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Air Brakes On Props?  
User currently offlineFlyboy80 From United States of America, joined Jul 2001, 1876 posts, RR: 3
Posted (10 years 5 months 2 weeks 5 days 18 hours ago) and read 3241 times:

I was simply wondering if there are any tubo prop commercial airliners "out there" that have air brakes? thanks for any info!

19 replies: All unread, jump to last
 
User currently offlineEMBQA From United States of America, joined Oct 2003, 9364 posts, RR: 11
Reply 1, posted (10 years 5 months 2 weeks 5 days 18 hours ago) and read 3143 times:

Airbrakes...........??? As in...? for the landing gear/wheels.....?

No aircraft offer 'air brakes' that I'm aware of. Gases do not offer as much compressibility force as a liquid will.



"It's not the size of the dog in the fight, but the size of the fight in the dog"
User currently offlineFlyboy80 From United States of America, joined Jul 2001, 1876 posts, RR: 3
Reply 2, posted (10 years 5 months 2 weeks 5 days 18 hours ago) and read 3115 times:

I mean the things on the wings which are refered to as air brakes, maybe they are sometimes called spoilers?

User currently offlineJayspilot From United States of America, joined May 2001, 298 posts, RR: 0
Reply 3, posted (10 years 5 months 2 weeks 5 days 18 hours ago) and read 3097 times:

if you are talking about spoilers or speed brakes.. if so, yea some do.. i know the dash does...dornier does, beech doesn't .. not sure about ATR or SAAB. they arent' needed as much on a propeller aircraft, due to the fact that changing of the blade angle bringing back the power levers back creates a lot of drag and allows the planes to slow quick.. hope this answers your question

User currently offlinePropjock04 From United States of America, joined Dec 2003, 76 posts, RR: 0
Reply 4, posted (10 years 5 months 2 weeks 5 days 17 hours ago) and read 3051 times:

The Jetstream 41 has spoilers...used only on the ground.

Michael


User currently offlineAccess-Air From United States of America, joined Sep 2000, 1939 posts, RR: 13
Reply 5, posted (10 years 5 months 2 weeks 5 days 17 hours ago) and read 2989 times:

The Fairchild Hiller FH-227 used its main landing gear as a speed brake inflight to lose altitude quick as well as speed. This was also the case on some of the later versions of the Fairchild F-27 series....
Dont think that Fokker ever employed this feature on their F.27s....

Access-Air



Remember, Wherever you go, there you are!!!!
User currently offlineScooterTrash From United States of America, joined Aug 2001, 569 posts, RR: 9
Reply 6, posted (10 years 5 months 2 weeks 5 days 17 hours ago) and read 2948 times:

I have flown the ATR as well as the Dash 8. No speed brakes per say on either aircraft. However, as was stated above, bringing the props to max rpm and the power levers to flight idle will result in the props becoming a very effective speed brake (high rpm, low pitch).

User currently offlineFlyboy80 From United States of America, joined Jul 2001, 1876 posts, RR: 3
Reply 7, posted (10 years 5 months 2 weeks 5 days 15 hours ago) and read 2885 times:

Yeah, I have actually never noticed them on any props so to speak. BTW, are speed brakes and Spoilers the same thing?

User currently offlineJayspilot From United States of America, joined May 2001, 298 posts, RR: 0
Reply 8, posted (10 years 5 months 2 weeks 5 days 15 hours ago) and read 2855 times:

Speed brakes and spoilers are the same parts moving on the plane.. Flight spoilers don't deploy to the same angles as ground spoilers and and not as many of the panels move for flight. As for not noticing them on props, the only ones I've seen that have them are high wings so you can't see them from inside, only notice them while holding short behind them or watching one land

User currently offlineMiles_mechanic From Canada, joined Sep 2001, 136 posts, RR: 0
Reply 9, posted (10 years 5 months 2 weeks 5 days 15 hours ago) and read 2821 times:

Hey, as far as the Dash 8 goes, the 300 and 400 series do have spoilers.

As for actual air brakes, the Fokker F-27, was a pneumatic system, so the brakes, and other systems relied on air pressure to operate. It was a good system meaning you would never run out of supply, but in the winter months up here in Canada, it also became a curse when moisture would get in the lines and freeze. I have heard a few stories from friends who used to work on them and enjoyed working on them, but the winter time caused headaches.

Regards

Miles


User currently offlineSkydrolBoy From Canada, joined Sep 2003, 341 posts, RR: 2
Reply 10, posted (10 years 5 months 2 weeks 5 days 13 hours ago) and read 2785 times:

The Dash-8 100's and 200's also have spoilers

User currently offlineMiles_mechanic From Canada, joined Sep 2001, 136 posts, RR: 0
Reply 11, posted (10 years 5 months 2 weeks 5 days 13 hours ago) and read 2754 times:

Hey Skydrol, you are absolutely right about the Dash 8s', sorry about that, I ment to say that they were automatically activated on the 300 and 400 models, where the early ones it was a manual system, from what I had read about them.

