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Multiengine Checkride Advice  
User currently offlineOlympic A-340 From United States of America, joined Apr 2000, 780 posts, RR: 10
Posted (10 years 9 months 3 weeks 3 days 4 hours ago) and read 8031 times:

I have finally come to the point where it is time to take my multiengine checkride (October 7th at 9AM). I must say I am a little nervous as I did not fly at all during the summer, so some of the practical knowledge I acquired from getting my PPL is a little shady. Mostly things concerning weather and the like have been put on the backburner. I know the aspects concerning airspace and basic operation of all the systems as well as multiengine characteristics (DUH  Big grin )...but certainly little things that could easily be forgotten have been. Could someone give me any advice in preparing for this checkride?
Thanx in advance,
Olympic A-340

20 replies: All unread, jump to last
 
User currently offlineFSPilot747 From United States of America, joined Oct 1999, 3599 posts, RR: 12
Reply 1, posted (10 years 9 months 3 weeks 3 days 4 hours ago) and read 8000 times:

Checkride for your multi? Isn't that just a rating?


FSP


User currently offlineJan Mogren From Sweden, joined Dec 2000, 2043 posts, RR: 51
Reply 2, posted (10 years 9 months 3 weeks 3 days 3 hours ago) and read 7990 times:

FSP,
are you implying that flying a multi isn't complex enough to need a checkride?
/JM



AeroPresentation - Airline DVD's filmed in High Definition
User currently offlineNormalSpeed From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 3, posted (10 years 9 months 3 weeks 3 days 3 hours ago) and read 7991 times:

I'd give the same advice that I'd give anyone taking any checkride. It's the thing that is needed most, yet it's the thing that it hardest to do: RELAX! Just fly the airplane. You wouldn't be taking the checkride if you weren't ready. Just do some studying, to make sure that your mind is prepared. Get plenty of rest, and eat well.

-Normal

P.S. I still think you are better off in the long run to wait to get the multi until you get your instrument rating and commercial certificate. You are just going to have to take more checkrides than you would have otherwise. Plus, instrument training really helps you with your situational awareness. But, if you insist...

P.P.S. FSP, just because it's a rating doesn't mean that you don't have to take a checkride. In fact, every rating that I can think of (instrument, multi, type-rating, etc.,) requires a checkride. You are probably thinking of the written test. The multi-engine rating and multi-engine instructor (CFI-AME) do not require written tests. (Unless, of course, you are doing your initial CFI in a multi-engine airplane, which may be Olympic's situation unless he takes the Commerical ASEL and CFI-ASE checkrides first.) Or you may be thinking of an endorsement, such as Complex, High Altitude, High Performance, Taildragger, etc. Endorsements do not require checkrides.

[Edited 2003-10-04 18:30:53]

User currently offlineRalgha From United States of America, joined Nov 1999, 1614 posts, RR: 6
Reply 4, posted (10 years 9 months 3 weeks 3 days 2 hours ago) and read 7983 times:

I absolutely agree with NormalSpeed. If you get your multi-engine after having your commercial/instrument, then it's just one checkride, lasting about an hour (not including ground, about another hour), and you have multi-engine commercial/instrument privledges(sp?).

With most examiners, because it's an addon rating to your private ticket, the ground will mostly cover multi-engine systems and operations. Not private pilot knowledge. However, don't take my word as gospel. Talk to your instructor and find out what the examiner will be looking for.

Above all, relax and fly the airplane.

When flying a multi-engine, or any airplane, basic control of it should be almost instinctual (this comes with experience). I.E., when an engine fails, you shouldn't have to think about how to keep it going straight. The goal should be to make the instructor/examiner wonder whether the engine really failed or not!  Big thumbs up



09 F9 11 02 9D 74 E3 5B D8 41 56 C5 63 56 88 C0
User currently offlineJetguy From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 5, posted (10 years 9 months 3 weeks 3 days 1 hour ago) and read 7964 times:

Personally, I agree with NormalSpeed and Ralpha - you might be getting just a bit a head of yourself, but that's not a real problem; it's just going to cost you more money than you would otherwise need to spend. You're going to have to do it all over again when you go for your instrument/commercial and ATP. If I was your mentor, I'd recommend that you wait until you needed it to instruct or until you were ready to take your ATP checkride. The course that you've selected will require you to ultimately take several multiengine checkrides in stead of just one.

That being said, just go in and be prepared for a very thorough oral and flight check.

