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Transition Levels  
User currently offlineFoxbravo03 From Ireland, joined Mar 2004, 38 posts, RR: 0
Posted (10 years 5 months 1 week 3 days 12 hours ago) and read 1186 times:
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Hello,
Can anyone explain what in ATC parlance is meant by "Transition Level"?
Regards,
foxbravo03

5 replies: All unread, jump to last
 
User currently offlineJhooper From United States of America, joined Dec 2001, 6204 posts, RR: 12
Reply 1, posted (10 years 5 months 1 week 3 days 12 hours ago) and read 1161 times:

That should be 18,000 ft MSL, when all aircraft transition to the jet routes and use 29.92 as the altimeter setting.


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User currently offlineB747Skipper From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 2, posted (10 years 5 months 1 week 3 days 12 hours ago) and read 1156 times:

Dear Foxbravo03 -
xxx
Our friend Jhooper gave it to you - for USA... But I see you are in Ireland.
Dont have the Shannon or Dublin approaches handy.
But I will give it to you the Irish ATC way...
xxx
"Clear to (descend) 4,000 feet, transition level 50, QNH is 1007 hPa..."
At 5,000 feet (TRLVL 50) the pilots will reset their altimeter to 1007.
xxx
Transition level vary just about everywhere, in USA, it is 180...
xxx
Happy contrails  Smile
(s) Skipper


User currently offlineFoxbravo03 From Ireland, joined Mar 2004, 38 posts, RR: 0
Reply 3, posted (10 years 5 months 1 week 3 days 11 hours ago) and read 1144 times:
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Hello again,
Thanks very much,Jhooper,and B747Skipper.I guessed there would probably be a difference between the US and Europe.
Thanks again,
foxbravo03.


User currently offlineTs-ior From Tunisia, joined Oct 2001, 3462 posts, RR: 6
Reply 4, posted (10 years 5 months 1 week 3 days 10 hours ago) and read 1115 times:


Generally it is FL30 or 3.000 ft.It is the level below or above which altitude is stated whether in feet or in FL respectively.



User currently offlineInbound From Trinidad and Tobago, joined Sep 2001, 851 posts, RR: 2
Reply 5, posted (10 years 5 months 1 week 3 days 8 hours ago) and read 1029 times:

http://www.airliners.net/discussions/tech_ops/read.main/77303/


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