledge, none of the planes you mentioned above have them.

They're usually found on fighter planes or STOL aircraft. One plane I know for sure that had them was the Twin Otter.


User currently offlineFDXmech From United States of America, joined Mar 2000, 3251 posts, RR: 34
Reply 2, posted (11 years 2 weeks 17 hours ago) and read 11851 times:

In my experience the A300-600 has them.

Also, the MD11 has them, though Fedex deactivated theirs due to reliability issues.



You're only as good as your last departure.
User currently offlineGordonsmall From UK - Scotland, joined Jun 2001, 2102 posts, RR: 21
Reply 3, posted (11 years 2 weeks 17 hours ago) and read 11841 times:

The A319/20/21 all have drooping ailerons, the ailerons droop 5 degrees when the slats are extended I believe.

Not sure about the bigger Airbus aircraft or any of the Boeings though.

Regards,
Gordon.



Statistically, people who have had the most birthdays tend to live the longest.
User currently offlineFritzi From United Arab Emirates, joined Jun 2001, 2762 posts, RR: 2
Reply 4, posted (11 years 2 weeks 14 hours ago) and read 11786 times:

Just to add what Gordonsmall said:

The A330 and A340 also have drooping ailerons.



User currently offlineAJ From Australia, joined Nov 1999, 2389 posts, RR: 24
Reply 5, posted (11 years 2 weeks 12 hours ago) and read 11745 times:

"Though from my knowledge, none of the planes you mentioned above have them."
Both the 767 and 777 have inboard ailerons that droop with trailing edge flap extension.
The reason Boeing gives for drooping the 767 ailerons is to lower the nose attitude on approach for visibility and commonality with the 757's attitude.


User currently offlineUal747 From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 6, posted (11 years 2 weeks 11 hours ago) and read 11724 times:

The 777's outer ailerons also droop FYI.

UAL747


User currently offlineBuckfifty From Canada, joined Oct 2001, 1316 posts, RR: 20
Reply 7, posted (11 years 2 weeks 8 hours ago) and read 11689 times:

Ah. Learn something new everyday.

User currently offlineSaab340 From United States of America, joined Sep 2001, 320 posts, RR: 2
Reply 8, posted (11 years 2 weeks 8 hours ago) and read 11681 times:

Can someone post a picture that displays a good example of this?

Thanks
Paul


User currently offlineAJ From Australia, joined Nov 1999, 2389 posts, RR: 24
Reply 9, posted (11 years 2 weeks 7 hours ago) and read 11670 times:

Paul:

View Large View Medium
Click here for bigger photo!

Photo © Deborah Spragg
View Large View Medium
Click here for bigger photo!

Photo © Wietse de Graaf



User currently offlineSLCPilot From United States of America, joined Aug 2003, 583 posts, RR: 2
Reply 10, posted (11 years 2 weeks 6 hours ago) and read 11651 times:

I think the following picture may be a better example that shows a "drooping" aileron. One can't conclusively make that assumption from this picture; however, since it only shows one aileron and the plane might be in the process of rolling out of a turn....


View Large View Medium
Click here for bigger photo!

Photo © Alejandro Ramos Garduño



An interesting sidenote..... As a kid I remember doing a few space-A flights on a C-5A. It seems they had some wing fatigue issues, and as a result reflexed the ailerons UP six degrees in cruise to reduce the moments on the wing and the associated wing flex. I think most of the C-5As were later re-winged, but I'm not certain...

SLCPilot



I don't like to be fueled by anger, I don't like to be fooled by lust...
User currently offlineSuspen From United States of America, joined Aug 2003, 156 posts, RR: 1
Reply 11, posted (11 years 2 weeks 3 hours ago) and read 11629 times:

In 1981, C-5As started receiving new alloy wings. The program was complete by 1986.  Smile


Tower: "Cessna xxxx, state your intentions", Cessna: "To become airline pilot"
User currently offlineRydawg82 From United States of America, joined Sep 2001, 861 posts, RR: 8
Reply 12, posted (11 years 2 weeks ago) and read 11615 times:

Hey I had this same post about 2 years ago, some good info on the 767/777 == check it out...

http://airliners.net/discussions/tech_ops/read.main/24822/4/

Ryan



You can take the pup out of Alaska, but you can't take the Alaska out of the pup.
User currently offlineEjazz From United Arab Emirates, joined May 2002, 721 posts, RR: 34
Reply 13, posted (11 years 1 week 6 days 11 hours ago) and read 11515 times:

The B777 has outboard ailerons and inboard flaperons. Both droop when flaps are extended.


Etihad Girl, You're a great way to fly.
User currently offlineJBirdAV8r From United States of America, joined Jun 2001, 4489 posts, RR: 21
Reply 14, posted (11 years 1 week 5 days 10 hours ago) and read 11436 times:

Okay, to add another question into the mix...

When I was on a 764 flight I noticed the right inboard aileron deflected a few degrees upward in level flight. Is this AFCS-related? I don't think it would be, since it seemed to stay stationary.



I got my head checked--by a jumbo jet
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