Jetguy


User currently offlineSushka From United States of America, joined Nov 1999, 4784 posts, RR: 14
Reply 6, posted (10 years 9 months 3 weeks 3 days 1 hour ago) and read 7954 times:

Or you could do like me. Im getting my commercial and multi in one checkride. It will save me about $350, in checkride cost, by combining the two.

Getting your commercial license in a multi does not require lazy eights, eights on pylons, chandelles, etc. just basic stuff.

Then you can go get your commercial single in something easier and less complex like a Cessna 152 or Katana.



Pershoyu Spravoyu Litaki!
User currently offlineOlympic A-340 From United States of America, joined Apr 2000, 780 posts, RR: 10
Reply 7, posted (10 years 9 months 3 weeks 3 days 1 hour ago) and read 7950 times:

Thanx for the advice guys...
I'm actually getting my multi-private, then my instrument multi (which also counts for the single), then getting my commercial license for both my multi and single, and finally my CFI ratings.

Anyhoo I'll let you guys know how I do... Smile


User currently offlineOlympic A-340 From United States of America, joined Apr 2000, 780 posts, RR: 10
Reply 8, posted (10 years 9 months 3 weeks 3 days ago) and read 7939 times:

BTW the reason why I decided to go on with the multi now was that the price of my school with respect to the multi is really hard to beat. It's 155 an hour for the Duchess 76; all the other schools that I checked out for my flying in college were in excess of 210 an hour. I've certainly gained a lot more confidence in the twin...much more so than the last time I inquired about it on the forum. Thanx for all of your help guys!

User currently offlineFlyf15 From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 9, posted (10 years 9 months 3 weeks 2 days 23 hours ago) and read 7943 times:

Thought I'd throw in my multiengine checkride insight here. Both of my multi-checkrides (Private and Commercial) were with the same examiner who I had done my single engine checkrides with. Just like I'd assume it will go for you, my examiner already knew I was a private/commercial pilot (respectively) and therefore, I didn't get too many questions regarding that type of flying on there. It was all about multiengine stuff.

My oral concentrated on Vmc, V-speeds, systems, critical engine, performance considerations (accelerate stop/go, single engine service ceiling, ...), decision making, aswell as some stuff specific to the Duchess that doesn't really fit into the other groups. This will be your first checkride in a complex airplane and your examiner will know this. So be prepared to get some gear/prop questions, in addition to being able to explain feathering/unfeathering.

In the air, it was exactly what you'd expect and exactly whats in the PTS. Engine failures (simulated and actual) during just about every different porition of the flight.

Most likely you ride will be similar....good luck!!


User currently offlineOlympic A-340 From United States of America, joined Apr 2000, 780 posts, RR: 10
Reply 10, posted (10 years 9 months 3 weeks 2 days 23 hours ago) and read 7930 times:

My instructor just called and told me who my examiner is. Flyf15, you were right it's the same examiner who did my PPL. His orals aren't too difficult, but he LOVES to fail engines on people. Apparently, I will be lucky if I can make it through one maneuver without having an engine failed.

User currently offlineSSTjumbo From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 11, posted (10 years 9 months 3 weeks 2 days 23 hours ago) and read 7927 times:

Sushka, somewhere through the grapevine I heard that the commercial rating requires that a high-performance complex aircraft be used for the ride. I COULD be mistaken though.

User currently offlineOlympic A-340 From United States of America, joined Apr 2000, 780 posts, RR: 10
Reply 12, posted (10 years 9 months 3 weeks 2 days 23 hours ago) and read 7928 times:

SSTjumbo,
I don't know if this is true, as my flight school uses their Cessna 172 aircraft for the commercial-single rating.


User currently offlineFlyf15 From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 13, posted (10 years 9 months 3 weeks 2 days 23 hours ago) and read 7919 times:

Commercial ratings require a complex (but not high performance) aircraft if they are the initial rating. If you do your Commercial Multi first (and therefore, do that ride in a complex aircraft -- although there are noncomplex multis out there, this ride has to be in a complex aircraft, be it single or multi), your Single add-on does not have to be complex.

User currently offlineWoodreau From United States of America, joined Sep 2001, 1017 posts, RR: 6
Reply 14, posted (10 years 9 months 3 weeks 2 days 15 hours ago) and read 7872 times:

I guess you gotten your standard advice....

Use your checklists.... Know your procedures cold, but do some thinking. Sometimes your procedures may not be approprate for the situation...

My examiner put me in a descending 270 degree left turn (Playing ATC, "Turn left to 180, descend to 2600") then failed my left engine in a descending turn. something my instructor never did... Always did my engine failure in straight and level... (Makes it hard to do the Mixtures Full Rich - Prop High RPM - Throttle Full - Flaps Up - Gear Up - Identify xxxx foot dead, xxxx engine dead - verify xxxx throttle idle - rectify, etc...)

