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Maximum Amount Of Force Before Gear Collapse  
User currently offlineRb211 From United States of America, joined Oct 2003, 632 posts, RR: 3
Posted (10 years 8 months 2 weeks 3 days ago) and read 2921 times:

I've flown on alot of 767's and almost always had what felt like a pretty hard landing. What is the maximum amount of force allowed on the main landing gear before it collapses or has anyone ever seen or heard of gear collapse due to rough landing?


Airline photography. Whether they're fully clothed, butt naked, having issues or confused I'm taking pictures!!
12 replies: All unread, jump to last
 
User currently offlineSlamclick From United States of America, joined Nov 2003, 10062 posts, RR: 68
Reply 1, posted (10 years 8 months 2 weeks 3 days ago) and read 2888 times:

Usually when a retractible landing gear fails it is due to a fracture of one small part- a latch or the like, that is found to be fatigued. Many landing gear struts go "over center" and the greater the force, the less likely they are to retract.

Extremely hard landings are actually more likely to damage the wing or body where the gear attaches than to collapse the gear.



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User currently offlineTrent900 From United Kingdom, joined Dec 2003, 530 posts, RR: 0
Reply 2, posted (10 years 8 months 2 weeks 2 days 23 hours ago) and read 2877 times:

I haven't heard of any incident's where the main gear has caused lots of damage, but I'm sure the nose wheel has in the past been pushed up into the fuselage due to heavy landings. I know I've read about about it but to the life of me can't remember where.

Trent.


User currently offline411A From United States of America, joined Nov 2001, 1826 posts, RR: 8
Reply 3, posted (10 years 8 months 2 weeks 2 days 23 hours ago) and read 2869 times:

Two incidents come to mid with regards to the strength of landing gear on transport aircraft.
1. L1011-500 operated by the RAF landed at BZZ with such a force (after the crew engaged autoland too late, in contrivention to the AFM) that the main gear struts protuded thru the upper wing surface. The aircraft went around and landed shortly thereafter, without the gear collapsing.
In the late seventies, A PanAmerican B707 was landed at JFK with a detatched left main gear side brace, and the gear remained extended..ie; did not collapse.

Landing gear on transport jets are indeed VERY tough.


User currently offlineRick767 From United Kingdom, joined Jan 2000, 2662 posts, RR: 51
Reply 4, posted (10 years 8 months 2 weeks 2 days 23 hours ago) and read 2885 times:

I wouldn't be concerned about your "hard" landings. I have absolutely smacked the 767 down before, and it still registered nowhere near the "hard landing" G limit in technical terms (i.e. the limit beyond which an inspection is required).

They're tough cookies those things...



I used to love the smell of Jet-A in the morning...
User currently offlineMr Spaceman From Canada, joined Mar 2001, 2787 posts, RR: 9
Reply 5, posted (10 years 8 months 2 weeks 2 days 19 hours ago) and read 2815 times:

Hi guys.

Well, I guess when it comes to hard landings (whatever the cause), sometimes parts are going to "Snap, Crackle, & Pop!!!" Big grin


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Chris  Smile




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User currently offlineBuckfifty From Canada, joined Oct 2001, 1316 posts, RR: 19
Reply 6, posted (10 years 8 months 2 weeks 1 day 8 hours ago) and read 2732 times:

Commercial jets normally land at around 4ft per second. An airliner, a rather new one which shall remain unidentified, landed at around 13 ft per second (measured), and broke the landing gear. This happened only a couple of months ago.  Big grin

User currently offlineZak From Greenland, joined Sep 2003, 1993 posts, RR: 8
Reply 7, posted (10 years 8 months 2 weeks 1 day 8 hours ago) and read 2730 times:

"An airliner, a rather new one which shall remain unidentified, landed at around 13 ft per second (measured), and broke the landing gear. This happened only a couple of months ago. "

correct me if i am wrong but wasnt that the center gear of a CX A340?
i have seen pictures of one without the main central gear assembly.



10=2
User currently offlineMr.BA From Singapore, joined Sep 2000, 3423 posts, RR: 21
Reply 8, posted (10 years 8 months 2 weeks 1 day 8 hours ago) and read 2732 times:

The Airbus A340-200/300 can operate safely without the center gear but with weight restrictions.


