Sponsor Message:
Aviation Technical / Operations Forum
My Starred Topics | Profile | New Topic | Forum Index | Help | Search 
Any Technical Explanation For This A319 Take-off?  
User currently offlineTAP1972 From Portugal, joined Dec 2003, 396 posts, RR: 3
Posted (10 years 6 months 2 weeks 4 days 20 hours ago) and read 8550 times:


Question for the Experts:

Any technical explanation for this weird take-off? It happened in Funchal.


View Large View Medium
Click here for bigger photo!

Photo © Tomás Coelho



23 replies: All unread, jump to last
 
User currently offlineNwfltattendant From United States of America, joined Nov 2003, 341 posts, RR: 4
Reply 1, posted (10 years 6 months 2 weeks 4 days 19 hours ago) and read 8242 times:

????

Saw somebody goodlooking across the ramp and wanted another look ?

Empty flight and crew's goofing off ?...


I really cant think of any reason for this !



Go yakkin !!!!!!
User currently offlineKatekebo From United States of America, joined Apr 2001, 702 posts, RR: 6
Reply 2, posted (10 years 6 months 2 weeks 4 days 18 hours ago) and read 7993 times:

Based on my very limited technical knowledge, one possible explanation is that they rotated / took off with lower airspeed than prescribed for the particular conditions (takeoff weight, temperature) of that day. As soon as they realized the issues, the pilots (or the FBW computer) put the airplane at a minimum AOA to avoid stall and gain airspeed.

User currently offlineGigneil From United States of America, joined Nov 2002, 16347 posts, RR: 85
Reply 3, posted (10 years 6 months 2 weeks 4 days 18 hours ago) and read 7882 times:

They may well have been flying past the tower to check on a problem.

N


User currently offlineN737MC From Canada, joined Oct 2000, 678 posts, RR: 17
Reply 4, posted (10 years 6 months 2 weeks 4 days 18 hours ago) and read 7731 times:

Ummm..ok..


Yeah, so you might want to read the comments that the Photographer left for the photo. It explains what the aircraft did. No questions you should have after that.


Aaron


User currently offlineIsitsafenow From United States of America, joined Feb 2004, 4984 posts, RR: 23
Reply 5, posted (10 years 6 months 2 weeks 4 days 17 hours ago) and read 7585 times:

A pilot will tell you, wont ya guys?
I saw one of these take-offs at LAN in August of 1968. A UA 727-100 took off on 28L, got up about 75 feet, tucked up the gear and flew the runway length(7000ft) and then started to climb. In the old days you could stand outside and watch the planes at the gate (what jetways?). A United agent I was standing next to said to me in conversation.."He said he was going to do something special on t/o". He was referring to the pilots comments while in LAN ops talking to the agents before departing to ORD. The flight was suppose to be a Viscount but there was an equiptment change at ORD on the inbound. Pilots do these kind of t/o's when they know they can get away with it. It looks great if your on the ground.



If two people agree on EVERYTHING, then one isn't necessary.
User currently offlineLiamksa From Australia, joined Oct 2001, 308 posts, RR: 0
Reply 6, posted (10 years 6 months 2 weeks 4 days 13 hours ago) and read 7235 times:

http://movies.lazyeights.net/a319_start.mpeg

Or a good old-fashioned beat-up  Nuts


User currently offlineN243NW From United States of America, joined Jul 2003, 1629 posts, RR: 20
Reply 7, posted (10 years 6 months 2 weeks 4 days 13 hours ago) and read 7198 times:

Liamska-
Awesome video, man! This can be described like the old Kai Tak takeoffs and landings: "Ex-fighter pilot?"
-N243NW  Big thumbs up



B-52s don't take off. They scare the ground away.
User currently offlineCorey07850 From United States of America, joined Feb 2004, 2527 posts, RR: 5
Reply 8, posted (10 years 6 months 2 weeks 4 days 13 hours ago) and read 7192 times:

While probably not what's happening in this picture, this type of takeoff is more common in GA aircraft to simulate a t/o on a soft-field (anything other than a smooth paved surface). To minimize the time the aircraft is traveling on the undesirable surface, the plane will rotate at a slower Vr, then level off close to the ground in order to remain in ground effect. The ground effect keeps the plane flying at a slower airspeed until it accelerates enough to climb out.

I guess there's a chance that this is what the a319 pilot is doing, but who knows.  Smile


User currently offlineDC-10Tech From United States of America, joined Jun 2001, 298 posts, RR: 2
Reply 9, posted (10 years 6 months 2 weeks 4 days 12 hours ago) and read 7141 times:

I have been on ferry flights where we have done this because someone on the ground has coordinated to get a good photo during takeoff. We would get our DC-10 about 50 feet or so above the runway, raise the gear, and fly runway heading to give the guy at the other end of the field a nice photo.

Just one possiblity.


I just looked at that Airbus takeoff. It looks like he pulled up too hard, you can see the computer correcting and pushing the nose slight forward.

