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Mooney Bravo: Pressurization Question  
User currently offline762er From United States of America, joined Feb 2001, 542 posts, RR: 1
Posted (11 years 1 month 2 weeks 2 days 16 hours ago) and read 6957 times:

I recently read the Mooney Bravo (Mooney's single engine turbo charged prop) has a max operating altitude of 25,000 feet. My question is, with an operating ceiling that high, is the Bravo pressurized or is supplemental oxygen required? If not pressurized is the O2 a standard feature on the Bravo? How does the system work. Are there any pressurized singles out there besides the Pilatus? Maybe the new Lancair which has similar operating specifications to the bravo. Thanks for any help.

7 replies: All unread, jump to last
 
User currently offlineT prop From United States of America, joined Apr 2001, 1029 posts, RR: 1
Reply 1, posted (11 years 1 month 2 weeks 2 days 16 hours ago) and read 6908 times:

Are there any pressurized singles out there besides the Pilatus? Maybe the new Lancair which has similar operating specifications to the bravo. Thanks for any help.

Don't know about the Lancair but a couple of other pressurized singles come to mind, the Piper Malibu series and Cessna's Turbo Centurion.

As far as the Mooney Bravo, I doubt if it's pressurized. Mooney's website makes no mention of it, if it was you can bet Mooney would advertise that. It does come with a 115cu. ft. O2 system.

http://www.mooney.com/Pages/bravodxfeatures.html

T prop.


User currently offlineCancidas From Poland, joined Jul 2003, 4112 posts, RR: 11
Reply 2, posted (11 years 1 month 2 weeks 2 days 16 hours ago) and read 6884 times:

supplemental oxygen is required for the pilots above 12000 ft, and recomended over 10000. also, if there is only one pilot on station on the flight deck then the other must be on oxgen until the other returns.


"...cannot the kingdom of salvation take me home."
User currently offlineDesertJets From United States of America, joined Feb 2000, 7811 posts, RR: 16
Reply 3, posted (11 years 1 month 2 weeks 2 days 15 hours ago) and read 6880 times:

The only piston singles that are pressurized are the Cessna P210, Piper Malibu and Mirage, and the Mooney M22 Mustang.

The primary problem with the P210 was that the fuselage was not designed to be a pressure vessel, thus being a sub-optimal platform to pressurize. Somehow I remember reading that the max pressure differential for the P210 was around 4.5, basically giving you a 10,000' cabin at FL210.

The Malibu/Mirage was a ground up design and thus optimized for pressurization. As far as I know it can maintain a 8,000' cabin up to FL250.

Don't know much about the Mustang, though I do believe it was the first one of the three to come out. Not many were built however.



Stop drop and roll will not save you in hell. --- seen on a church marque in rural Virginia
User currently offlineT prop From United States of America, joined Apr 2001, 1029 posts, RR: 1
Reply 4, posted (11 years 1 month 2 weeks 2 days 15 hours ago) and read 6865 times:

Here's another pressurized single.

http://www.extraaircraft.com/ea400.asp

Uses a liquid cooled Continental too.

T prop.


User currently offlineGoboeing From United States of America, joined Jun 2000, 2725 posts, RR: 15
Reply 5, posted (11 years 1 month 2 weeks 2 days 14 hours ago) and read 6850 times:

Cancidas,
It's 12,500 for part 91, after 30 minutes. You can go to 14,000 feet without oxygen for up to 30 minutes. Passengers have to have it available above 15,000 and must use it above FL180.

Nick


User currently offlinePilotpip From United States of America, joined Sep 2003, 3152 posts, RR: 10
Reply 6, posted (11 years 1 month 2 weeks 2 days 8 hours ago) and read 6795 times:

There are a couple pressurized singles in addition to the pilatus PC-12. These include the Socata TBM-700, and the Malibu Mirage. All of these aircraft are powered by turboprop engines, I think all use a derivitive of the PT-6.

Most of the high end singles that are not pressurized come with an oxygen system as standard or optional equipment today. If not, you can buy a portable system that will do the same job. In most cases though, it strikes me as being impractical to fly a piston single that high. Aside from mountainous terrain, you really don't bennefit much by taking the time to climb that high. If you're in a hurry, you might get a better tailwind but sitting up there for hours on end in any single, most of which don't have good cabin heat systems, is not my idea of a good time.



DMI
User currently offlineSSTjumbo From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 7, posted (11 years 1 month 6 days 17 hours ago) and read 6661 times:

also, if there is only one pilot on station on the flight deck then the other must be on oxgen until the other returns.


Which one does which? I'm confused  Confused


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