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Boeing747 万岁!
User currently offlineBuckfifty From Canada, joined Oct 2001, 1316 posts, RR: 19
Reply 9, posted (10 years 8 months 2 weeks 1 day 4 hours ago) and read 2707 times:

The a340 can fly with the centre gear inhibited, as the only function it carries is for increasing the MRW of the aircraft. With the gear in the stowed position, it has basically the same structural weight limitations as the A330.

In fact, in case of a gear extension failure with one of the main bogies, it is advised that the pilots do a gravity extension, as the centre gear remains in the wheel well in that instance. The gear cannot support any shock weight, and to have it down with one of the main gears up can cause more damage than it does to prevent it. Happened to a VS 340 a while back, this has.

correct me if i am wrong but wasnt that the center gear of a CX A340?
i have seen pictures of one without the main central gear assembly.


There are more specifics to that incident, but I really shouldn't be talking about that here. However, the aircraft is back in service, with no problems whatsoever.


User currently offlineMr.BA From Singapore, joined Sep 2000, 3423 posts, RR: 21
Reply 10, posted (10 years 8 months 2 weeks 17 hours ago) and read 2658 times:

Anyone knows what happened to the Qantas B747-338 back in Rome? I think it happened a few years ago but what exactly happened to the gear? Did it break or penetrated through the wings?

Thanks!



Boeing747 万岁!
User currently offlineBruce From United States of America, joined May 1999, 5056 posts, RR: 15
Reply 11, posted (10 years 8 months 2 weeks 11 hours ago) and read 2636 times:

Reminds me of one trip I took. I was flying Delta 767 from DTW - ATL in 2001. Well, we landed on runway 8 and very hard of course i had my seatbelt on but i was left with a major headache. We just SLAMMED down on the runway very hard and then we taxied to the Int'l concourse which was not our assigned gate and parked there, and the captain announced that those who were continuing on to Miami would NOT be using this aircraft check the gate agent to find your new plane.

After i deplaned, I hung around the windows and watched as a maint. crew seemed to be very concerned with the landing gear. I would not have been surprised if they broke something or at least screwed something up badly enough to take the plane out of service.

bruce



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User currently offlineAirplay From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 12, posted (10 years 8 months 2 weeks 4 hours ago) and read 2642 times:

The following landing gear standards were extracted from FAR 25 which represents the standards of airworthiness for transport category aircraft in the FAA's eyes. I hope this impresses that its quite impossible to gather simple answers regarding loading of airliner components and that much of the resulting specific aircraft data is held quite close to each manufacturers heart. There are several ways to establish compliance with airworthiness standards and some manufacturers have developed unique methods that may give them a commercial advantage. I hope this shows that it isn't a random design effort:

Sec. 25.473

Landing load conditions and assumptions.

(a) For the landing conditions specified in Sec. 25.479 to Sec. 25.485 the airplane is assumed to contact the ground--
(1) In the attitudes defined in Sec. 25.479 and Sec. 25.481;
(2) With a limit descent velocity of 10 fps at the design landing weight (the maximum weight for landing conditions at maximum descent velocity); and
(3) With a limit descent velocity of 6 fps at the design take-off weight (the maximum weight for landing conditions at a reduced descent velocity).
(4) The prescribed descent velocities may be modified if it is shown that the airplane has design features that make it impossible to develop these velocities.
(b) Airplane lift, not exceeding airplane weight, may be assumed unless the presence of systems or procedures significantly affects the lift.
(c) The method of analysis of airplane and landing gear loads must take into account at least the following elements:
(1) Landing gear dynamic characteristics.
(2) Spin-up and springback.
(3) Rigid body response.
(4) Structural dynamic response of the airframe, if significant.
[(d) The landing gear dynamic characteristics must be validated by tests as defined in Sec. 25.723(a).]
(e) The coefficient of friction between the tires and the ground may be established by considering the effects of skidding velocity and tire pressure. However, this coefficient of friction need not be more than 0.8.

Sec. 25.477

Landing gear arrangement.

Sections 25.479 through 25.485 apply to airplanes with conventional arrangements of main and nose gears, or main and tail gears, when normal operating techniques are used.

Sec. 25.479

Level landing conditions.

