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Stupidest Thing You Ever Did "aviation Related"...  
User currently offlineJETPILOT From United States of America, joined May 1999, 3130 posts, RR: 29
Posted (13 years 10 months 3 weeks 3 days 1 hour ago) and read 5108 times:

I took my position and hold to depart waiting for my clearance. Upon being cleared for takeoff I started my takeoff roll had to abort for an airspeed indicator malfunction.

I went back wrote the plane up and handed in a write up to maintenance.

It just so happens they knew about it and and told me to take the plane next to it. The one I should have taken in the first place. The one with the matching tail number that was on the paperwork. Uhhhhhhh......

Hey....The key fit.

JET



21 replies: All unread, jump to last
 
User currently offlineJETPILOT From United States of America, joined May 1999, 3130 posts, RR: 29
Reply 1, posted (13 years 10 months 3 weeks 3 days 1 hour ago) and read 4926 times:

Sorr the above story pertains to a flight during my instrument training.

JET


User currently offlineJt8djet From United States of America, joined Jul 2000, 214 posts, RR: 0
Reply 2, posted (13 years 10 months 3 weeks 3 days 1 hour ago) and read 4927 times:

"Did you remember to drain the wet spline?" I was asked before I pulled the CSD. "Uhhh...Yes" I responded.

Let's just say, I still have that T-shirt with the Exxon 2380 stain, to remind me, ALLWAYS drain the wet spline before you pull the CSD!


User currently offline37KEEPER From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 3, posted (13 years 10 months 3 weeks 3 days ago) and read 4906 times:

SO I'M OUT ON THE GATE AND FIND A BRAKE OUT OF LIMITS ON AN L-1011. I FIND A FRIEND AT WORK TO COME OUT AND CHANGE IT WITH ME AND WE ARE REALLY KICKING THIS THINGS A--. WE'RE FINALLY READY TO SLIDE IT OFF THE AXLE AND I TURN TO HIM AND ASK DID YA BLEED EM. HERE'S THE KEY MOMENT --I THINK I HEAR HIM SAY YES. SO I GO TO TAKE OFF THE BOLTS AT THE DISCONNECT, GET EM' OFF BUT THE DISCONNECT WON'T BUDGE. SO WHAT DO WE DO. WE GO AND GET A BIG BERTHA SCREWDRIVER AND GO PRY IT OFF. WITH BOTH OF US LEANING OVER THE BRAKE WE PRY AT IT. IT CAME LOOSE ALRIGHT. BLEW MY GLASSES ACROSS THE RAMP. SKYDROL EVERYWHERE INCLUDING BOTH OUR EYES. ALL WE COULD DO WAS CALL OUT TO THE OTHER AND HEAD TOWARD THE OFFICE WHERE WE FELL IN THE DOOR SCREAMING LIKE HELL FOR SOMEONE TO HELP US. ONLY REPLY WAS LAUGHTER AND RIDICULE. WHICH WE DEFINITELY DESERVED. BIG TIME BRAIN FADE!

User currently offlineIainhol From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 4, posted (13 years 10 months 3 weeks 3 days ago) and read 4904 times:

Well mine would be when I was climbing out of SNA in a 172RG and my red gear light (the 172RG only has one gear indicator light) did not come on. So what we are taught to do is unscrew them both and put the working one in the inop ones and see if it works. So I do this and it all works fine, so I put them in there correct places, in screwing in the green flight I did not realise it had a dimmer on it. Well on downwind ready to land after my joyride, put my gear down it goes down I can see it beside me but the light does not go one does not go on!
I did a low fly by and got ATC to check my gear and they said it appeared to be down, so on my next time around I made sure on final I would go full flaps and manifold pressuer below 13 inches as if it was not down and locked my gear warning system would go off and I would have to go around and use the pump. Well it did not go off I landed safely taxied back to parking tied it down and got out my phone to call my buddy who was also a flight instructor at the school.
Well I told him the story and he said 'Um Iain, turn the master on, and turn the gear indicator light counter clockwise, what do you see?' Needless to say I felt really dumb!!!
Iain


User currently offlineWEAPON From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 5, posted (13 years 10 months 3 weeks 2 days 22 hours ago) and read 4868 times:

tales from the ramp:
Learning to push back airplanes, one particular evening, i was pushing back with my ramp lead. I had it going straight, too far. So when I went to turn the a/c, it had gone to far over the line on the ramp. And passing right behind the plane i was pushing was a DAL 767. I almost drove it right into it. Luckily, I stopped it.
WEAPON


User currently offlineCargyvr From Canada, joined Jul 2006, 0 posts, RR: 0
Reply 6, posted (13 years 10 months 3 weeks 2 days 20 hours ago) and read 4849 times:

Dumbest thing i've done when I was little, while during a flight when I visited the flight deck, the captian asked me "So do you want to become a Pilot when you grow up son?" And I replied "No I want to do something exciting."