Good gawd that pilot has balls.



Forums.AMTCentral.com
User currently offlineLuisinho From Portugal, joined Nov 2000, 229 posts, RR: 1
Reply 10, posted (10 years 6 months 2 weeks 4 days 12 hours ago) and read 7149 times:

hii TAP 1972!!!  Big thumbs up

I know exactly what that pilot was doing!
That is a special monouver that was used in Africa, in Angola and Moçambique in that small runways. You take off with normal flap settings, and rotate a little bit earlier, and when it is almost leaving the ground you set +1 flap level and it gives an extra lift and the aircraft climbs but with nose down... strange but its true... imagine a plane being elevated by the zone of wings, and then, aceleration with vertical speed = 0. and then... climb normaly.

That captain should have more then 40 years, and should be an Ex-Air Force, and should have served in the Ultramar War.

Thanks for Sharing this TAP1972..  Big thumbs up

We have the best pilots in the world... and the best airline.... !!!!

LONG LIVE PORTUGAL....!!! Except your politics! eeheheheh

LUIS

[Edited 2004-02-06 03:24:04]

User currently offlinePPGMD From United States of America, joined Sep 2001, 2453 posts, RR: 0
Reply 11, posted (10 years 6 months 2 weeks 3 days 18 hours ago) and read 6688 times:

Wow people actually visit my website.  Smile


At worst, you screw up and die.
User currently onlineXFSUgimpLB41X From United States of America, joined Aug 2000, 4193 posts, RR: 37
Reply 12, posted (10 years 6 months 2 weeks 3 days 14 hours ago) and read 6553 times:

It's called showing off.. nothing more. haha. That manuever is called a transition takeoff. It's just alot of fun and was likely a deadhead with an empty airplane.


Chicks dig winglets.
User currently offlineAAR90 From United States of America, joined Jan 2000, 3471 posts, RR: 47
Reply 13, posted (10 years 6 months 2 weeks 3 days 14 hours ago) and read 6553 times:

Commonly called a "low transition." Nothing more than very slow/no climb rate, accellerate rapidly and raise the gear as soon as you're airborne. Near end of runway one normally transitions to rapid (near max performance) climb. Looks "cool" for spectators and is fun for pilots. Normally prohibited for revenue flights. In 17 years at AA I have only done this once. Nowdays local airport noise procedures virtually eliminate most opportunities.  Crying



*NO CARRIER* -- A Naval Aviator's worst nightmare!
User currently offlineAir2gxs From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 14, posted (10 years 6 months 2 weeks 3 days 14 hours ago) and read 6542 times:

I remember taking off out of Dover AFB in the early 90's in an empty B747. Just ballast fuel in the belly. We were going to JFK. The captain was tired of watching the C5 pilots doing T&G's and showing off on there take-offs. It seemed that we were off the ground in less than 2000 ft. Climbed out at 30 degs. That take-off literally plastered me to the seat. We wound up busting 250kts prior to 10000 ft. Capt. was suitably chastised.

User currently offlineMeister808 From United States of America, joined Jan 2000, 973 posts, RR: 1
Reply 15, posted (10 years 6 months 2 weeks 2 days 17 hours ago) and read 6329 times:

Nowdays local airport noise procedures virtually eliminate most opportunities

Why is that?? I would think that a takeoff like this would actually be better for noise abatement, since the airplane accelerates over the airport and can then climb out at a high rate of climb, thus getting the airplane higher faster.

-Meister



Twin Cessna 812 Victor, Minneapolis Center, we observe your operation in the immediate vicinity of extreme precipitation
User currently offlineSupraZachAir From Northern Mariana Islands, joined Feb 2004, 634 posts, RR: 0
Reply 16, posted (10 years 6 months 1 week 1 day 9 hours ago) and read 5657 times:

Man and I thought soft field t/o's in a Piper Warrior were a kick in the pants! Thats amazing. Very cool vid.

User currently offlineMD-90 From United States of America, joined Jan 2000, 8506 posts, RR: 12
Reply 17, posted (10 years 6 months 1 week 1 day 7 hours ago) and read 5635 times:

Meister808, altitude is the best noise reducer.

User currently offlineL-188 From United States of America, joined Jul 1999, 29792 posts, RR: 58
Reply 18, posted (10 years 6 months 1 week 18 hours ago) and read 5468 times:

They must have pulled the circut breaker for the computer.

Still soft field takeoffs are behaviors exhibited by pipers not Airbuses.



OBAMA-WORST PRESIDENT EVER....Even SKOORB would be better.
User currently offlineSupraZachAir From Northern Mariana Islands, joined Feb 2004, 634 posts, RR: 0
Reply 19, posted (10 years 6 months 1 week 13 hours ago) and read 5396 times:

I didn't mean that that was necessarily a soft field takeoff, just comparing that to a soft field t/o in a Piper. Thats all.