[(a) In the level attitude, the airplane is assumed to contact the ground at forward velocity components, ranging from to 1.25 parallel to the ground under the conditions prescribed in Sec. 25.473 with--
(1) equal to (TAS) at the appropriate landing weight and in standard sea level conditions; and
(2) equal to (TAS) at the appropriate landing weight and altitudes in a hot day temperature of 41 degrees F. above standard.
(3) The effects of increased contact speed must be investigated if approval of downwind landings exceeding 10 knots is requested.
(b) For the level landing attitude for airplanes with tail wheels, the conditions specified in this section must be investigated with the airplane horizontal reference line horizontal in accordance with Figure 2 of Appendix A of this part.
(c) For the level landing attitude for airplanes with nose wheels, shown in Figure 2 of Appendix A of this part, the conditions specified in this section must be investigated assuming the following attitudes:
(1) An attitude in which the main wheels are assumed to contact the ground with the nose wheel just clear of the ground; and
(2) If reasonably attainable at the specified descent and forward velocities, an attitude in which the nose and main wheels are assumed to contact the ground simultaneously.
(d) In addition to the loading conditions prescribed in paragraph (a) of this section, but with maximum vertical ground reactions calculated from paragraph (a), the following apply:
(1) The landing gear and directly affected attaching structure must be designed for the maximum vertical ground reaction combined with an aft acting drag component of not less than 25% of this maximum vertical ground reaction.
(2) The most severe combination of loads that are likely to arise during a lateral drift landing must be taken into account. In absence of a more rational analysis of this condition, the following must be investigated:
(i) A vertical load equal to 75% of the maximum ground reaction of Sec. 25.473 must be considered in combination with a drag and side load of 40% and 25% respectively of that vertical load.
(ii) The shock absorber and tire deflections must be assumed to be 75% of the deflection corresponding to the maximum ground reaction of Sec. 25.473(a)(2). This load case need not be considered in combination with flat tires.
(3) The combination of vertical and drag components is considered to be acting at the wheel axle centerline.]


Sec. 25.481

Tail down landing conditions.

(a) In the tail-down attitude, the airplane is assumed to contact the ground at forward velocity components, ranging from to parallel to the ground under the conditions prescribed in Sec. 25.473 with--
(1) equal to (TAS) at the appropriate landing weight and in standard sea level conditions; and
(2) equal to (TAS) at the appropriate landing weight and altitudes in a hot day temperature of 41 degrees F. above standard.
[(3) The combination of vertical and drag components considered to be acting at the main wheel axle centerline.]
(b) For the tail-down landing condition for airplanes with tail wheels, the main and tail wheels are assumed to contact the ground simultaneously, in accordance with figure 3 of Appendix A. Ground reaction conditions on the tail wheel are assumed to act--
(1) Vertically; and
(2) Up and aft through the axle at 45 degrees to the ground line.
(c) For the tail-down landing condition for airplanes with nose wheels, the airplane is assumed to be at an attitude corresponding to either the stalling angle or the maximum angle allowing clearance with the ground by each part of the airplane other than the main wheels, in accordance with figure 3 of Appendix A, whichever is less.

Sec. 25.483

[One-gear landing conditions.]

[For the one-gear landing conditions, the airplane is assumed to be in the level attitude and to contact the ground on one main landing gear, in accordance with Figure 4 of Appendix A of this part. In this attitude--
(a) The ground reactions must be the same as those obtained on that side under Sec. 25.479(d)(1), and]
(b) Each unbalanced external load must be reacted by airplane inertia in a rational or conservative manner.


Sec. 25.485

Side load conditions.

[In addition to Sec. 25.479(d)(2) the following conditions must be considered:]
(a) For the side load condition, the airplane is assumed to be in the level attitude with only the main wheels contacting the ground, in accordance with figure 5 of Appendix A.
(b) Side loads of 0.8 of the vertical reaction (on one side) acting inward and 0.6 of the vertical reaction (on the other side) acting outward must be combined with one-half of the maximum vertical ground reactions obtained in the level landing conditions. These loads are assumed to be applied at the ground contact point and to be resisted by the inertia of the airplane. The drag loads may be assumed to be zero.


Sec. 25.487

Rebound landing condition.

(a) The landing gear and its supporting structure must be investigated for the loads occurring during rebound of the airplane from the landing surface.
(b) With the landing gear fully extended and not in contact with the ground, a load factor of 20.0 must act on the unsprung weights of the landing gear. This load factor must act in the direction of motion of the unsprung weights as they reach their limiting positions in extending with relation to the sprung parts of the landing gear.


