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Aircraft Water  
User currently offlineJc5280 From United States of America, joined Oct 2001, 530 posts, RR: 5
Posted (10 years 4 months 3 days 11 hours ago) and read 8332 times:

Does any one know how much potable water goes on an aircraft? I am curious about planes like the A320, 777, etc. Thanks!

37 replies: All unread, showing first 25:
 
User currently offlineBusinessboy From Norway, joined Mar 2004, 211 posts, RR: 1
Reply 1, posted (10 years 4 months 3 days 11 hours ago) and read 8243 times:

I was just wondering about that myself!

Anybody who knows???

 Smile

[Edited 2004-03-28 11:44:36]


LOVE CONTINENTAL AIRLINES & LOVE BRITISH AIRWAYS
User currently offlineLongHauler From Canada, joined Mar 2004, 4913 posts, RR: 43
Reply 2, posted (10 years 4 months 3 days 6 hours ago) and read 8139 times:

Air Canada's A319s, A320s and A321s hold 200L. It appears to be enough for our longest flights, (about 6 hours).


Never gonna grow up, never gonna slow down .... Barefoot Blue Jean Night
User currently offlineRefueler1974 From United States of America, joined Mar 2004, 235 posts, RR: 0
Reply 3, posted (10 years 4 months 3 days 1 hour ago) and read 8005 times:

I don't know about all aircraft, but L1011s and MD11s hold about 100 USG and B742s hold about 150-200 USG.


The only time you have too much fuel is when you're on fire.
User currently offlineJc5280 From United States of America, joined Oct 2001, 530 posts, RR: 5
Reply 4, posted (10 years 4 months 2 days 11 hours ago) and read 7844 times:

Help me out with the conversion. How many USG is 200L? Also, is all of this water put in one tank? Or several?

User currently offlineAirframeAS From United States of America, joined Feb 2004, 14150 posts, RR: 24
Reply 5, posted (10 years 4 months 2 days 11 hours ago) and read 7809 times:

On a B737, the potable water tank is in the aft cargo pit behind the last wall under the aft galley just right in front of the pressurized bulkhead. The tank itself is made out of composite materials and fiberglass. The tank is about 4 feet long and 2 feet tall, but I dont remember how much water the tank itself can hold. The 737s only have one potable water tank. In a c-check, the tank was very very hard to take out and put back in.


A Safe Flight Begins With Quality Maintenance On The Ground.
User currently offlineAlessandro From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 6, posted (10 years 4 months 2 days 11 hours ago) and read 7782 times:

Would it be possible to take water from humid air that goes into the aircondition? Or is it too complicated,expensive and heavy?


User currently offlineSailorOrion From Germany, joined Feb 2001, 2058 posts, RR: 6
Reply 7, posted (10 years 4 months 2 days 11 hours ago) and read 7748 times:

For rough computations, one USG is around 3,7liters.

A380-800:

normal: 1,7m³
optional: 2,3m³

(that's 449 and 598 USGAL for those of you who work at Lockheed Martin).

But remember that airlines usually carry bottles of water as well Big grin

SailorOrion


User currently offlineStarlionblue From Greenland, joined Feb 2004, 16998 posts, RR: 67
Reply 8, posted (10 years 4 months 2 days 10 hours ago) and read 7721 times:

For really nitpicking converters, try: http://www.onlineconversion.com/volume.htm.

One cubic metre is 1000 liters and 1000 kilos (that last one is assuming it's distilled water) or 264.1720512 Gallons (US).



"There are no stupid questions, but there are a lot of inquisitive idiots."
User currently offline747Teach From United States of America, joined Nov 2000, 176 posts, RR: 1
Reply 9, posted (10 years 4 months 2 days 8 hours ago) and read 7677 times:

Jc5280: The 747 generally has the capacity of 330 gallons of potable water. This is held in three 110 gallon filament-wound fiberglass tanks attached to the forward side of the center section front spar (rear bulkhead of the forward baggage compartment). The water is moved from the tanks by pressurized air. This pressure is provided by electrically driven air compressors mounted next to the tanks. Not all operators use all three tanks. Depending on the length of the segments they intend to fly, some operators have deleted some of the tanks. 747 AMM, 38-11-00, page 1, pg 2. Regards,

User currently offlineKlaus From Germany, joined Jul 2001, 21406 posts, RR: 54
Reply 10, posted (10 years 4 months 2 days 7 hours ago) and read 7642 times:

From what I´ve read in earlier threads, the term "potable" water seems to be a minor overstatement... Any ground or air crew members here who would dare to drink it "fresh" from the tap?  Wink/being sarcastic

Just interested...  Innocent


User currently offlineMusang From United Kingdom, joined Apr 2001, 861 posts, RR: 7
Reply 11, posted (10 years 4 months 2 days 6 hours ago) and read 7583 times:

Klaus. I agree. Our company rule is not to uplift any potable water downroute (which means not in the UK). But based on what I've heard is in it, I wouldn't drink it wherever it came from.

