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How Much Fuel Can A 747 Carry?  
User currently offlineSpotterboy From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Posted (10 years 6 months 2 weeks 5 days 3 hours ago) and read 23022 times:

Hi!

I wonder how much is the fuel capacity of a B747-400. And how much fuel does a B747-400 burn on a Transatlantic flight... ( no matter which destinations, flight alt or speed ) ... just on average please

Thanks,



[Edited 2004-03-17 17:03:18]

20 replies: All unread, jump to last
 
User currently offlineAndrej From United Kingdom, joined Jun 2001, 987 posts, RR: 0
Reply 1, posted (10 years 6 months 2 weeks 5 days 2 hours ago) and read 22988 times:

Hello,

fuel capacity varies from airline and type of airplane. Is it cargo or passanger? Thus capacity can be from 163 tons to 176 tons.

I believe that B744 usually takes 10tons of fuel for one flying hour. It should be more for the first flying hour. Please correct me if i am wrong.

Thanks.
Andrej


User currently offlineB747Skipper From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 2, posted (10 years 6 months 2 weeks 5 days 2 hours ago) and read 22976 times:

Dear Andrej -
xxx
You are very well informed, your numbers are quite correct  Big grin
I do not fly the 400, I only fly the 200s, but I know their fuel numbers...
A heavy cargo may burn a little more per hour.
But typical JFK to LHR would be the figures you indicated.
They fill their tanks to some 90 tons for such flight.
They land with some 15 tons remaining, maybe 20 at most.
xxx
Happy contrails -
(s) Skipper


User currently offlineStarlionblue From Greenland, joined Feb 2004, 17054 posts, RR: 67
Reply 3, posted (10 years 6 months 2 weeks 5 days 2 hours ago) and read 22967 times:

After some digging, I found that: "The 747-400 can carry more than 57,000 gallons of fuel (215,745 L)"


"There are no stupid questions, but there are a lot of inquisitive idiots."
User currently offlineMrwayne From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 4, posted (10 years 6 months 2 weeks 5 days 2 hours ago) and read 22945 times:

A 747/400 can carry roughly 206,250 litres / 165000 kgs of fuel, it all depends on the S.G meaning weather conditions.

It burns roughly 10 tonnes of fuel an hour.


User currently offlineStarlionblue From Greenland, joined Feb 2004, 17054 posts, RR: 67
Reply 5, posted (10 years 6 months 2 weeks 5 days ago) and read 22916 times:

By taking my head out of my ass for a moment, I found out that with the optional horizontal stabilizer tank, the 744 can carry 215,991 to 216,824 litres (173,424 to 174,093kg) of "usable fuel" (whatever that means). Without the extra tank, it can carry 203,493 to 204,333 litres (163,396 to 164,064kg).

The 744F can carry more if optional body tanks are installed. Up to 240,196 litres (192,860 kg)

Starlionblue (putting head back in his ass) hopes that he didn't get the numbers wrong.



"There are no stupid questions, but there are a lot of inquisitive idiots."
User currently offlineKYIPpilot From United States of America, joined Oct 2003, 1383 posts, RR: 6
Reply 6, posted (10 years 6 months 2 weeks 4 days 23 hours ago) and read 22895 times:

Starlion, "usable fuel" means fuel that you can use, as far as regs are concerned, until you need to get more. Therefore, "unusable fuel" is the minimum amount of fuel that an airplane should ever land with. You are not supposed to fly past your usable fuel limit, or you risk running out.

I hope that makes sense. Someone else may explain it better.



"It starts when you're always afraid; You step out of line, the man come and take you away" -Buffalo Springfield
User currently offlineFlightSimFreak From United States of America, joined Oct 2000, 720 posts, RR: 0
Reply 7, posted (10 years 6 months 2 weeks 4 days 12 hours ago) and read 22791 times:

KYIPpilot: In GA, I'm not sure if it's the same as in the airline world, but in GA, usable fuel is the fuel that can be sucked out of the tanks... The unusable fuel is there to catch contaminates that settle out. For example, the warrior I fly has 2 25 gallon tanks, but only 48 gallons total usable gallons. Because of the shape of the tanks and the position of the intakes, there is one gallon in each tank that the engine cannot get. In theory, this is where the water and muck in the fuel will go.

User currently offlineB747Skipper From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 8, posted (10 years 6 months 2 weeks 4 days 11 hours ago) and read 22786 times:

GA or airlines - same definitions -
xxx
Usable fuel - fuel in the tank that can be "pumped" for use in engines. Level flight.
Unusable fuel - residual fuel at bottom of tank, cannot be pumped out. Could be drained out.
That is the fuel that is located "below" the fuel pump(s)...
xxx
Unusable fuel is not accounted as fuel "available". It is part of the basic "empty" operating weight.
In a 747, may be some 300-500 kg...
xxx
Happy contrails  Smile
(s) Skipper


User currently offlineB747Skipper From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 9, posted (10 years 6 months 2 weeks 4 days 10 hours ago) and read 22772 times:

Slight correction -
There is also reference made to "undrainable fuel" -
Fuel that is below the level of fuel drains...
xxx
Again, the only fuel of concern to flying is "USABLE FUEL"...
xxx
Happy contrails  Smile
(s) Skipper


User currently offlineStarlionblue From Greenland, joined Feb 2004, 17054 posts, RR: 67
Reply 10, posted (10 years 6 months 2 weeks 4 days 8 hours ago) and read 22750 times:

Thanks! That does explain a lot.