Sec. 25.489

Ground handling conditions.

[Unless otherwise prescribed, the landing gear and airplane structure must be investigated for the conditions in Secs. 25.491 through 25.509 with the airplane at the design ramp weight (the maximum weight for ground handling conditions).] No wing lift may be considered. The shock absorbers and tires may be assumed to be in their static position.

Sec. 25.491

[Taxi, takeoff and landing roll.]

[Within the range of appropriate ground speeds and approved weights, the airplane structure and landing gear are assumed to be subjected to loads not less than those obtained when the aircraft is operating over the roughest ground that may reasonably be expected in normal operation.]

Sec. 25.493

Braked roll conditions.

(a) An airplane with a tail wheel is assumed to be in the level attitude with the load on the main wheels, in accordance with figure 6 of Appendix A. The limit vertical load factor is 1.2 at the design landing weight, and 1.0 at the design ramp weight. A drag reaction equal to the vertical reaction multiplied by a coefficient of friction of 0.8, must be combined with the vertical ground reaction and applied at the ground contact point.
(b) For an airplane with a nose wheel, the limit vertical load factor is 1.2 at the design landing weight, and 1.0 at the design ramp weight. A drag reaction equal to the vertical reaction, multiplied by a coefficient of friction of 0.8, must be combined with the vertical reaction and applied at the ground contact point of each wheel with brakes. The following two attitudes, in accordance with figure 6 of Appendix A, must be considered:
(1) The level attitude with the wheels contacting the ground and the loads distributed between the main and nose gear. Zero pitching acceleration is assumed.
(2) The level attitude with only the main gear contacting the ground and with the pitching moment resisted by angular acceleration.
[(c) A drag reaction lower than that prescribed in this section may be used if it is substantiated that an effective drag force of 0.8 times the vertical reaction cannot be attained under any likely loading condition.
(d) An airplane equipped with a nose gear must be designed to withstand the loads arising from the dynamic pitching motion of the airplane due to sudden application of maximum braking force. The airplane is considered to be at design takeoff weight with the nose and main gears in contact with the ground, and with a steady-state vertical load factor of 1.0. The steady-state nose gear reaction must be combined with the maximum incremental nose gear vertical reaction caused by the sudden application of maximum braking force as described in paragraphs (b) and (c) of this section.
(e) In the absence of a more rational analysis, the nose gear vertical reaction prescribed in paragraph (d) of this section must be calculated according to the following formula:


Where:
VN = Nose gear vertical reaction.
WT = Design takeoff weight.
A = Horizontal distance between the c.g. of the airplane and the nose wheel.
B = Horizontal distance between the c.g. of the airplane and the line joining the centers of the main wheels.
E = Vertical height of the c.g. of the airplane above the ground in the 1.0 g static condition.
m = Coefficient of friction of 0.80.
f = Dynamic response factor; 2.0 is to be used unless a lower factor is substantiated. In the absence of other information, the dynamic response factor f may be defined by the equation:


Where:
x is the effective critical damping ratio of the rigid body pitching mode about the main landing gear effective ground contact point.

Sec. 25.495

Turning.

In the static position, in accordance with figure 7 of Appendix A, the airplane is assumed to execute a steady turn by nose gear steering, or by application of sufficient differential power, so that the limit load factors applied at the center of gravity are 1.0 vertically and 0.5 laterally. The side ground reaction of each wheel must be 0.5 of the vertical reaction.


Sec. 25.497

Tail-wheel yawing.

(a) A vertical ground reaction equal to the static load on the tail wheel, in combination with a side component of equal magnitude, is assumed.
(b) If there is a swivel, the tail wheel is assumed to be swiveled 90° to the airplane longitudinal axis with the resultant load passing through the axle.
(c) If there is a lock, steering device, or shimmy damper the tail wheel is also assumed to be in the trailing position with the side load acting at the ground contact point.

Sec. 25.499

[Nose-wheel yaw and steering.]

