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Nitrogen In Aircraft Tires  
User currently offlineVS340 From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Posted (10 years 11 months 2 days 17 hours ago) and read 23465 times:

can anyone tell me why aircraft tires are filled with Nitrogen rather than just regular air?

17 replies: All unread, jump to last
 
User currently offlineAJ From Australia, joined Nov 1999, 2389 posts, RR: 24
Reply 1, posted (10 years 11 months 2 days 16 hours ago) and read 23462 times:

Nitrogen is an inert gas, so high temperatures and pressure changes have less effect, regular air contains elements that react with heat, pressure changes and oxygen and can become explosively expansive....not good in an aircraft tyre.

User currently offlineErj-145mech From United States of America, joined Oct 2001, 306 posts, RR: 1
Reply 2, posted (10 years 11 months 2 days 16 hours ago) and read 23423 times:

Also the nitrogen is more compatable with the rubber compound, and the nitrogen atoms are larger, so the deflation rate is longer.

User currently offlineV Jet From Australia, joined May 1999, 719 posts, RR: 2
Reply 3, posted (10 years 11 months 2 days 16 hours ago) and read 23416 times:

I have it in my car tyres. Driving now feels like a take off roll  Laugh out loud

User currently offlineChallengerDan From Canada, joined Sep 2003, 172 posts, RR: 0
Reply 4, posted (10 years 11 months 2 days 15 hours ago) and read 23397 times:

Aircraft tires are filled with nitrogen because it's a inert gas and therefore doesn't corrode the wheel as opposed to regular compressed air wich contains oxygen, highly corrosive.


if your flight goes MX in YUL, I might be called to fix it!
User currently offlineHa763 From United States of America, joined Jan 2003, 3656 posts, RR: 5
Reply 5, posted (10 years 11 months 2 days 15 hours ago) and read 23367 times:
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Here's an article from Boeing's Aero magazine that deals with tire/wheel servicing. It starts with a section that deals with tire/wheel explosions.

http://www.boeing.com/commercial/aeromagazine/aero_05/m/m03/index.html


User currently offlineT prop From United States of America, joined Apr 2001, 1028 posts, RR: 1
Reply 6, posted (10 years 11 months 2 days 13 hours ago) and read 23336 times:

The reasons above and it's an AD for certain aircraft.

http://www.airweb.faa.gov/Regulatory_and_Guidance_Library/rgad.nsf/0/55850E6389EFBA3C8625695B006723A3?OpenDocument&Highlight=87-08-09

http://www.casa.gov.au/aircraft/ad/adfiles/equip/whe/whe%2D004.pdf

T prop.


User currently offlineOPNLguy From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 7, posted (10 years 11 months 2 days 12 hours ago) and read 23328 times:

Here's an example of what can happen...

http://aviation-safety.net/database/1986/860331-1.htm


It should also be noted that a wheel fire is -really- something that you don't want on an aircraft, given that the wheel rims have magnesium in them. To get an idea what this stuff is like when it burns, think underwater flare.


User currently offlineLstc From Canada, joined Jun 2003, 320 posts, RR: 0
Reply 8, posted (10 years 11 months 2 days 8 hours ago) and read 23289 times:

Nitrogen is not formally an "inert" gas. It is however generally considered as such as it does not readily react with much whereas oxygen contained in normal air reacts violently with a great many compounds.

Keep in mind that nitrogen is one of the basic ingredients in many popular explosives. So with the proper mix, it breaks out of its "inert" reputation and reacts quite "explosively".

The main reason for use in aircraft tires as noted in a few instances above is that nitrogen does not react readily with the rubber compounds or metals used in tires and will not support combustion in case of a tire fire.

Nitrogen is also used as a pre-charge for various hydraulic systems in aircraft including the main acumulator and propellors.

Many maintenance procedures include instructions to inject dry nitrogen in various plumbing systems (pitot/static etc) to clean them.

