Sponsor Message:
Aviation Technical / Operations Forum
My Starred Topics | Profile | New Topic | Forum Index | Help | Search 
AC 744 With No Port Wing Tip?  
User currently offlineMadViking From Canada, joined Jul 2003, 197 posts, RR: 0
Posted (11 years 4 months 6 days 19 hours ago) and read 2959 times:

Just saw AC161 depart 24R for YVR from YYZ. This 747-400 had no port side wing tip. The starboard side was clearly visible but I am 100% certain the port was not. Is this possible? She departed at approx. 11:40 EST today Aug.19. The aircraft is only 30 min. airborne as I type!

17 replies: All unread, jump to last
 
User currently offlineGoboeing From United States of America, joined Jun 2000, 2725 posts, RR: 15
Reply 1, posted (11 years 4 months 6 days 19 hours ago) and read 2940 times:

Do you mean no winglet? If this is the case, maybe someone who knows about the 747 MEL can see if a winglet is able to be MEL'd? I say this because someone mentioned that if the 767-400 is missing a winglet because of damage, the other can be removed and the flight can be continued.

Nick


User currently offlineJBirdAV8r From United States of America, joined Jun 2001, 4491 posts, RR: 21
Reply 2, posted (11 years 4 months 6 days 19 hours ago) and read 2930 times:

Goboeing,

I think there was a discussion a few months ago on this very topic, and I think the 744 winglet is a MEL'd item. I think in the case of the 744 that the other can be left attached and it can still be dispatched. As the raked wing extensions on a 764 are of a different design, they probably both need to be removed.



I got my head checked--by a jumbo jet
User currently offlineAvioniker From United States of America, joined Dec 2001, 1109 posts, RR: 11
Reply 3, posted (11 years 4 months 6 days 19 hours ago) and read 2925 times:

Actually it's in the CDL


One may educate the ignorance from the unknowing but stupid is forever. Boswell; ca: 1533
User currently offlineCdfmxtech From United States of America, joined Jul 2000, 1341 posts, RR: 26
Reply 4, posted (11 years 4 months 6 days 19 hours ago) and read 2932 times:

On the B767-400, both raed wingtips must be removed for dispatch if one is bad.

User currently offlineMadViking From Canada, joined Jul 2003, 197 posts, RR: 0
Reply 5, posted (11 years 4 months 6 days 19 hours ago) and read 2920 times:

Yes Goboeing, I meant winglet. Sitting in my office I saw with my binocs. that clearly the port side was missing yet the starboard was there. It is a clear sunny day here. No mistake!

User currently offlineRick767 From United Kingdom, joined Jan 2000, 2662 posts, RR: 51
Reply 6, posted (11 years 4 months 6 days 19 hours ago) and read 2915 times:

One winglet on a 744 can be removed and the aircraft still be dispatched. A British Airways 747-400 flew around in this condition for several weeks I recall after the starboard winglet was damaged and removed.

The fuel penalty was in the order of 4% I recall being told by those in the know.



I used to love the smell of Jet-A in the morning...
User currently offlineCitationJet From United States of America, joined Mar 2003, 2469 posts, RR: 3
Reply 7, posted (11 years 4 months 6 days 13 hours ago) and read 2836 times:

I was told by engineers at Aviation Partners that the 747-400 can be dispatched with one winglet removed.



Boeing Flown: 701,702,703;717;720;721,722;731,732,733,734,735,737,738,739;741,742,743,744,747SP;752,753;762,763;772,773.
User currently offlineN6376m From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 8, posted (11 years 4 months 6 days 12 hours ago) and read 2819 times:

In addition to the weight penalty, does the missing winglet cause any other adverse control conditions (i.e. adverse yaw)?

User currently offlineGoboeing From United States of America, joined Jun 2000, 2725 posts, RR: 15
Reply 9, posted (11 years 4 months 6 days 11 hours ago) and read 2817 times:

It seems like the plane should yaw towards the wingtip with the winglet missing, since there would be slightly more drag. But would this be noticeable, does anyone know?

Nick


User currently offlineJBirdAV8r From United States of America, joined Jun 2001, 4491 posts, RR: 21
Reply 10, posted (11 years 4 months 6 days 11 hours ago) and read 2807 times:

Alright, alright Avioniker...you got me on a technicality.... Smile/happy/getting dizzy

Yes, I suppose as an airplane with one winglet is certainly in a different configuration than one with two winglets, then the item would be on the CDL (or for those not versed in technical abbreviations, the Configuration Deviation List).

 Big thumbs up



I got my head checked--by a jumbo jet
User currently offlineSuspen From United States of America, joined Aug 2003, 156 posts, RR: 1
Reply 11, posted (11 years 4 months 6 days 11 hours ago) and read 2802 times:

'bout time someone posted the famous missing winglet pic... Yes the 744 can fly with only one and someone got it on film  Smile
View Large View Medium
Click here for bigger photo!