(a) A vertical load factor of 1.0 at the airplane center of gravity, and a side component at the nose wheel ground contact equal to 0.8 of the vertical ground reaction at that point are assumed.
(b) With the airplane assumed to be in static equilibrium with the loads resulting from the use of brakes on one side of the main landing gear, the nose gear, its attaching structure, and the fuselage structure forward of the center of gravity must be designed for the following loads:
(1) A vertical load factor at the center of gravity of 1.0.
(2) A forward acting load at the airplane center of gravity of 0.8 times the vertical load on one main gear.
(3) Side and vertical loads at the ground contact point on the nose gear that are required for static equilibrium.
(4) A side load factor at the airplane center of gravity of zero.
(c) If the loads prescribed in paragraph (b) of this section result in a nose gear side load higher than 0.8 times the vertical nose gear load, the design nose gear side load may be limited to 0.8 times the vertical load, with unbalanced yawing moments assumed to be resisted by airplane inertia forces.
(d) For other than the nose gear, its attaching structure, and the forward fuselage structure, the loading conditions are those prescribed in paragraph (b) of this section, except that--
(1) A lower drag reaction may be used if an effective drag force of 0.8 times the vertical reaction cannot be reached under any likely loading condition; and
(2) The forward acting load at the center of gravity need not exceed the maximum drag reaction on one main gear, determined in accordance with Sec. 25.493(b).
[(e) With the airplane at design ramp weight, and the nose gear in any steerable position, the combined application of full normal steering torque and vertical force equal to 1.33 times the maximum static reaction on the nose gear must be considered in designing the nose gear, its attaching structure, and the forward fuselage structure.]

Sec. 25.503

Pivoting.

(a) The airplane is assumed to pivot about one side of the main gear with the brakes on that side locked. The limit vertical load factor must be 1.0 and the coefficient of friction 0.8.
(b) The airplane is assumed to be in static equilibrium, with the loads being applied at the ground contact points, in accordance with figure 8 of Appendix A.

Sec. 25.507

Reversed braking.

(a) The airplane must be in a three point static ground attitude. Horizontal reactions parallel to the ground and directed forward must be applied at the ground contact point of each wheel with brakes. The limit loads must be equal to 0.55 times the vertical load at each wheel or to the load developed by 1.2 times the nominal maximum static brake torque, whichever is less.
(b) For airplanes with nose wheels, the pitching moment must be balanced by rotational inertia.
(c) For airplanes with tail wheels, the resultant of the ground reactions must pass through the center of gravity of the airplane.

Sec. 25.509

Towing loads.

(a) The towing loads specified in paragraph (d) of this section must be considered separately. These loads must be applied at the towing fittings and must act parallel to the ground. In addition--
(1) A vertical load factor equal to 1.0 must be considered acting at the center of gravity;
(2) The shock struts and tires must be in their static positions; and
(3) With as the [design ramp weight], the towing load, , is--
(i) 0.3 for less than 30,000 pounds;
(ii) for between 30,000 and 100,000 pounds; and
(iii) 0.15 for over 100,000 pounds.
(b) For towing points not on the landing gear but near the plane of symmetry of the airplane, the drag and side tow load components specified for the auxiliary gear apply. For towing points located outboard of the main gear, the drag and side tow load components specified for the main gear apply. Where the specified angle of swivel cannot be reached, the maximum obtainable angle must be used.
(c) The towing loads specified in paragraph (d) of this section must be reacted as follows:
(1) The side component of the towing load at the main gear must be reacted by a side force at the static ground line of the wheel to which the load is applied.
(2) The towing loads at the auxiliary gear and the drag components of the towing loads at the main gear must be reacted as follows:
(i) A reaction with a maximum value equal to the vertical reaction must be applied at the axle of the wheel to which the load is applied. Enough airplane inertia to achieve equilibrium must be applied.
(ii) The loads must be reacted by airplane inertia.
(d) The prescribed towing loads are as follows:

Tow point Position Load
Magnitude No. Direction
Main gear. 0.75 per main gear unit. 1
2
3
4 Forward, parallel to drag axis.
Forward, at 30° to drag axis.
Aft, parallel to drag axis.
Aft, at 30° to drag axis.
Swiveled forward. 5
6 Forward.
Aft.
Swiveled aft. 1.0 7
8 Forward.
Aft.
Auxiliary gear. Swiveled 45° from forward. 0.5 9
10 Forward, in plane of wheel.
Aft, in plane of wheel.
Swiveled 45° from aft. 11
12 Forward, in plane of wheel.
Aft, in plane of wheel.

Sec. 25.511

Ground load: unsymmetrical loads on multiple-wheel units.