DOH.. haha


User currently offlineRunway From United States of America, joined Jun 2005, 0 posts, RR: 0
Reply 7, posted (13 years 10 months 3 weeks 2 days 20 hours ago) and read 4836 times:

I was doing circuits in Halifax one day, one busy day. The traffic was such that tower was extending my downwind legs 7-8 miles. I told them that I'd like to stay in closer to the field and that a 360 would be better than a huge downwind. So after an hour of touch'n go's and about 20 360's I came in for a full stop on 33. After I landed I shot past Bravo, the exit I had planned to use, I got on the radio right away and asked for a 360 back to Bravo. Tower came on and said " I'll give you a 360 if you want, but a 180 may work better for Bravo."

That was the stupidest thing I've ever said on the radio, not the stupidest thing I've done, so we'll leave it at that.

Runway


User currently offlineUSAFHummer From United States of America, joined May 2000, 10685 posts, RR: 52
Reply 8, posted (13 years 10 months 3 weeks 2 days 19 hours ago) and read 4829 times:

When I was 8 years old I was on a United flight SFO-SAN and the routing was directly over the Sierra Nevadas, and so being the mountain buff that I was (and still am) I asked the captain before the flight if he could announce when we could see Mount Whitney (the highest in the lower 48 + Hawaii). Well, needless to say he did that and I looked down and of course I couldn't pick it out through the windows, it was a sea of white down there-looking back at the incident, I feel really stupid about it cause how was the pilot gonna know that we flew over Mt Whitney and not some other mountain??

I also got airsick once and had to number 2 it at least 8 times during the transcon flight PHL-SAN, I think.

Greg



Chief A.net college football stadium self-pic guru
User currently offlineAtrpilot From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 9, posted (13 years 10 months 3 weeks 2 days 19 hours ago) and read 4832 times:

Hmmm I've done so many dumb ass things its hard to pick out just one!

Here's a tale from my private pilot days. I was going out for a pleasure flight one day, feeling invincible because I had 100 hours in my logbook... so experienced! Anyway, a student buddy of mine asked if he could come along and sit in the left seat to fly a little once we were in the air. I said "Sure!" How hard could it be to fly from the other seat? that was my first life threatening error of the day.

As I preflighted the old Cessna 172B, the airport's mechanic asked me if I could run a part over to a neighboring field, just a six minute flight away. I said "no problem!" As we taxied to the end of the 2500' by 30' wide strip, I looked at the sky and noted that to the northwest, the sky seemed a little on the dark side. No matter, I thought. Six minutes there and six back, what could possibly go wrong? I never thought to get a weather briefing for such a short flight (second life threatening error). With no worries, I took off into the hazy sky (third life threatening error).

The flight to the neighboring airfield went smoothly, aside from the darkening skies to the northwest and the haze which lowered the prevailing visibility to around 4 miles. With the other fella in the left seat and at the controls, we played around a little and then I retook the controls for the landing. I had some difficulty, as my hands didn't seem to share my view that right seat flying should be an easy transition for an "experienced" hundred hour pilot.

As we lined up on the runway for the return to the aircraft's home base, I became increasingly concerned with the darkening skies. Instead of going back to the ramp and calling flight service to get a better handle on the situation, I actually said to my trusting passenger "we better hurry, I think there is weather coming!" And thus I made the fourth in the series of life endangering errors that day.

By the time we reached the field just six minutes later the view outside the aircraft had become vastly different. The sky was purple, rain showers that where impossible to see through where touching the northern field boundery and the trees below were bend in seemingly impossible directions by the wildly shifting gust front winds. And thus, I made what should been the last mistake of the day, indeed of my entire life. I didn't run south. I lined up and attempted the landing on the 35' wide runway. From the right seat.

Believe it or not, I didn't crash, although we very nearly wrecked the airplane trying to get it to a tie down spot. I don't know what the wind speed was on landing, but it took six rather large men to hold the aircraft on the ground as we tied it down. Why did I commit all of these errors? Pride mostly. Ego, stupidity and ignorence of the fact that haze can very effectivley hide the presence of convective weather at low altitudes also played a role. I learned allot though. I learned that there is no subtitute for careful preflight planning, even for the shortest flight. I learned that you never shoud try something for the first time without a qualified CFI sitting in the other seat. But most of all, I learned that I should always listen to that little voice inside my head that was quietly telling me the whole time that something wasn't right.

These are lessons that I still take with me every time I get on the flight deck of an airliner all these years later. Hope y'all enjoyed it, and sorry about the length!



User currently offlineAAR90 From United States of America, joined Jan 2000, 3494 posts, RR: 46
Reply 10, posted (13 years 10 months 3 weeks 2 days 17 hours ago) and read 4826 times:

Bunches of them. All involving "boats," "hooks" and PO'd Capt's.  Crying  Nuts


*NO CARRIER* -- A Naval Aviator's worst nightmare!
User currently offlineBuff From Australia, joined Mar 2007, 0 posts, RR: 1
Reply 11, posted (13 years 10 months 3 weeks 2 days 17 hours ago) and read 4822 times:

Preflighting a Dash 8 many moons past just after getting my endorsement, I noticed a strange fluid present on the belly near the tail. Usual practice was to run a finger through it, see if it was oily, take a sniff, maybe even a taste.

Got back to the flight deck, reported strange blue fluid to Skipper, jokingly stated "It doesn't taste like sh*t..."