So at this point you need to continue the descending turn as the controller is expecting you to turn to 180 for whatever reason. or declare the emergency... What the examiner expected me to do was to do the rectify inop engine part first (instead of identifying the engine first), fuel pumps on, fuel selectors on, etc... maybe that will clear the problem up, while continuing the turn to 180, Then after I was steady on 180, identify the inop engine.

You probably don't have to do the single engine instrument approach for private-multi...

The examiner taught me an inportant lesson on my checkride... I was doing the single-engine ILS, when I was approaching DH, I was expecting him to tell me that I had broken out. Instead, about 50ft above DH he said, "you've got the approach lights in sight, no runway yet..." I was a bit confused by that piece of info. Do I take my foggles off now? What did the examiner want me to do? Then after some considerable angst and concentration I remembered that approach lights, but no runway in sight meant I could descend below DH, but no lower than 100ft above touchdown zone elevation. I was now off the glideslope because I stopped at DH... So after a momentary hesitation, pushed over and pulled power to get back on glideslope. Then he asked what are you going to do if you don't have runway in sight now? The rock and the hard place... You don't have the power to do a go around, now you're 100ft above TDZ but can't land (legally).

He then asked, why are you even shooting the approach into an airport where weather is this low to begin with, etc... Did you consider diverting to somewhere where weather was better because you're shooting a single engine approach... Stuff I didn't consider, because I thought he just wanted me to shoot a single engine approach. Stuff that by now was almost routine with the instructor...

Best of luck on your checkride. Let us know how it goes.



Bonus animus sit, ab experientia. Quod salvatum fuerit de malis usu venit judicium.
User currently offlineFSPilot747 From United States of America, joined Oct 1999, 3599 posts, RR: 12
Reply 15, posted (10 years 9 months 3 weeks 2 days 14 hours ago) and read 7865 times:

gah, sorry my mistake. I was thinking of an endorsement.


FSP


User currently offlineOlympic A-340 From United States of America, joined Apr 2000, 780 posts, RR: 10
Reply 16, posted (10 years 9 months 2 weeks 6 days 23 hours ago) and read 7804 times:

I'm now multiengine rated guys!  Smile/happy/getting dizzy

User currently offlineFlyf15 From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 17, posted (10 years 9 months 2 weeks 6 days 22 hours ago) and read 7801 times:

Congrats Olympic A-340! Feels good, doesn't it?

User currently offlineOlympic A-340 From United States of America, joined Apr 2000, 780 posts, RR: 10
Reply 18, posted (10 years 9 months 2 weeks 6 days 22 hours ago) and read 7797 times:

It feels great indeed....to have all my work pay off like this is fabulous!
The examiner was the same guy who did my PPL, this really eccentric old guy who is a damn good pilot and full of stories. I just went in there thinking positive and being relaxed...although I was twisting a paperclip during the oral, let's just say the instructors at my school think I should go into modern sculpture instead of flying  Big grin


User currently offlineFlyf15 From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 19, posted (10 years 9 months 2 weeks 6 days 22 hours ago) and read 7795 times:

What was the checkride like? Anything you didn't expect?

User currently offlineOlympic A-340 From United States of America, joined Apr 2000, 780 posts, RR: 10
Reply 20, posted (10 years 9 months 2 weeks 6 days 22 hours ago) and read 7783 times:

Quite honestly, it was much easier than I thought. The oral went pretty well. We discussed basic systems, what the engines control (in terms of systems on the plane)-how they would be affected should an engine fail, Vmc, purpose of training for Vmc, and some basic aerodynamics. The flight test went VERY well. I took off and my examiner failed the engine on me at like 1200 feet...went through the checklist like a pro  Smile. Then we went up to somewhere around 4500' and did steep turns, slow flight which transitioned into a power off, power on stall, Vmc demo, full engine shutdown, and an emergency extension of the gear/descent. During the steep turn, emergency descent, and power on stall he failed my engine. I was prepared for all of them except during the emergency descent I couldn't tell which engine was failed. So I identified the wrong engine, but put the power back in and shutdown the correct engine. I suppose in that respect, I did it all right, since I identified the engine and figured out that it was wrong and corrected it. Then he was like "Ok let's go back to the airport..." He said he wanted to do a touch and go even though we aren't allowed to them so I figured he would just make me go-around. I was right. Next approach was a single engine landing....I think it was great except I floated a tad bit too much on the flare. So that was that  Smile/happy/getting dizzy

Now on to the instrument.....


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