Regards - Musang


User currently offlineMD11Engineer From Germany, joined Oct 2003, 13968 posts, RR: 63
Reply 12, posted (10 years 4 months 2 days 6 hours ago) and read 7580 times:

On the passenger MD-11 you can have up to four 63 USG tanks, the freighter usally has all removed exept for one. Mind that this water also serves for flushing the vacuum toilets if installed. The tanks sit in the utility tunnels (behind the sidewall) of the forward cargo compartment.
Here the water used for servicing is usually chlorinated potable water, but you´ll never know who services the tank down line. Usually the galleys contain an antibiological filter (AFIAK it contains silver ions) for the taps and coffee makers, which get changed regularely. Also the tanks will be desinfected every few weeks, normaly during an A-check.

Jan


User currently offlineDalMD88 From United States of America, joined Jul 2000, 2534 posts, RR: 14
Reply 13, posted (10 years 4 months 2 days 4 hours ago) and read 7539 times:

Not all 737 have the tank in the aft. Our -200 have them mounted in the fwd pit on the left wall. As for the quality of the water, I wouldn't drink out of one of those tanks. I do drink the coffee since the water gets boiled first.

User currently offlineDAirbus From United States of America, joined Nov 2003, 593 posts, RR: 2
Reply 14, posted (10 years 4 months 1 day 17 hours ago) and read 7370 times:
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Here is some data for Delta's fleet:

MD88/90 47USG (177.9L)
732/733 40USG (151.2L)
738 60USG (226.8L)
757 66USG (249.8L)-Fill valve closes automatically at 50USG (189.3L)
762/763 120USG (453.6L)-Fill valve closes automatically at 102USG (385.5L)
763ER 160USG (600.6L)
764ER 224USG (847.9L)
772ER 300USG (1135.6L)
MD11 250USG (946.4L) Estimated

The MD88/90, 732/733, and MD11 have the potable water tank(s) in the forward fuselage. The other aircraft have the tank(s) in the aft fuselage. The MD11, 764, and 777 have two tanks while the rest of the fleet has only one. As stated in a previous post, the aircraft with vacuum lavatories have a larger water capacity since it is also used to flush the toilets.

It is standard practice to service the potable water as part of the ground servicing but in practice it is only done on RON aircraft and as needed during the day. With international flights, the water is always topped off and it is a high priority item. Most captains will not leave on an international flight unless their potable water is full. I am not 100% sure but I believe this is due to the fact that the local water is unreliable in some parts of the world and they want enough for the return trip if necessary. Also, after fuel, engine oil, and hydraulic fluid, water is the most vital operating fluid on an aircraft and has caused aircraft to divert if it malfunctions.

I hope this information helps. Regards.



"I love mankind. It's people I can't stand." - Charles Shultz
User currently offlineAtlamt From United States of America, joined Sep 2001, 240 posts, RR: 3
Reply 15, posted (10 years 4 months 1 day 6 hours ago) and read 7275 times:

I wouldn't drink the water, even the coffee. The coffee makers don't actually boil the water they just heat it up. Remember that at altitude the pressure in the cabin is less than on the ground so water will boil at a lot less than 212F.


Fwd to MCO and Placard
User currently offlineSrbmod From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 16, posted (10 years 4 months 18 hours ago) and read 7186 times:

I remember the potable water trucks @ FL @ ATL back when I worked there, they were some beat-up light pickup trucks with an agricultural tank mounted in the truck bed, with a pump and hose mounted where the passenger seat used to be. We filled it from a tap, but no telling how long that truck would sit out in the sun........ Same could be said of any potable water truck.

User currently offlineRefueler1974 From United States of America, joined Mar 2004, 235 posts, RR: 0
Reply 17, posted (10 years 3 months 3 weeks 5 days 21 hours ago) and read 7023 times:

I would rather have the potable water truck instead of the setup we have. All we have are 5 gallon Kentwood water bottles and a portable pump that has a long plastic tube on one end (this sticks into the top of the water bottle) and a line that connects to the aircraft. We then connect the pump to the battery of whatever vehicle we are in, and away we go!! Believe me...it takes a while to pump 50 or so gallons of water using this system.....but it is all we have for now! One of these days we might get to graduate up to having a "real" water truck......LOL


The only time you have too much fuel is when you're on fire.
User currently offlineT prop From United States of America, joined Apr 2001, 1023 posts, RR: 1
Reply 18, posted (10 years 3 months 3 weeks 4 days 12 hours ago) and read 6880 times:

Any ground or air crew members here who would dare to drink it "fresh" from the tap?

Only at gunpoint. Big grin

T prop.


User currently offlineEconoBoy From United Kingdom, joined Mar 2004, 157 posts, RR: 0
Reply 19, posted (10 years 3 months 3 weeks 4 days 8 hours ago) and read 6843 times:

Hmmm... I think the gist of this thread for us pax is to make sure you have plenty of bottled water with you before you board!

User currently offlinePrebennorholm From Denmark, joined Mar 2000, 6387 posts, RR: 54
Reply 20, posted (10 years 3 months 3 weeks 3 days 23 hours ago) and read 6771 times:

Alessandro: Would it be possible to take water from humid air that goes into the aircondition?