What did I learn from that?

Few years later, same kind of thing - strange fluid leaking from landing gear area. Out came the finger, oily feel but no whiff of Jet fuel, got most of liquid off finger then touched it to the end of my tongue.

As my throat constricted and threatened to cut off oxygen to my increasingly shrinking mind, the engineer present said it was the first time he'd seen a pilot drink skydrol, once he picked himself up off the ground from laughing so hard.

Hmmmf...

Buff


User currently offlineAtrpilot From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 12, posted (13 years 10 months 3 weeks 2 days 17 hours ago) and read 4809 times:

Buff...

I think licking the skydrol is a right of passage for Dash 8 drivers! Only I was trying to decide if mine was coming from the rudder actuators or was residual deice fluid.

...It was skydrol, alright!


User currently offlineBuff From Australia, joined Mar 2007, 0 posts, RR: 1
Reply 13, posted (13 years 10 months 3 weeks 2 days 7 hours ago) and read 4774 times:

Better clarify that Blue Fluid: It was from the forward lavatory...

Yewwww,

Buff


User currently offlineAtrpilot From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 14, posted (13 years 10 months 3 weeks 2 days 5 hours ago) and read 4761 times:

YYYYEEEEEWWWWWW!!!!!

No, it was all over the back of the airplane near the access door for the FDR and CVR. It was skydrol... a #1 rudder actuator leak.


User currently offlineUAL Bagsmasher From United States of America, joined Sep 1999, 2148 posts, RR: 10
Reply 15, posted (13 years 10 months 3 weeks 2 days 4 hours ago) and read 4749 times:

I was bending over to pick up a bag that fell off the beltloader in the front pit of a B732. The hood of my jacket started being "eaten" by the A/C pack intake. It damn near picked me up from the ground. Boy that thing is strong! Smile

User currently offlineLeigh Pilgrim From United Kingdom, joined Dec 2000, 392 posts, RR: 0
Reply 16, posted (13 years 10 months 3 weeks 2 days 3 hours ago) and read 4730 times:

Fly with Airtours!, the landings were so dodgy!!!

User currently offlineVC-10 From United Kingdom, joined Oct 1999, 3708 posts, RR: 34
Reply 17, posted (13 years 10 months 3 weeks 1 day 23 hours ago) and read 4701 times:
Support Airliners.net - become a First Class Member!

37KEEPER
Skydrol in the eyes and you walked to the office ?????? In my experience if you have eyes full of Skydrol you have to be led to the office by someone who can see. As for laughter & ridicule, I wouldn't like to work where that happened. When I worked on the ramp everyone tried to help you in such circumstances.


User currently offlineIainhol From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 18, posted (13 years 10 months 3 weeks 1 day 23 hours ago) and read 4697 times:

What is Skydrol??
Iain


User currently offlineTom775257 From United Kingdom, joined Dec 2000, 153 posts, RR: 0
Reply 19, posted (13 years 10 months 3 weeks 1 day 23 hours ago) and read 4697 times:

hydraulic fluid

User currently offlineN-156F From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 20, posted (13 years 10 months 3 weeks 1 day 22 hours ago) and read 4704 times:

Well, the only time I've been in the cockpit of a plane in the air was when I was in the front seat of a C172 with my uncle. I only had the controls for three minutes or so, but no dumb moves.
Perhaps the dumbest thing was right after the Valujet crash (before I knew anything about aviation), when flying home from ATL-JAX on a DC-9-30 in a window seat where the engine was readily visible, I turned around and saw the inlet guide vane. Thinking that was the fan itself, I exclaimed (more than just a bit scared, and perhaps louder than I should have), "The engine's off!" It was funny to watch as passengers had the color drain from their faces and collect at their feet, but the F/As had to come on and explain that the engine was on, and then the captain came on and lectured everyone on how a JT8D worked. Damn, I felt dumb. Embarrassment
My sister did the same thing two days after I did, when she was coming back with our mother after I went back on my own.


User currently offlinePilot1113 From United States of America, joined Aug 1999, 2333 posts, RR: 11
Reply 21, posted (13 years 10 months 3 weeks 1 day 20 hours ago) and read 4674 times:

Oh yeah...

Minus the things that I've said on these boards, that leaves-- oh... about 1.5 million other things.

One sticks out.. my flight to Midway. I thought, what the hell... I've been to Providence and landed parallel to a 737 so it shouldn't be much a problem at Midway.

Just in case, I took my friend (you all know him as PurdueArrow) who's a CFI. That turned out to be my last smart thing I did that day.

We had to come in behind a ATA 727 and I was in a Warrior. I think we had to keep our speed up to cruising speed until just over the runway. That landing was one of the most wildest landings that I've ever done! I'm surprised that we didn't break the airplane.

I'm never doing that again! I, too, thought I was 'experienced' at 200 hours. WOAH! Was I wrong! Now, I'm sticking to small Cs, Ds, and E airports.

I guess that if you haven't made any mistakes than I wouldn't want to fly with you. Everyone that I know has a "stupid flight" story. It's a humbling experience that all that lectures can't buy.

- Neil Harrison


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