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Canadair Regional Jets 100 & 200  
User currently offlineBruce From United States of America, joined May 1999, 5042 posts, RR: 16
Posted (10 years 10 months 2 weeks 3 days 13 hours ago) and read 3801 times:

What is the difference between a CRJ-100 and a CRJ-200? and the "ER" and "LR"? I have noticed that unlike other jet types where the 100 was followed by the 200, there is no order to the CRJs. There are some new 100s and new 200s so how are they making two different models at once?

I know the 700 is really quite different, and I even heard of a CRJ-440 which I found out was just 44 seats but I cant seem to find a difference between a 100 and 200. Is there any visual way to tell?


bruce


Bruce Leibowitz - Jackson, MS (KJAN) - Canon 50D/100-400L IS lens
5 replies: All unread, jump to last
 
User currently offlineLstc From Canada, joined Jun 2003, 320 posts, RR: 0
Reply 1, posted (10 years 10 months 2 weeks 3 days 4 hours ago) and read 3692 times:

The actual model designation for all CRJs is a CL600-2B19. The difference between a 100 and 200 is the engine. The Type Certificate contains this note:

The RJ200 is a marketing designation for the Regional Jet Series 100 aircraft
with the General Electric CF-34-3B1 engines installed and is identified as
RJ100 in this TCDS. All Airworthiness Directives issued against any 100
Series aircraft are similarly applicable to the 200 Series.


So as far as certification and model numbers go, There is no real difference between the 100 and 200 and beyond marketing, there's no such thing.

The series "440" version, has a maximum seating capacity of 44 pax versus the 50 pax of the "100" series.

Bombardier has the following information on their website with respect to the other model designations:

Bombardier Aerospace currently offers three versions of the CRJ200. The standard Bombardier CRJ200 has a maximum take-off weight of 47,450 pounds (21,523 kg) and a range of 987 nm (1,825 km). The Extended Range (ER) variant has a maximum take-off weight of 51,000 pounds (23,134 kg) and range of 1,645 nm (3,045 km). The Long Range (LR) model has a maximum take-off weight of 53,000 pounds (24,041 kg) and a range of 2,005 nm (3,713 km).

There's also an "SE" version that is offered as a business aircraft.



User currently offlineBruce From United States of America, joined May 1999, 5042 posts, RR: 16
Reply 2, posted (10 years 10 months 2 weeks 3 days 3 hours ago) and read 3656 times:

2000 miles! yikes! I wonder how Bombardier expects to sell such an aircraft! I cannot imagine spending 4 hours in that little tube!


bruce



Bruce Leibowitz - Jackson, MS (KJAN) - Canon 50D/100-400L IS lens
User currently offlineN777UA From United States of America, joined Mar 2010, 0 posts, RR: 0
Reply 3, posted (10 years 10 months 2 weeks 3 days 2 hours ago) and read 3623 times:

As far as regional jets go, the Canadair does have a rather roomy cabin.

User currently offlineLstc From Canada, joined Jun 2003, 320 posts, RR: 0
Reply 4, posted (10 years 10 months 2 weeks 3 days 2 hours ago) and read 3626 times:

The added range is advantageous when you service smaller cities. It means that you don't have to worry about refueling at every stop. It speeds turn-arounds and you can take advantage of fueling at airports where fuel is less expensive or extending service where Jet Fuel isn't available.

Of course this sort of thing isn't as common in the US as it is in Canada and some other regions in the world.


User currently offlineJBirdAV8r From United States of America, joined Jun 2001, 4488 posts, RR: 22
Reply 5, posted (10 years 10 months 2 weeks 1 day 12 hours ago) and read 3478 times:

The added range is advantageous when you service smaller cities. It means that you don't have to worry about refueling at every stop. It speeds turn-arounds and you can take advantage of fueling at airports where fuel is less expensive or extending service where Jet Fuel isn't available.

It's also helpful for quick turnarounds at outstations, kind of like loading two flights' worth of Coke and peanuts at CVG and sending the airplane out.  Smile/happy/getting dizzy



I got my head checked--by a jumbo jet
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