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Salary And Training As An A&P  
User currently offlineKaiGywer From United States of America, joined Oct 2003, 12203 posts, RR: 35
Posted (10 years 6 months 2 weeks 1 day 9 hours ago) and read 3334 times:
AIRLINERS.NET CREW
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Sorry if this has been discussed before, but..

I've had training as an A&P in Norway, but didn't do the two years apprenticeship required to obtain the license. Now, I live here in the US. I was wondering if I should try and finish training here. Now for the real questions, would my training in Norway do me any good as far as requirements here? And, how much does an A&P make, just so I know if I want to go there. Also, how does the job market for A&Ps look?

Thanks


911, where is your emergency?
18 replies: All unread, jump to last
 
User currently offlineEMBQA From United States of America, joined Oct 2003, 9364 posts, RR: 11
Reply 1, posted (10 years 6 months 2 weeks 1 day 8 hours ago) and read 3300 times:

Training in Europe and the US are different for A&P's, but your time should be able to be transfered to a US A&P school. The job market right now is not that great, but some companys are hiring. At the Repair Station I work at there are many contractors that are still on furlow for the majors....so I guess to be honest, its not that rosie.....just look at what your airline (Mesaba) did to their mechaincs last year......


"It's not the size of the dog in the fight, but the size of the fight in the dog"
User currently offlineKaiGywer From United States of America, joined Oct 2003, 12203 posts, RR: 35
Reply 2, posted (10 years 6 months 2 weeks 1 day 8 hours ago) and read 3296 times:
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FORUM MODERATOR

What did they do? I guess I haven't been with the company long enough to really know. Any idea what the pay is like though, if I was to find a job.


911, where is your emergency?
User currently offlineEMBQA From United States of America, joined Oct 2003, 9364 posts, RR: 11
Reply 3, posted (10 years 6 months 2 weeks 1 day 6 hours ago) and read 3271 times:

They shut down the brand new Heavy MX base at CVG and laid everybody off....They also took all the heavy maintenance to an outside company. The only Mx left are the guys that do the overnights and cover the line. Pay depends on experience, license and location. I've been in the business 10 years and do ok. I don't make enough to eat at the 'Ritz'....but I don't starve either.


"It's not the size of the dog in the fight, but the size of the fight in the dog"
User currently offlineBuzz From United States of America, joined Nov 1999, 697 posts, RR: 22
Reply 4, posted (10 years 6 months 2 weeks 15 hours ago) and read 3229 times:

Hi Kaigyver, Buzz here in snowy Vancouver Washington. If somebody can find a easier or more attractive way to make a living, then i'd suggest you do something else. But - for me i'm addicted to fixing things and enjoy airplanes.

The thing you learned on Norway -might- apply to some of the requirements for the FAA's required training. I'm not sure where you'd go to be tested to see how your previous training would apply - the A+P schools don't want to turn out a poor product - or maybe they need the money. If nothing else the topics you already know would make that part of school easy.

The Jobs out here have diminished, At UAL we no longer do any of our heavy overhauls, that's contracted out to other companies - supervised by ex-UAL vice presidents. The people there (rumor says) earn half the pay and have marginal other benefits - not where i'd like to be after 20+ years of experience. We still do many of our own C-checks.

Airlines have been recovering from the previous couple years of calamity. Some of the people are being called back to work, but not many. Pay and benefits have diminished, and you probably have to live in an expensive part of the country.

General Aviation covers all the other flying, i play with Classic airplanes for fun. Most people who own airplanes cannot afford to spend much on the care and feeding of their flying machine. There are some good jobs there, but hard to find one. One benefit is that you probably won't be in an expensive big city. Many companies take good care of their people in the Corporate aviation world.

Pardon me for complaining that you won't get rich in the Aircraft Mechanic business. After 20+ years you begin to wonder what you have to show for the sacrifices. Or maybe i've come to a plateau and i'm thinking what to do for the next 20+ years until i can't work anymore.

Fixing aircraft isn't a wise carreer move for many people. But it suits me, you have to love the job you do - i hear a lot of sniveling at work and i can't logically refute the complaints. But this kind of work suits me. I tell my flying buddies that UAL puts beans on the dinnertable, Classic Aircraft put a smile on my face.

g'day and Good Luck, and Good New Year
Buzz Fuselsausage: Line Mechanic by night, DC-3 crew Chief by choice, taildragger pilot for fun.