User currently offlineAAR90 From United States of America, joined Jan 2000, 3471 posts, RR: 47
Reply 20, posted (10 years 6 months 1 week 7 hours ago) and read 5283 times:

Why is that?? I would think that a takeoff like this would actually be better for noise abatement, since the airplane accelerates over the airport and can then climb out at a high rate of climb, thus getting the airplane higher faster.

Rate of climb is much different than Angle of climb. Most of today's airport noise procedures are written to maximize angle of climb and thereby reducing noise footprint on the ground.



*NO CARRIER* -- A Naval Aviator's worst nightmare!
User currently offline2000first From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 21, posted (10 years 6 months 6 days 19 hours ago) and read 5129 times:

In 1998 I flew on the Jersey European flight from Belfast City to Londonderry ( a short flight of only about 20- 25 mins. My friend and I were the only 2 passengers on the SHC360, and the pilot performed one of these take offs. It was very shocking, but extreemly enjoyable, as ill prob never get the opportunity to do it again.

as soon as we lifted off, I thought that something had gone wrong, as we didnt seem to be gaining any altitude. all of a sudden, about 5 or 6 seconds later, he pulled up the nose sharply and we soared into the air!!! Something that i didnt think a SHC360 was capable of!lol!  Smile

The stewardess (who turned out to be the wife of the captain!!) told us that they do this all the time when there are no passengers oin board or only a few "young lads" such as ourselves. We were then aloud to stand outside the cockpit doors (there are 2 on the SHC360....one to the right of the captains seat, and one to the left of the co-pilots seat) until final appraoch into Derry airport. He kept the cockpit doors open for the landing aswell, so that we could pretty much see most of the approach, unitl the last few seconds when the nose was raised, then all we could see was sky, as the cockpit on the 360 is a step up from cabin level.

Just thought i would share this interesting experience (for me anyway!!lol!) with u guys!!

PS when i was doin work experience at BFS in 1999 as part of my sixth for study, an Aer Lingus flight attendant told me that they also do this when they are on an empty, or ferry flight, and the cabin crew sit on trays and slide down the ailses when the aircraft pulls up sharply!lol!!

regards,
james  Smile


User currently offlineCanadianPilot From Canada, joined Mar 2003, 74 posts, RR: 0
Reply 22, posted (10 years 6 months 6 days 16 hours ago) and read 5038 times:

Rich Kid doing a Commercial Flight Test?
Examiner made him start with a SoftField T/O.

 Smile/happy/getting dizzy





User currently offlineBarney Captain From United States of America, joined Nov 2001, 935 posts, RR: 13
Reply 23, posted (10 years 6 months 5 days 20 hours ago) and read 4790 times:

We use to do this all the time at Skywest when we didn't have any one on board. The ramp agents in SAN would call it a "Gee-whiz" take-off. Even an old metroliner looks cool when it goes fast at low level. After one such gee-whiz, a somewhat annoyed SAN tower controller said; "would an obviously empty Skywest 435 please contact departure control". we laughed all the way to L.A.


...from the Banana Republic....
Top Of Page
Forum Index

Reply To This Topic Any Technical Explanation For This A319 Take-off?
Username:
No username? Sign up now!
Password: 


Forgot Password? Be reminded.
Remember me on this computer (uses cookies)
  • Tech/Ops related posts only!
  • Not Tech/Ops related? Use the other forums
  • No adverts of any kind. This includes web pages.
  • No hostile language or criticizing of others.
  • Do not post copyright protected material.
  • Use relevant and describing topics.
  • Check if your post already been discussed.
  • Check your spelling!
  • DETAILED RULES
Add Images Add SmiliesPosting Help

Please check your spelling (press "Check Spelling" above)


Similar topics:More similar topics...
Explanation For This Video? posted Fri Apr 2 2004 05:32:39 by Fly2hmo
Climb Rate/take-off Performance For Widebodies posted Sat Sep 3 2005 01:01:31 by WunalaYann
Min Runway Take Off Lengths For A330,A340,777,787 posted Sat Sep 3 2005 00:01:05 by EI321
What Is The Maxima Take Off Length For 747sp posted Sun Aug 24 2003 06:03:43 by 747400sp
Take-off Speeds For TU-134 And TU-154? posted Mon Nov 11 2002 03:11:32 by Wardialer
Minimum Take Off Distance For The 757 posted Wed May 16 2001 07:32:43 by ILUV767
Take-off Patterns For LAX posted Wed Mar 14 2001 10:49:19 by QANTAS747-438
Engine Spool-up For Take-off Roll posted Mon Aug 14 2000 21:08:21 by Beechbarron
Boeing 737 Minimum Take-off/Landing Requirements posted Fri Nov 3 2006 16:22:57 by NZ8800
Reason For This Crash posted Sun Oct 29 2006 06:50:23 by AirWillie6475

Sponsor Message:
Printer friendly format