(a) General. Multiple-wheel landing gear units are assumed to be subjected to the limit ground loads prescribed in this subpart under paragraphs (b) through (f) of this section. In addition--
(1) A tandem strut gear arrangement is a multiple-wheel unit; and
(2) In determining the total load on a gear unit with respect to the provisions of paragraphs (b) through (f) of this section, the transverse shift in the load centroid, due to unsymmetrical load distribution on the wheels, may be neglected.
(b) Distribution of limit loads to wheels; tires inflated. The distribution of the limit loads among the wheels of the landing gear must be established for each landing, taxiing, and ground handling condition, taking into account the effects of the following factors:
(1) The number of wheels and their physical arrangements. For truck type landing gear units, the effects of any seesaw motion of the truck during the landing impact must be considered in determining the maximum design loads for the fore and aft wheel pairs.
(2) Any differentials in tire diameters resulting from a combination of manufacturing tolerances, tire growth, and tire wear. A maximum tire-diameter differential equal to of the most unfavorable combination of diameter variations that is obtained when taking into account manufacturing tolerances, tire growth, and tire wear, may be assumed.
(3) Any unequal tire inflation pressure, assuming the maximum variation to be ±5 percent of the nominal tire inflation pressure.
(4) A runway crown of zero and a runway crown having a convex upward shape that may be approximated by a slope of 1½ percent with the horizontal. Runway crown effects must be considered with the nose gear unit on either slope of the crown.
(5) The airplane attitude.
(6) Any structural deflections.
(c) Deflated tires. The effect of deflated tires on the structure must be considered with respect to the loading conditions specified in paragraphs (d) through (f) of this section, taking into account the physical arrangement of the gear components. In addition--
(1) The deflation of any one tire for each multiple wheel landing gear unit, and the deflation of any two critical tires for each landing gear unit using four or more wheels per unit, must be considered; and
(2) The ground reactions must be applied to the wheels with inflated tires except that, for multiple-wheel gear units with more than one shock strut, a rational distribution of the ground reactions between the deflated and inflated tires, accounting for the differences in shock strut extensions resulting from a deflated tire, may be used.
(d) Landing conditions. For one and for two deflated tires, the applied load to each gear unit is assumed to be 60 percent and 50 percent, respectively, of the limit load applied to each gear for each of the prescribed landing conditions. However, for the drift landing condition of Sec. 25.485, 100 percent of the vertical load must be applied.
(e) Taxiing and ground handling conditions. For one and for two deflated tires--
(1) The applied side or drag load factor, or both factors, at the center of gravity must be the most critical value up to 50 percent and 40 percent, respectively, of the limit side or drag load factors, or both factors, corresponding to the most severe condition resulting from consideration of the prescribed taxiing and ground handling conditions;
(2) For the braked roll conditions of Sec. 25.493 (a) and (b)(2), the drag loads on each inflated tire may not be less than those at each tire for the symmetrical load distribution with no deflated tires;
(3) The vertical load factor at the center of gravity must be 60 percent and 50 percent, respectively, of the factor with no deflated tires, except that it may not be less than 1g; and
(4) Pivoting need not be considered.
(f) Towing conditions. For one and for two deflated tires, the towing load, FTOW, must be 60 percent and 50 percent, respectively, of the load prescribed.





Sec. 25.723

Shock absorption tests.


[(a) The analytical representation of the landing gear dynamic characteristics that is used in determining the landing loads must be validated by energy absorption tests. A range of tests must be conducted to ensure that the analytical representation is valid for the design conditions specified in Sec. 25.473.
(1) The configurations subjected to energy absorption tests at limit design conditions must include at least the design landing weight or the design takeoff weight, whichever produces the greater value of landing impact energy.
(2) The test attitude of the landing gear unit and the application of appropriate drag loads during the test must simulate the airplane landing conditions in a manner consistent with the development of rational or conservative limit loads.
(b) The landing gear may not fail in a test, demonstrating its reserve energy absorption capacity, simulating a descent velocity of 12 f.p.s. at design landing weight, assuming airplane lift not greater than airplane weight acting during the landing impact.
(c) In lieu of the tests prescribed in this section, changes in previously approved design weights and minor changes in design may be substantiated by analyses based on previous tests conducted on the same
basic landing gear system that has similar energy absorption characteristics.]


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