User currently offlineUAL Bagsmasher From United States of America, joined Sep 1999, 2146 posts, RR: 10
Reply 5, posted (10 years 6 months 2 weeks 14 hours ago) and read 3222 times:

Hey Buzz. I just got my Airframe last week. I'll have my Powerplant this summer. I know the mainline carriers are out of the question right now. What is the job situation at the regionals like Air Wisconsin or American Eagle? I know the pay stinks, but I'm looking at getting some experience. In the event that one of these years the majors start hiring, I'd like to have the minimum experience requirements. Any thoughts? Thanks!

User currently offlineJjbiv From United States of America, joined Jan 2001, 1226 posts, RR: 5
Reply 6, posted (10 years 6 months 2 weeks 13 hours ago) and read 3202 times:

If you want to come to Chicago, apply at Chicago Express -- especially if you're familiar with avionics. See http://www.ata.com/prod_svcs/ata_connex.html. There is also a MX base in SBN.

joe


User currently offlineEMBQA From United States of America, joined Oct 2003, 9364 posts, RR: 11
Reply 7, posted (10 years 6 months 2 weeks 8 hours ago) and read 3186 times:

Don't discount working for a regional airline. The pay is not that of a major, but there are some other benefits that the majors don't offer. For one, with a major, it maybe many YEARS before you have enough seniority to bid off night shifts.....with a regional, just a short year or so. With the regionalism you also get to work on many different aspects of the aircraft....engines, gear, interiors, electronics, and even get to do engine runs when you get your qualifications. In many cases at the majors, your stuck in one 'shop' and will only work one aspect of the aircraft. Also, with the majors you start in hub cities and are paying $1,000 a month for a small 1 br apartment and you commute one hour each way..(yuck) With the regional's, your normally in smaller cities and the cost of living is much lower.

As for where would I apply...? I have heard very good things about Air Wisconsin. I'd also take a serious look at Continental Express.



"It's not the size of the dog in the fight, but the size of the fight in the dog"
User currently offlineUAL Bagsmasher From United States of America, joined Sep 1999, 2146 posts, RR: 10
Reply 8, posted (10 years 6 months 2 weeks 7 hours ago) and read 3183 times:

I've already sent a resume' to Air Wisconsin. I too have heard great things about them. The more I think about it, the more I want to get away from the big beauacracy of the major carriers.

User currently offlineEmbqa From United States of America, joined Oct 2003, 9364 posts, RR: 11
Reply 9, posted (10 years 6 months 2 weeks 6 hours ago) and read 3173 times:

UAL-

Several years ago I was out in Texas overseeing several of our planes being painted and met some guys from Mountain Air Express. They had just been bought by 'Air Wisky' and where having their planes painted into UAL Express colors. We started talking one day and they where 'bitching' that the seniority lists where being merger 1-1, and the 'newest' guy at Air Wisconsin had something like 8 years service..!! I just said "Think about that...!!!!!" "That means the people don't leave, they like it where they are...." Now this was 6 or so years ago, and the industry has changed a lot in that time, but I still hear they are a good company to work for. Last I knew they had a Pention Plan AND 401K..!! Name any other company that does that.....!!! I worked for a Regional airline for 7 years and really liked my time there. I worked a year of overnights..went to days and worked the C-Check line, did Gate MX in BOS-LGA and JFK (all TDY) and ended up as a Technical Represenative and traved around when the planes went off site. That was a blast and I was paid to see the country and met some great people along the way.



"It's not the size of the dog in the fight, but the size of the fight in the dog"
User currently offlineUAL Bagsmasher From United States of America, joined Sep 1999, 2146 posts, RR: 10
Reply 10, posted (10 years 6 months 2 weeks 6 hours ago) and read 3168 times:

Sounds like you enjoy your work. I just hope they will hire someone fresh out of school. They can be very picky when so much talent is on furlough from the majors.

User currently offlineEmbqa From United States of America, joined Oct 2003, 9364 posts, RR: 11
Reply 11, posted (10 years 6 months 2 weeks 4 hours ago) and read 3157 times:

Actually, you stand a better chance of getting hired at a regional then a furlowed main line mechanic, as the regional knows that the main line mech's are subject to recall and will leave again as soon as recalled......so why waist the time hiring and training just to loose them. Like I said above, I enjoyed my time at a regional, and got to do things you'd never do with a major. I knew everybody in our company all the way up to the top, hung out with the flight crews based at our airport, actually worked a decent shift and saw the sun...I miss it at times, but I also enjoy the work I do now at a part 145 Repair Station.


