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Boeing 757/767 Illuminating?  
User currently offlineTarzanboy From United States of America, joined Sep 2003, 132 posts, RR: 0
Posted (11 years 2 months 1 week 21 hours ago) and read 3383 times:

hi...

just curious...is there a warning light in the cockpit of the 757 or 767 that tells the crew that the tail had striked the ground??

6 replies: All unread, jump to last
 
User currently offlineM717 From United States of America, joined Dec 2002, 608 posts, RR: 4
Reply 1, posted (11 years 2 months 1 week 21 hours ago) and read 3361 times:

Not on any 757 that I have flown. You must visually inspect the tail section from the outside.

User currently offlineFSPilot747 From United States of America, joined Oct 1999, 3599 posts, RR: 12
Reply 2, posted (11 years 2 months 1 week 20 hours ago) and read 3334 times:

Tarzanboy, instead of starting all these threads about tailstrikes this tailstrikes that, just start a single thread and ask all the tailstrike questions your heart desires!

FSP


User currently offlineHAL From United States of America, joined Jan 2002, 2568 posts, RR: 53
Reply 3, posted (11 years 2 months 1 week 17 hours ago) and read 3305 times:

The 767-300 has a 'tailskid' light, but not a specific 'tailstrike' light. The 'tailskid' light comes on if the position of the retractable tailskid does not agree with the landing gear handle position.

That said, yes, it would probably come on after a tailstrike if the landing gear handle is down, since the 'up' position of the skid now disagrees with the 'down' position of the gear handle. In this plane, the most common time for a tailstrike is on landing, so if you see the light on after touchdown, most likely you did scrape the skid.

However, at Hawaiian when we first got the 767's, we had a few incidents where the skid had obviously touched the runway (scrape marks) but the light didn't come on (not hard enough to move the skid). Maintenance is required to do an inspection anyway, but there wasn't a sure-fire way to know after each flight whether or not it was a new scrape, or an old one. They first tried painting the bottom of the skid, but that came off with the coffee and hydraulic fluid that always seeps out along the bottom of the fuselage. The final answer was to wrap safety wire around the base of the skid, and make it part of the preflight inspection. Wire there = no strike. Missing wire = inspection.

HAL



One smooth landing is skill. Two in a row is luck. Three in a row and someone is lying.
User currently offlineCdfmxtech From United States of America, joined Jul 2000, 1341 posts, RR: 26
Reply 4, posted (11 years 2 months 1 week 6 hours ago) and read 3232 times:

The B757-300s have a TailStrike EICAS message. They also have the Tailskid message to show a disagree btwn ldg gear position and talskid position.

Digital Flight Mgmt software not incorporates a Pitch Report to be viewed by the flightcrews. They can check the rotation attitude once they have lifted off. (Available, but not standard I don't think).


User currently offlineTarzanboy From United States of America, joined Sep 2003, 132 posts, RR: 0
Reply 5, posted (11 years 2 months 6 days 21 hours ago) and read 3110 times:

thanks to the guys who replied with sense, who replied not being selfish....

one more thing HAL; when doing 767 groundschool and simulator training, did your instructors ever teach to initially rotate to five (5) degrees to get off the runway?

is it ok and advisable to initially rotate to 5 degrees on the 767?



User currently offlineHAL From United States of America, joined Jan 2002, 2568 posts, RR: 53
Reply 6, posted (11 years 2 months 6 days 16 hours ago) and read 3111 times:

On the 767 we are taught to rotate at 2 1/2 to 3 degrees per second to an initial pitch attitude of about 15 degrees. According to our ops manual, the liftoff should occur as we pass through 7 1/2 to 10 degrees pitch up. Then, once airborne, pitch up to maintain an airspeed of V2 + 15 knots, up to V2 + 25 knots.

It's rotating too fast that can get you in trouble with a tailstrike.

HAL



One smooth landing is skill. Two in a row is luck. Three in a row and someone is lying.
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