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Airline Safety Expert  
User currently offlinePilotman52 From United States of America, joined Sep 2003, 54 posts, RR: 0
Posted (10 years 3 months 2 weeks 23 hours ago) and read 1744 times:

Hey all,

With all the recent news having to do with aviation lately, I can't help but hear "Airline Safety Expert" every time i listen to some news about accidents and incidents. My question is, what exactly is an "Airline Safety Expert". I assume it has to do with aviation and saftey just by the title. (I'm not THAT dumb!  Big grin ) What do you have to study in order to become an airline safety expert? Any information at all would be great. Thanks a lot!

Pilotman52

7 replies: All unread, jump to last
 
User currently offlineFredT From United Kingdom, joined Feb 2002, 2185 posts, RR: 26
Reply 1, posted (10 years 3 months 2 weeks 16 hours ago) and read 1640 times:

Degrees in aeronautical engineering and human factors in aviation should be a good start. Then an ATPL...

Now you've got something to do for a while. Big grin

Cheers,
Fred




I thought I was doing good trying to avoid those airport hotels... and look at me now.
User currently offlineAAR90 From United States of America, joined Jan 2000, 3451 posts, RR: 47
Reply 2, posted (10 years 3 months 2 weeks 12 hours ago) and read 1587 times:

If you are paying attention to "the news" you've noticed so-called "experts" commenting on any and all subject matters. To be a broadcast news "expert" means you are calling yourself an "expert." Nothing more, nothing less. Those of us who have worked or are working in the aviation safety field basically laugh at what the so-called "experts" on TV/radio have been saying.



*NO CARRIER* -- A Naval Aviator's worst nightmare!
User currently offlineFredT From United Kingdom, joined Feb 2002, 2185 posts, RR: 26
Reply 3, posted (10 years 3 months 2 weeks 11 hours ago) and read 1577 times:

Good point, AAR90. I was thinking of the airline and authority employed safety experts.

Rereading the original post, it is clear that they are not the ones asked about. They would never voluntarily appear in the news! With the average quality of aviation reporting today, that would probably be akin to career suicide. Big grin

Cheers,
Fred



I thought I was doing good trying to avoid those airport hotels... and look at me now.
User currently offlineSlamclick From United States of America, joined Nov 2003, 10062 posts, RR: 68
Reply 4, posted (10 years 3 months 2 weeks 10 hours ago) and read 1541 times:

Most true experts would never allow themselves to be called "expert" it is sort of like flame-baiting.

As has been pointed out, the TV (especially) "experts" are mostly guys with some goodies on their resume, but mostly they look pretty on camera. Got the gray hair at the temples, crow's feet at the corner of their eyes. Look like the actor central casting sent over to play the pilot in a walk-on. Good for them, but my problem is the dumb things they say, or the really bad edit their commentary gets before it is aired.

One well-known safety "expert" said that JFK Jr. had plenty of visibility to conduct the flight - six or seven miles. Well that may be fine over populated areas but where he crashed the nearest electric light was ten or twelve miles away. So what good does seven miles visibility do him? He was still in pitch dark. It was a very flawed observation and only served to keep alive the illusion that there was some mystery about Kennedy's crash.

But there is a career niche calling for safety specialists. Accident investigation is the usual route to these positions. Also USC has a professional level Aviation Safety program that is outstanding. It has been around for many years and many of the real experts are graduates.



Happiness is not seeing another trite Ste. Maarten photo all week long.
User currently offlineNormalSpeed From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 5, posted (10 years 3 months 2 weeks 10 hours ago) and read 1534 times:

Whatever it is, it sounds like a cool job.

-Normal


User currently offlineAAR90 From United States of America, joined Jan 2000, 3451 posts, RR: 47
Reply 6, posted (10 years 3 months 2 weeks 4 hours ago) and read 1469 times:

But there is a career niche calling for safety specialists. Accident investigation is the usual route to these positions.

Sadly, while the NTSB has some of the best investigators its "investigation" process is heavily politicized and legalized to the point that professional safety folks have been using its "crash investigation" techniques as training aides on how not to find the actual causes of aircraft mishaps.

Also USC has a professional level Aviation Safety program that is outstanding.

Yes, very outstanding. USAF sponsored the development of that program. Originally a one year graduate levels study course that has since [a long time ago] been compressed [USAF ordered] to 6 months. All USAF aviation safety officers must have completed that course. About 10 years after its creation the USN created [forced into it really] an ASO course at Naval Postgraduate School. USN "stole" the Dean [and founder] of USC's ASO program to develop the Navy's 6-week [now 5-week] program --another compression of the USAF/USC program. He was still the ASO Program Director and teaching the Aviation Law class when I attended NPGS in 1985. At that time ASO students received 9 graduate level credits for the 27 graduate level credits' worth of work [not enough classroom time for accreditation purposes]. A very intense 5 weeks indeed.




*NO CARRIER* -- A Naval Aviator's worst nightmare!
User currently offlineAir1727 From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 7, posted (10 years 3 months 2 weeks 4 hours ago) and read 1476 times:

Having used to work in the safety department with Trans World, I can tell you right now, none of us ever like being called an expert. Most of us had degrees in Av Management/Science with focuses on multi-crew flight operations human factors and investigation. There were also three engineers on staff for flight data analysis and data processing. I think most of the airline safety experts you see on television are "experts" in areas of security and emergency management; some of them also have backgrounds in anti-terrorism.

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