Photo © Yo Tanaka




Tower: "Cessna xxxx, state your intentions", Cessna: "To become airline pilot"
User currently offlineCitationJet From United States of America, joined Mar 2003, 2469 posts, RR: 3
Reply 12, posted (11 years 4 months 6 days 10 hours ago) and read 2796 times:

Does that make it a 747-350????


Boeing Flown: 701,702,703;717;720;721,722;731,732,733,734,735,737,738,739;741,742,743,744,747SP;752,753;762,763;772,773.
User currently offlineMadViking From Canada, joined Jul 2003, 197 posts, RR: 0
Reply 13, posted (11 years 4 months 9 hours ago) and read 2602 times:

It's aircraft 341, AC's first 744. On Sat I saw it arrive from LHR, as AC849 landing on 33L. Today, Monday it was at their hangar at Pearson but in the evening departed to Frankfurt as AC872.

User currently offlineMikeNE3 From United Kingdom, joined Aug 2003, 25 posts, RR: 0
Reply 14, posted (11 years 4 months 5 hours ago) and read 2576 times:

We flew home from Antigua (November 1998) on a BA 747-400 which had to have the port winglet removed prior to the TAPA-EGLL leg as the pilot who had flown the plane in from TLPL managed to prang the winglet on a lamp-post while taxiing to the stand at V C Bird. The pilot for the trans Atlantic leg was able to requisistion more fuel and make the journey with the starboard winglet still attached so I assume this is a standard practice when the winglet cannot be quickly replaced.

Mike


User currently offlineAaron747 From Japan, joined Aug 2003, 8289 posts, RR: 26
Reply 15, posted (11 years 3 months 4 weeks 1 day 21 hours ago) and read 2538 times:

Any increase in drag on the port side could easily be trimmed out. It's not a problem.


If you need someone to blame / throw a rock in the air / you'll hit someone guilty
User currently offlineN243NW From United States of America, joined Jul 2003, 1640 posts, RR: 20
Reply 16, posted (11 years 3 months 4 weeks 1 day 18 hours ago) and read 2503 times:

Here are some more pictures of 747-350s  Laugh out loud. As you can see, it is not uncommon for 744s to fly around while one winglet is in for repairs.

View Large View Medium
Click here for bigger photo!

Photo © Chris Coduto



View Large View Medium
Click here for bigger photo!

Photo © Christopher Smay



View Large View Medium
Click here for bigger photo!

Photo © Christopher Smay


-N243NW Big grin



B-52s don't take off. They scare the ground away.
User currently offlineOE-LDA From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 17, posted (11 years 3 months 4 weeks 1 day 17 hours ago) and read 2510 times:

Correct me if I am wrong, but an idea just came to my mind:

If there is only a winglet on the right wind, the parasite drag will create a momentum (yaw) to the right side. But with the winglet on the right wing the induced drag on this wing is reduced, which will create a momentum to the left. Now which momentum will be larger depends on the airspeed. The larger the airspeed, the more should the momentum be to the right side, as the parasite drag (to the right) increases with airspeed, and the induced drag (to the left) decreases with airspeed.

I know, that's a wild theory. Now where are the flight instructors to falsify it?

Regards anyway, OE-LDA


Top Of Page
Forum Index

Reply To This Topic AC 744 With No Port Wing Tip?
Username:
No username? Sign up now!
Password: 


Forgot Password? Be reminded.
Remember me on this computer (uses cookies)
  • Tech/Ops related posts only!
  • Not Tech/Ops related? Use the other forums
  • No adverts of any kind. This includes web pages.
  • No hostile language or criticizing of others.
  • Do not post copyright protected material.
  • Use relevant and describing topics.
  • Check if your post already been discussed.
  • Check your spelling!
  • DETAILED RULES
Add Images Add SmiliesPosting Help

Please check your spelling (press "Check Spelling" above)


Similar topics:More similar topics...
Pressurization With No Fuel? posted Mon Oct 9 2006 16:20:45 by Kalvado
Reverse Thrust With No Cowl Movement: How? posted Thu Apr 8 2004 01:16:22 by Aguilo
Seats With No Windows: Why? posted Wed Apr 7 2004 16:41:26 by Aguilo
What Is The Deal With The Extended Wing Fairings? posted Mon Apr 5 2004 13:13:15 by L-188
757 Stop With No Reverser? posted Wed Mar 24 2004 21:14:04 by Joerock7415
Engines With No Accessory Drives. posted Tue Mar 23 2004 16:58:04 by EconoBoy
Wing Tip Strobes On Passenger Aircraft.. posted Wed Feb 11 2004 19:17:30 by AA777-200
Wing Tip Strobe Lights On Passenger Planes... posted Tue Feb 10 2004 06:56:00 by AA777-200
Running The APU With No Discharge Bottles? posted Fri Oct 31 2003 15:18:55 by Bio15
Takeoff With No Flaps Extended, Is It Posible? posted Fri Sep 19 2003 20:29:10 by Capri

Sponsor Message:
Printer friendly format