Thanks for correcting me

Miles


User currently offlineL-188 From United States of America, joined Jul 1999, 29791 posts, RR: 58
Reply 12, posted (10 years 5 months 2 weeks 5 days 8 hours ago) and read 2707 times:

Most props can slow down just fine by pulling back the power, those props are pretty draggy.

Kind of like downshifting a car going down a hill.



OBAMA-WORST PRESIDENT EVER....Even SKOORB would be better.
User currently offlineFredT From United Kingdom, joined Feb 2002, 2185 posts, RR: 26
Reply 13, posted (10 years 5 months 2 weeks 5 days 6 hours ago) and read 2637 times:

No speed brakes or spoilers on the Saab 340/2000. I've heard that they can be rather slick at times, even with flight idle set.

Cheers,
Fred



I thought I was doing good trying to avoid those airport hotels... and look at me now.
User currently offlineSlamClick From United States of America, joined Nov 2003, 10062 posts, RR: 68
Reply 14, posted (10 years 5 months 2 weeks 5 days 3 hours ago) and read 2594 times:

To be more accurate:

Spoilers "Spoil" the wing shape. They are hinged panels that deflect, usually up, from the surface of the wing. They have two modes:

  • Flight Spoilers kill some of the lift and allow quicker deceleration in level flight or steeper descents without airspeed gain. They may or may not include all of the available panels but will usually only allow partial extension.



  • Ground Spoilers include all panels to full extension. On ground contact, either strut compression or wheel spinup, kill most of the lift, transferring the weight of the plane to the wheels allowing effective braking. Remember, a moment earlier the wings were carrying the weight and the brakes would just lock the wheels if used.


  • Speed Brakes Are mounted on the fuselage or even the vertical tail in some military models. On the Fokker F-28 and F-100 and the BAe-146 they are the rearmost part of the fuselage, just below the rudder. They add drag but do not affect the lift being generated.




    Happiness is not seeing another trite Ste. Maarten photo all week long.
    User currently offlineBragi From Iceland, joined May 2001, 218 posts, RR: 0
    Reply 15, posted (10 years 5 months 2 weeks 5 days 3 hours ago) and read 2593 times:

    If you want to slow down a turboprop, it´s simply enough to reduce the power.

    The slow moving propeller blades act as a kind of air brakes.
    I don´t know about a turboprop fitted with air brakes.



    Muhammad Ali: "Superman don’t need no seat belt." Flight Attendant: "Superman don’t need no airplane, either."
    User currently offlineSlamClick From United States of America, joined Nov 2003, 10062 posts, RR: 68
    Reply 16, posted (10 years 5 months 2 weeks 5 days 3 hours ago) and read 2595 times:

    Bragi

    True enough. The drag of those props does a good job.
    Turboprop with speed brakes, one model of the Grumman OV-1 Mohawk. Could not find a picture of the brakes in this db though.




    Happiness is not seeing another trite Ste. Maarten photo all week long.
    User currently offlineScooterTrash From United States of America, joined Aug 2001, 569 posts, RR: 9
    Reply 17, posted (10 years 5 months 2 weeks 4 days 17 hours ago) and read 2496 times:

    True about the Dash 8's spoilers. They function in two regimes: In flight, they act as roll control augmentation and on the ground they act as lift dumping devices. There are four panels on the upper wing. They all act to assist roll control below 140 knots TAS. Above 140 knots, only the inboard spoilers operate. They are not used as speed brakes during flight.

    The Dash 8-100 and some -300's are equipped with another set of panels, called "ground spoilers" to further dump lift during the landing roll out. Many operators have deactivated these to save maintaining costs.

    The ATRs also have "spoilerons" to assist with roll control.


    User currently offlineMYT332 From United Kingdom, joined Sep 2003, 9112 posts, RR: 71
    Reply 18, posted (10 years 5 months 2 weeks 4 days 2 hours ago) and read 2432 times:

    The Dash7 have them to assist with STOL.
    -
    Alex




    One Life, Live it.
    User currently offlineFrancoflier From France, joined Oct 2001, 3736 posts, RR: 11
    Reply 19, posted (10 years 5 months 2 weeks 3 days 15 hours ago) and read 2387 times:

    The LET 410 has spoilers on the wing. They are used to shorten landing distance and may only be deployed on the ground or at a max "altitude" of 2 feet above the ground, but never during flight... (a friend of mine who tried could tell you that...)

    The Jetstream 31 have what they call a "lift dump" which simply consists of the wing flaps going down almost vertical after touchdown. (Only on the ground too..)

    The F-227 used its main gear as a speed brake, as mentioned above, which very often caused the crews to receive warning from other caring crews saying that their nose gear hadn't come down...
    BTW, Fokker enthusiats are never out of compliments for that pneumatic system, but in the end, it caused more trouble than it solved. As in: too many leaks, that are impossible to find, water freezing in the lines (mentioned above) and the all too common case of the A/C collapsing on the ground because someone forgot to put the ldg gear pins on and all the air finally leaked from the actuator...

    Just a few more example of "speed brakes" or "lift dump" devices on turboprop but I don't know of one having proper "speed brakes" either...



    Looks like I picked the wrong week to quit posting...
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