Sponsor Message:
Aviation Technical / Operations Forum
My Starred Topics | Profile | New Topic | Forum Index | Help | Search 
Slotted Flaps A Thing Of The Past  
User currently offlineKBUF737 From United States of America, joined Dec 2003, 779 posts, RR: 3
Posted (10 years 9 months 4 days 13 hours ago) and read 3172 times:

Are slotted flaps, which used to be considered such a breakthrough more of a thing of the past? I notice more and more newer planes appear to have more "single unit" style flaps which look more blunt and drag enducing imo.


The tower? Rapunzel!!!!!!
7 replies: All unread, jump to last
 
User currently offlineRalgha From United States of America, joined Nov 1999, 1614 posts, RR: 6
Reply 1, posted (10 years 9 months 4 days 5 hours ago) and read 3083 times:

Cessnas use slotted flaps. 'nuff said.


09 F9 11 02 9D 74 E3 5B D8 41 56 C5 63 56 88 C0
User currently offlineDufo From Slovenia, joined May 1999, 811 posts, RR: 4
Reply 2, posted (10 years 9 months 4 days 5 hours ago) and read 3067 times:

Which ones, Ralgha?

. .



I seriously think I just creamed my pants without any influence from any outside variables.
User currently offlineRalgha From United States of America, joined Nov 1999, 1614 posts, RR: 6
Reply 3, posted (10 years 9 months 3 days 18 hours ago) and read 3005 times:

Most of the single engines. Some of the older models don't have any flaps, and some of the older ones may be plain flaps, but most are slotted.


09 F9 11 02 9D 74 E3 5B D8 41 56 C5 63 56 88 C0
User currently offlineNWA ARJ From United States of America, joined May 2001, 547 posts, RR: 1
Reply 4, posted (10 years 9 months 2 days 20 hours ago) and read 2876 times:

Our Warriors at UND also use the slotted flaps. I would not say that they are a thing of the past.


Nightmare 68, Fargo Tower, Runway 36, Fly Runway Heading, Mantain 10,000, Cleared For Takeoff, Change To Departure
User currently offline7574EVER From United States of America, joined Jan 2004, 478 posts, RR: 4
Reply 5, posted (10 years 9 months 2 days 19 hours ago) and read 2863 times:

I think KBUF737 may be referring to the flaps on airliners that come out in sections rather than one piece. The 737 for example:


737-300 "old flaps"


View Large View Medium
Click here for bigger photo!

Photo © Aaron 747



737-800 "new flaps"


View Large View Medium
Click here for bigger photo!

Photo © Dan Rabolt



If this is what you meant then you are just mistaken about what a slotted flap is. (no worries, I can easily see why you may make this mistake) It doesn't mean that it comes out in sections but rather there is a gap between the flap and the trailing edge of the wing where some of the air from below the wing can come up and move over the top of the flap.



Right rudder....Right rudder...Come on, more right rudder....Right rudder......Aw forget it, I quit!!
User currently offlineKBUF737 From United States of America, joined Dec 2003, 779 posts, RR: 3
Reply 6, posted (10 years 9 months 2 days 14 hours ago) and read 2827 times:

Yeah thats what i mean. They seem to be shying away from those sectioned flaps.


The tower? Rapunzel!!!!!!
User currently offlineMusang From United Kingdom, joined Apr 2001, 872 posts, RR: 7
Reply 7, posted (10 years 9 months 2 days 5 hours ago) and read 2782 times:

Cessnas and pre-NG 737s both had slotted flaps. Cessnas are single slotted, Boeings are up to Triple slotted. As long as there's a slot somewhere.

Its a question of efficiency vs. weight/complexity.

Multiple slotted flaps are traditionally more efficient, but heavy and complicated. Apparently Boeing now have found a double slotted design for the NG 737s which does as well as the original triple slotted types.

The 747SP used a single slotted flap, the other versions used a triple. Less weight, less drag through not needing such large track fairings, but I believe I'm correct in saying it wasn't as efficient. It didn't need to be however, since the same wing (dimensionally) was lifting a much smaller airplane, and reasonable take-off/approach speeds were attainable.

Incidentally the SP flap translation path was interesting. The flap leading edge didn't simply move aft along a track like a Cessna while the trailing edge moved aft/down. The LE moved aft and down on a pivot arm, so it was significantly below the undersurface of the wing. This I recall from the diagrams in a South African Airways 747SP differences manual I read on the flight deck of one over the Indian Ocean, and look forward to a more accurate description from someone who knows what he/she is talking about!!

Regards - Musang


Top Of Page
Forum Index

Reply To This Topic Slotted Flaps A Thing Of The Past
Username:
No username? Sign up now!
Password: 


Forgot Password? Be reminded.
Remember me on this computer (uses cookies)
  • Tech/Ops related posts only!
  • Not Tech/Ops related? Use the other forums
  • No adverts of any kind. This includes web pages.
  • No hostile language or criticizing of others.
  • Do not post copyright protected material.
  • Use relevant and describing topics.
  • Check if your post already been discussed.
  • Check your spelling!
  • DETAILED RULES
Add Images Add SmiliesPosting Help

Please check your spelling (press "Check Spelling" above)


Similar topics:More similar topics...
Are Propfans A Thing Of The Past? posted Tue Dec 21 2004 07:46:57 by Mepjap65
SOP's Of The Past That Would Be Frightening Today posted Thu Oct 27 2005 06:54:26 by 2H4
JetMech's Technical Tour Of The Trent 700. posted Fri Oct 27 2006 19:16:21 by JetMech
The Size Of The 747 Freighter Opening posted Sat Oct 21 2006 11:34:47 by NZ107
Why The Little Hole At The Bottom Of The Window? posted Tue Oct 17 2006 03:19:07 by Gh123
A320 Questions Of The Day posted Sun Oct 1 2006 22:29:22 by Symphonik
Speed Of Air Out Of The GE-90-115's Back End posted Sun Sep 10 2006 01:47:24 by UAL747
The End Of The Lame? posted Sat Sep 9 2006 22:40:07 by MD11Engineer
Turbofan Derivative Of The P&W JT-4? posted Fri Sep 8 2006 21:31:23 by A342
What's This Thing Near The Nosewheel? posted Thu Jul 20 2006 12:42:54 by Varig767

Sponsor Message:
Printer friendly format