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What's An A340's Nosegear Turning Limit?  
User currently offlineMr Spaceman From Canada, joined Mar 2001, 2787 posts, RR: 9
Posted (10 years 7 months 1 week 3 days 9 hours ago) and read 2531 times:

Hi guys.

I know the turning limits of many airliners has been discussed here in the past, but I did a search for the answer to this A340 question and had no luck.

So, because the photo below of an A340-642 is begging me to ask ..........

What is the turning limits for an A340-6's nosegear?

The nosegear on the A340 in the photo looks like it's being cranked around pretty far. It looks like it's turned 90 degrees to the left!  Wow!


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Photo © Andreas Müller



Chris  Smile


"Just a minute while I re-invent myself"
7 replies: All unread, jump to last
 
User currently offlineQantasA332 From Australia, joined Dec 2003, 1500 posts, RR: 25
Reply 1, posted (10 years 7 months 1 week 3 days 8 hours ago) and read 2494 times:

I could very well be +/- 90 degrees. This probably doesn't help, but other aircraft nose wheel limits are:

737: +/- 75 degrees
DC-8: +/- 74.5 degrees
DC-9: +/- 80 degrees
767: +/- 65 degrees

Cheers,
QantasA332


User currently offlineMr Spaceman From Canada, joined Mar 2001, 2787 posts, RR: 9
Reply 2, posted (10 years 7 months 1 week 3 days 8 hours ago) and read 2476 times:

Hello QantasA332.

Sure, I think the info you provided helps because it shows a DC-9 with a limit of +/- 80, so it's not unlikely that this Airbus's nosegear is turned that far at least.

Even though it's nosegear looks like it's turned 90 degrees, it's probably less than that.

I do have one question however, about the limits you listed. Why are they shown as +/- limits, and not as set limits? Is there a tolerance built in to protect the nosegear incase a tug driver accidently turns the gear a few degrees past the posted limit?

I'm not nick-picking, I'm just wondering. Big grin

Chris  Smile



"Just a minute while I re-invent myself"
User currently offlineQantasA332 From Australia, joined Dec 2003, 1500 posts, RR: 25
Reply 3, posted (10 years 7 months 1 week 3 days 8 hours ago) and read 2476 times:

I do have one question however, about the limits you listed. Why are they shown as +/- limits, and not as set limits? Is there a tolerance built in to protect the nosegear incase a tug driver accidently turns the gear a few degrees past the posted limit?

I don't know the exact answer but yes, I think the limits definitely have a bit of a buffer in case of "over-angling"...

Cheers,
QantasA332


User currently offlineBio15 From Colombia, joined Mar 2001, 1089 posts, RR: 7
Reply 4, posted (10 years 7 months 1 week 3 days 8 hours ago) and read 2475 times:

Tell me if I'm wrong, but I think the +/- means from -xx degrees to +xx degrees. I am sure there is a small tolerance, but it is probably very small (not mentionable) - especially considering that the deflection angle is given to a precision of .5 degrees which is real small-. This is just a guess though, let the experts reveal the truth  Smile

-Alfredo


User currently offlineFlysab From Belgium, joined Nov 1999, 106 posts, RR: 5
Reply 5, posted (10 years 7 months 1 week 2 days 18 hours ago) and read 1907 times:

For A340-200 and -300, and for A330, the angle of deflection is 72° each side.
This gives a turning radius of 44 meters to make a 180° for the A330-200.

For A340-500 and -600 I do not know.


User currently offlineVC-10 From United Kingdom, joined Oct 1999, 3701 posts, RR: 34
Reply 6, posted (10 years 7 months 1 week 2 days 16 hours ago) and read 1888 times:
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A346 max steering angle is +/- 75 degrees. The +/- isn't a tolerance but means 75 degs left(+) and 75 degs right(-)

User currently offlineMr Spaceman From Canada, joined Mar 2001, 2787 posts, RR: 9
Reply 7, posted (10 years 7 months 1 week 2 days 9 hours ago) and read 1834 times:

Hi guys.

Thank You, for your information.

> VC-10, Thanks for your specific info about the A346's steering limit and the clarification that the +/- means 75 degrees to the left or right.

The nose gear on the A346 in the photo must be turned all the way to it's 75 degrees limit because it looks like it's turned to almost 90 degrees! Must be an illusion. Big grin

Chris  Smile



"Just a minute while I re-invent myself"
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