No, that doesn't work.

We all know the water running from the aircon in our car, but in an airliner the situation is quite different.

The aircon in our car cools hot and humid air. The airliner heats dry air. In fact very cold and therefore VERY dry air.

After some time at cruising altitude the relative humidity is often as low as 5% in an airliner cabin and on very long flight that's sort of a problem to some people. Normal livingroom humidity is most comfu around 50% or so. Flying 10 or 15 hours, be sure that you drink enough, or you may suffer slightly from dehydration.

If you go and buy one of the very long range Gulfstream biz jets, then you have the option to invest in a special aircon system which ADDS water to the cabin air for comfort reasons. I don't have the figures available, but it takes a lot of water from a quite substantial tank to raise the cabin air humidity from 5% to just 25-30% during a 15 hours flight. And of course it has to be distilled water.

Happy landing, Preben Norholm



Always keep your number of landings equal to your number of take-offs, Preben Norholm
User currently offlineKlaus From Germany, joined Jul 2001, 21406 posts, RR: 54
Reply 21, posted (10 years 3 months 3 weeks 3 days 7 hours ago) and read 6693 times:

Klaus: Any ground or air crew members here who would dare to drink it "fresh" from the tap?

T prop: Only at gunpoint.

Thought so.  Wink/being sarcastic


User currently offlineAlessandro From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 22, posted (10 years 3 months 3 weeks 3 days 2 hours ago) and read 6650 times:

Preben, check this out http://www.airdisaster.com/forums/viewtopic.php?t=17184


User currently offlinePrebennorholm From Denmark, joined Mar 2000, 6387 posts, RR: 54
Reply 23, posted (10 years 3 months 3 weeks 3 days ago) and read 6643 times:

Thanks Allessandro.

But the space crafts or space stations are an entirely different animals. They have to recycle the atmosphere, constantly add oxygen and remove vapor from sweat etc. And somehow the crew gets used to live with the rest which soon becomes a rather smelly stuff.

In an airliner we constantly renew the cabin air with fresh air from outside. And at 30 or 40,000 feet the air happens to be extremely dry.

It would be possible to extract some of the little water which comes with the air. But it would be very costly in energy to do so. It might end up spending more fuel than the water it produced.

To extract water you have to cool the air below the dew point. At cruising altitude the temperature is something like minus 50 deg. C or colder. And the dew point is much lower. You would probably have to cool enormous amounts of air to minus 100 deg. C to extract some of the very little water there is.

So for all practical reasons, it is not possible.



Always keep your number of landings equal to your number of take-offs, Preben Norholm
User currently offlineAlessandro From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 24, posted (10 years 3 months 3 weeks 2 days 14 hours ago) and read 6593 times:

Preben, I don´t believe that, too expensive to get new air from the outside all the time, I think the ventilation recycle the air (which was the problem with SARS and other airborne diseases) in a big commercial passengerplane because it´s too expensive to heat (also not so much oxygen in the air at higher altitude).
Perhaps you only got experience with biz-jets which got a different economical
situation than as an example B747?


[Edited 2004-04-07 09:44:45]

25 Liamksa : I think the ventilation recycle the air (which was the problem with SARS and other airborne diseases) in a big commercial passengerplane because it´s
26 Post contains images MxCtrlr : I think the ventilation recycle the air (which was the problem with SARS and other airborne diseases) in a big commercial passengerplane because it´s
27 Post contains images Kaddyuk : Nothing but evian on Virgin Atlantic
28 Post contains images Beechcraft : Hi, As for the CRJ 200/700 its a Galley water tank of 8 USG/30L a Lavatory water tank of 5 USG/ 19L and a toilet water tank of 18,5 USG/ 70L reagrding
29 Post contains images Greasespot : There is not a chance I would ever drink the water from a tap on any airplane. We had one freeze and burst when someone forgot to drain it and the A/C
30 Buckfifty : You can see it in the galleys, the pax get the tap water (which is same as the water from the lav facuets). When the pax leave, then they refill the c
31 Thunderbird1 : Interesting article about this just came out http://story.news.yahoo.com/news?tmpl=story&cid=514&e=5&u=/ap/20050119/ap_on_he_me/airlines_unsafe_water
32 Thunderbird1 : Does anyone know what the main water tanks (serving the galley, etc) are made of? Are they some sort of plastic?
33 Air2gxs : Normally composite materials. I believe its a fiberglass wrapped plastic tank.
34 Tod : 747 generally has the capacity of 330 gallons of potable water. This is held in three 110 gallon filament-wound fiberglass tanks Some 742 have only tw
35 320tech : The A320 has a 200 L (55 US Gal) water tank. It's located behind the aft wall of the forward cargo, right ahead of the wing. In the A319, it's right b
36 Post contains links BuyantUkhaa : Today in Airwise: http://news.airwise.com/story/view/1106215373.html Airline Water Quality Still Poor January 20, 2005 The US government has found for
37 HAWK21M : B732 is approx 40 US Gallons. regds MEL
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