"It's not the size of the dog in the fight, but the size of the fight in the dog"
User currently offlineBuzz From United States of America, joined Nov 1999, 697 posts, RR: 22
Reply 12, posted (10 years 6 months 1 week 6 days 1 hour ago) and read 3109 times:

Hi UALBagsmasher, Buzz here. I'll second the opinion of those last couple guys: a regional is OK if you like the region you're moving to. When a company takes good care of their people... go with them!
And the part about not having to move to a large city and pay a vast sum of your paycheck as rent is important too.
Find a job you like, in a place you like to live and be happy. The major airlines are not the only good place to work.
g'nite
Buzz Fuselsausage: Line Mechanic by night, DC-3 Crew Chief by choice, taildragger pilot for fun.


User currently offlineErj-145mech From United States of America, joined Oct 2001, 306 posts, RR: 1
Reply 13, posted (10 years 6 months 1 week 6 days ago) and read 3113 times:

Continental Express is starting to hire A&P's very soon. Check out www.expressjetair.com, and follow the link to jobs. Right now we have openings in BTV for line MX.

User currently offlineNKP S2 From United States of America, joined Dec 1999, 1714 posts, RR: 5
Reply 14, posted (10 years 6 months 1 week 5 days 14 hours ago) and read 3079 times:

"With the regionalism you also get to work on many different aspects of the aircraft....engines, gear, interiors, electronics, and even get to do engine runs when you get your qualifications. In many cases at the majors, your stuck in one 'shop' and will only work one aspect of the aircraft"

Nothing wrong with "paying your dues" on the way up working for a regional/commuter/FBO, but hiring on with a major, you're just as likely, if not more, to be put on the line and be preforming a variety of tasks as well. Even if hired to overhaul/heavy mtc, you're more likely to be on the hangar floor than a backshop.


User currently offlineKaiGywer From United States of America, joined Oct 2003, 12203 posts, RR: 35
Reply 15, posted (10 years 6 months 1 week 5 days 1 hour ago) and read 3021 times:
AIRLINERS.NET CREW
FORUM MODERATOR

Thanks for the replies guys. I was just thinking that it would be a LOT easier to just go to an A&P school and become a mechanic, than go through a full 4 year BS degree.


911, where is your emergency?
User currently offlineL-188 From United States of America, joined Jul 1999, 29786 posts, RR: 58
Reply 16, posted (10 years 6 months 1 week 5 days 1 hour ago) and read 3019 times:

I've had training as an A&P in Norway, but didn't do the two years apprenticeship required to obtain the license

That should be a JAA approved course right?

If you look at A&P school bring your documents, more may transfer over then you realize.

It is generally easier for JAA mechanics to move to the US then the for a US trained mechanic to get a JAA license. That is because the US does not have the apprenticeship requirement.

For example, the Canadians consider an A&P with an I/A the equivelent to their mechanics certificate.

Having the I/A is what they accept in leu of an apprenticeship.



OBAMA-WORST PRESIDENT EVER....Even SKOORB would be better.
User currently offlineKaiGywer From United States of America, joined Oct 2003, 12203 posts, RR: 35
Reply 17, posted (10 years 6 months 1 week 4 days 13 hours ago) and read 2990 times:
AIRLINERS.NET CREW
FORUM MODERATOR

Yeah, I have fulfilled the whole JAR-66 training, except for the apprenticeship part of it. All of my theoretical work is done and passed with flying colors.

Thinking ahead as I am (hey, at least sometimes..), I brought my whole syllabus from my school, describing in detail everything we covered.

Anybody know anything about Minneapolis Tech and Community College outisde Mpls, MN? I know they have an A&P program, but is it any good?



911, where is your emergency?
User currently offlineShenzhen From United States of America, joined Jun 2003, 1710 posts, RR: 2
Reply 18, posted (10 years 6 months 1 week 1 day 21 hours ago) and read 2940 times:

KaiGywer

I think you should be contacting the FAA, not an A/P school. The FAA can issue you the right to examine if they feel that the school you attended meets their requirements. Could be as simple as visiting their office, providing the details of the courses/certificates and answering a few airplane related questions.


Good luck.


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