On a related note, I have heard of "gravity feed", specifically that the 737 can "gravity feed" both engines from either wing tank without operational fuel pumps. This seems logical given that the engines are under the wing.

But what about our tail mounted friends? What happens if the pumps break? Can they siphon it up like a petrol thief?



"There are no stupid questions, but there are a lot of inquisitive idiots."
User currently offlineB747Skipper From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 11, posted (10 years 6 months 2 weeks 4 days 8 hours ago) and read 22751 times:

Yes Starlionblue -
xxx
You can feed an engine that is "higher" than the tanks (i.e. 727, DC9)...
Fuel tanks are slightly pressurized, generally by "ram air"...
The more indicated airspeed, the more ram air pressure...
But yet it is quite low pressure, but sufficient to feed the engines somewhat.
Some airplanes need to descend to lower altitude when they have to feed engines that way.
Lower altitude, more indicated airspeed, more pressure.
xxx
Happy contrails  Smile
(s) Skipper


User currently offlineStarlionblue From Greenland, joined Feb 2004, 17054 posts, RR: 67
Reply 12, posted (10 years 6 months 2 weeks 4 days 8 hours ago) and read 22747 times:

Thanks Skipper. As always your explanations are much appreciated.


"There are no stupid questions, but there are a lot of inquisitive idiots."
User currently offlineB747Skipper From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 13, posted (10 years 6 months 2 weeks 4 days 8 hours ago) and read 22741 times:

I remember in my "long time" notes learning about Boeing planes, and having stayed awake in the classroom, mention was made of the figure of 0.8 psi "head of pressure", present in the tanks, excess pressure was vented overboard by relief valve which was set at that pressure number. Very low value indeed.
xxx
Happy contrails  Smile
(s) Skipper


User currently offlineSllevin From United States of America, joined Jan 2002, 3376 posts, RR: 6
Reply 14, posted (10 years 6 months 2 weeks 4 days 7 hours ago) and read 22723 times:

There's also one more case for "usable" fuel -- it is the fuel level that can be "accessed" during all permissible flight attitudes (i.e., higher bank angles). You might be able to pull that fuel while in straight and level flight, but not in a bank angle, say, turning downwind to base leg  Smile

Steve


User currently offlineB747skipper From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 15, posted (10 years 6 months 2 weeks 4 days 1 hour ago) and read 22669 times:

In the 747 we have a limitation with low fuel (less than 10 tonnes remaining).
Maximum nose up attitude 10 degrees in case of go around.
We also open all crossfeeds, and all main tank boost pumps must be ON.
xxx
Note that most airliners have 2 pumps per tank, one generally located forward, one located aft, so if nose up or nose down, one of the pump will still be able to get fuel.
xxx
Happy contrails  Smile
(s) Skipper


User currently offlineWannabe From United States of America, joined Jun 1999, 677 posts, RR: 3
Reply 16, posted (10 years 6 months 2 weeks 4 days ago) and read 22657 times:

Allright gang,
So far in this tread, I have seen fuel amounts measured in:
Tons (not sure if that is US or British)
liters
Kilograms
Gallons (not sure if it is US or Imperial)

Who makes sure that this 747-400 doesn't become the next Air Canada glider? What is (IF there is) the standard international unit of measurement for fuel?


User currently offlineMrwayne From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 17, posted (10 years 6 months 2 weeks 4 days ago) and read 22647 times:

Wannabe; fuel is measured in weight; in the UK and EU we measure in KGS ie;36500 kgs is 36.5 tonnes.

In the USA it is in Lbs and US Gals totally different from the UK/EU market.



User currently offlineB747skipper From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 18, posted (10 years 6 months 2 weeks 3 days 22 hours ago) and read 22632 times:

Dear Wannabe -
xxx
Big problem here, the USA has gallons and pounds. Nobody else does.
300 million people vs. humanity, of what, 4.5 billion?, in the rest of the world.
Europe, Asia, Africa, South America, Australasia, Canada is METRIC.
xxx
In the real world, fuel is sold in LITRES...
Airplanes and pilots fly with KILOS (or TONNES, which is 1,000 kilos)...
xxx
I just made an entry in "Fuel Query" here in Tech.Ops...
Suggest you have a look, some explanation of volume vs. weight...
I am just "metric"... I do not have Albert Einstein's brains...
xxx
Happy contrails  Smile
(s) Skipper



User currently offlineStarlionblue From Greenland, joined Feb 2004, 17054 posts, RR: 67
Reply 19, posted (10 years 6 months 2 weeks 3 days 21 hours ago) and read 22609 times:

To keep it simple, Boeing docs have litres, kilos and gallons. Of course, the ratio of volume to weight varies with temperature, but that's a whole other problem Big grin


"There are no stupid questions, but there are a lot of inquisitive idiots."
User currently offlineMoolies From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 20, posted (10 years 6 months 2 weeks 3 days 4 hours ago) and read 22531 times:

SAA in their inflight magazine say their 744 (if memory serves me correctly) carries 219000 litres.

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