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Usage Of Term "heavy"  
User currently offlineFlyguy1 From United States of America, joined Jun 1999, 1738 posts, RR: 4
Posted (10 years 11 months 3 weeks 4 days 16 hours ago) and read 2573 times:

I noticed from listening to Amsterdam ATC recently, that most of the widebody jets never use, or are referred to as heavy. Does the term heavy only get used in the USA? And do plans only use the term heavy at certain altitudes, when flying in US airspace?



727, L1011, MD80, A300, 777-200, 737-300, 737-700, 747-400, 757-200, 737-800, A320. E190, E135, 767-200, CRJ9
10 replies: All unread, jump to last
 
User currently offlineWoodreau From United States of America, joined Sep 2001, 1044 posts, RR: 6
Reply 1, posted (10 years 11 months 3 weeks 4 days 16 hours ago) and read 2552 times:

Try this one http://www.airliners.net/discussions/tech_ops/read.main/46271/4/

"Heavy" is spoken as part of the aircraft callsign only in the US.

Woodreau / KMVL



Bonus animus sit, ab experientia. Quod salvatum fuerit de malis usu venit judicium.
User currently offlineBroke From United States of America, joined Apr 2002, 1322 posts, RR: 3
Reply 2, posted (10 years 11 months 3 weeks 4 days 15 hours ago) and read 2531 times:

The term "Heavy" applies to any airplane with a GTOW of 300,000 lbs or higher and the 757. The 757 is included due to incidents with smaller aircraft making approaches behind a 757.

User currently offlineXFSUgimpLB41X From United States of America, joined Aug 2000, 4204 posts, RR: 37
Reply 3, posted (10 years 11 months 3 weeks 4 days 14 hours ago) and read 2519 times:

Actually its 255,000 pounds MGTOW.... 757-200 is not a heavy aircraft, but it does require larger separation than a standard "light" aircraft. The 757-300 is heavy.


Chicks dig winglets.
User currently offlineCancidas From Poland, joined Jul 2003, 4112 posts, RR: 11
Reply 4, posted (10 years 11 months 3 weeks 4 days 14 hours ago) and read 2517 times:

that is an ATC term so that they know how to space a/c. the only reason the 757-200 is considered heavy is that it creates the most problematic vortices.


"...cannot the kingdom of salvation take me home."
User currently offlineFlyguy1 From United States of America, joined Jun 1999, 1738 posts, RR: 4
Reply 5, posted (10 years 11 months 3 weeks 4 days 11 hours ago) and read 2477 times:

Why is heavy not a universal atc term than?


727, L1011, MD80, A300, 777-200, 737-300, 737-700, 747-400, 757-200, 737-800, A320. E190, E135, 767-200, CRJ9
User currently offlineSxmarbury33 From United States of America, joined Oct 2000, 445 posts, RR: 0
Reply 6, posted (10 years 11 months 3 weeks 4 days 11 hours ago) and read 2475 times:

The 757 does not carry the "heavy" callsign designation however for wake turb seperations ATC gives it the same legal seperation as a standard heavy. The 753 is heavy.

User currently offlineAirplanepics From United Kingdom, joined Jun 2003, 2736 posts, RR: 40
Reply 7, posted (10 years 11 months 3 weeks 4 days 11 hours ago) and read 2472 times:

"Heavy" is spoken as part of the aircraft callsign only in the US.


This is not true, when I was in ACE a few months ago, ATC used the callsign 'Heavy' for 757's upwards. The term heavy is used all over the world.

Airplanepics



Simon - London-Aviation.com
User currently offlinePositive rate From Australia, joined Sep 2001, 2143 posts, RR: 1
Reply 8, posted (10 years 11 months 3 weeks 4 days 10 hours ago) and read 2468 times:

The term heavy is used all over the world.

Nope it isn't. "Heavy" isn't used here in Australia for some reason and some European and possibly Asian countries either.


User currently offlineContact_tower From Norway, joined Sep 2001, 536 posts, RR: 1
Reply 9, posted (10 years 11 months 3 weeks 4 days 3 hours ago) and read 2415 times:

"Heavy" is used in most european countries as well. You only have to use it on first call/reply on new freq.

User currently offlineCfalk From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 10, posted (10 years 11 months 3 weeks 4 days 1 hour ago) and read 2374 times:

I was watching some ops in Geneva this weekend. I always assumed that there was a period of at least 2 minutes between a heavy and a lighter, single-aisle aircraft. But I saw Embraers and other small planes on the runway only 30 seconds to 1 minute after a 777, 747 and an A300-600 come through. What are the rules?

Charles


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