Oxygen in any somewhat pure state on the other hand is very much feared in aircraft maintenance unless you are actually filling the oxygen tanks.

If you expose any type of oil or grease to pure oxygen, it will spontaneously combust (burst into flames) because the reaction with the oxygen is so violent it releases great amounts of heat.

So when oxygen is in use or if you're filling oxygen tanks, don't hang around with your oily coveralls.


User currently offlineCovert From Ghana, joined Oct 2001, 1450 posts, RR: 2
Reply 9, posted (10 years 11 months 1 day ago) and read 23114 times:

What will happen if I put it in my automobile or motorcycle tyres?


thank goodness for TCAS !
User currently offlineJetguy From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 10, posted (10 years 11 months 1 day ago) and read 23113 times:

About the only thing that will happen if you put nitrogen in automobile/motorcycle tires is your wallet will get lighter. Big grin

User currently offlineAloges From Germany, joined Jan 2006, 8705 posts, RR: 43
Reply 11, posted (10 years 11 months 23 hours ago) and read 23105 times:

"Keep in mind that nitrogen is one of the basic ingredients in many popular explosives. So with the proper mix, it breaks out of its "inert" reputation and reacts quite "explosively"."

You're correct, in a certain way. It's not the "mix" that makes the difference, but whether you have nitrogen molecules (N2) or atoms (N). The two atoms in each molecule are firmly "tied" by three pairs of electrons, which is the reason why synthesising ammonia earnt Haber and Bosch a Nobel Prize. Nitrogen atoms, which indeed are an important part of many structures of molecules of explosives, act differently.

It's somewhat comparable to the difference between molecular oxygen and oxygen "in statu nascendi".



Walk together, talk together all ye peoples of the earth. Then, and only then, shall ye have peace.
User currently offlineJetmek319 From Germany, joined Sep 2003, 199 posts, RR: 1
Reply 12, posted (10 years 11 months 23 hours ago) and read 23094 times:

Yet another reason is that Nitrogen has much less humidity content than "air".


Never, ever moon a werewolf !!
User currently offlineChief From United States of America, joined Nov 2002, 89 posts, RR: 0
Reply 13, posted (10 years 11 months 22 hours ago) and read 23082 times:

Compressed air, even in the most low humidity enviroments, contain moisture, (water). This is indeed corrosive, but can also collect in a low spot and then freeze, thus causing an out of balance situation.

User currently offlineLstc From Canada, joined Jun 2003, 320 posts, RR: 0
Reply 14, posted (10 years 11 months 22 hours ago) and read 23080 times:

Nitrogen gas can certainly be mixed with water molecules just like common "air". So nitrogen isn't dryer than air. But..."dry nitrogen" is what you get out of the tanks. No different than getting dry air if so desired.



User currently offlineL-188 From United States of America, joined Jul 1999, 29795 posts, RR: 58
Reply 15, posted (10 years 11 months 14 hours ago) and read 23030 times:

Does anybody remember the story (Or urban legend) about the two UA mechanics that had to do some work inside a DC-10 wing?

apparently they thought they would be real smart and power their air tools off the nitrogen bottle. Figured less fire hazard since they wheren't introducing air into the tank.

They ended up asphyxiating themselves inside the tank.



OBAMA-WORST PRESIDENT EVER....Even SKOORB would be better.
User currently onlineCPH-R From Denmark, joined May 2001, 5991 posts, RR: 3
Reply 16, posted (10 years 11 months 9 hours ago) and read 23007 times:

asphyxiating

And just what the heck does that mean?  Laugh out loud

It sounds like a word or action that belongs in the scurvy depths of the Non-av forum Big grin

EDIT: asphyxiating = like drowning, but without the water

[Edited 2003-10-06 14:54:36]

User currently offlineBR715-A1-30 From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 17, posted (10 years 10 months 4 weeks 1 day 22 hours ago) and read 22945 times:

I need to put some of that in my tires. Sounds like a smoother driving experience.

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