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Aircraft Tire Trivia Question!  
User currently offlineMarc Kobaissi From United States of America, joined Mar 2001, 119 posts, RR: 0
Posted (10 years 5 months 1 week 5 days 4 hours ago) and read 4528 times:



Can you name two aircraft that have chines on their REAR tires?


-Marc K





24 replies: All unread, jump to last
 
User currently offlineDC-10Tech From United States of America, joined Jun 2001, 298 posts, RR: 2
Reply 1, posted (10 years 5 months 1 week 4 days 22 hours ago) and read 4312 times:

Whoah, good question, let me think about that one.


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User currently offlinePilotpip From United States of America, joined Sep 2003, 3150 posts, RR: 10
Reply 2, posted (10 years 5 months 1 week 4 days 21 hours ago) and read 4303 times:

For those of us out there who aren't aware of what chines are, can we get an explanation? Or does that give the trivia question away?  Smile


DMI
User currently offlineLiamksa From Australia, joined Oct 2001, 308 posts, RR: 0
Reply 3, posted (10 years 5 months 1 week 4 days 19 hours ago) and read 4284 times:

Pilotpip,

Chined tyres are used on aircraft with aft-mounted engines to limit the amount of water kicked up off the nosewheel and then ingested by the engines when taking off from a runway with a lot of standing water.

As for which aircraft with chined tyres on the mains -  Confused

Edit: Is it a bizjet maybe Marc?

[Edited 2004-04-13 10:20:14]

User currently offlineDC-10Tech From United States of America, joined Jun 2001, 298 posts, RR: 2
Reply 4, posted (10 years 5 months 1 week 4 days 19 hours ago) and read 4278 times:

I'm stumped. It would have to be an aircraft who's rear tires could kick water into the engines, but I'm drawing a blank as to what that might be!


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User currently offlineAUAE From United States of America, joined Apr 2004, 296 posts, RR: 3
Reply 5, posted (10 years 5 months 1 week 4 days 11 hours ago) and read 4194 times:

I will guess maybe it is aircraft with rear facing props. So I will guess the Piaggio (sp?) and the Beech Starship.




Air transport is just a glorified bus operation. -Michael O'Leary, Ryanair's chief executive
User currently offlineAir1727 From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 6, posted (10 years 5 months 1 week 3 days 22 hours ago) and read 4096 times:

What a cool trivia question...

Single and dual-"Chine" tires are usually only on the nose gear. Never seen them on mains...

Looking forward to the answer...


User currently offlineTechrep From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 7, posted (10 years 5 months 1 week 3 days 18 hours ago) and read 4073 times:

"Chines" must be some kind of slang word because they are called Rib deflectors. Goodyear doesn't make a DT or Deflector Type tire for any aircraft main tire, commercial, GA or business.

My guess it will be some oddball special application aircraft, like the Concorde and it's ilk. Im sure the Russians would use something odd like that too.

TechRep


User currently offlineSaintsman From United Kingdom, joined Mar 2002, 2065 posts, RR: 2
Reply 8, posted (10 years 5 months 1 week 3 days 8 hours ago) and read 4022 times:

This is probably not what Mark K was looking for but interesting never the less.

http://www.sensorsmag.com/articles/0300/14/main.shtml

It's about an experiment to spin the tyres before landing.


User currently offlineGalaxy5 From United States of America, joined Mar 2000, 2034 posts, RR: 24
Reply 9, posted (10 years 5 months 1 week 3 days 7 hours ago) and read 4008 times:

727, 737s i think have chines, I think alot of the russian airlines have chines if i recall.


"damn, I didnt know prince could Ball like that" - Charlie Murphy
User currently offlineN685FE From United States of America, joined Dec 2003, 451 posts, RR: 11
Reply 10, posted (10 years 5 months 1 week 3 days 5 hours ago) and read 3980 times:

.........................................................................................................727 MD80.......................................


psp. lead by example
User currently offlineAir1727 From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 11, posted (10 years 5 months 1 week 2 days 22 hours ago) and read 3948 times:

Chined Tires is not slang at all; rib deflector is actually the "alternative" term for it since Chine can be confused with the fairing application along wing root leading and/or trailing edges. Chines are usually only found on nose gear tires; so when the mains came up, I was surprised...

Goodyear does not; but Michelin does...


User currently offlineMr Spaceman From Canada, joined Mar 2001, 2787 posts, RR: 9
Reply 12, posted (10 years 5 months 1 week 2 days 8 hours ago) and read 3917 times:

Hi guys.

I think the key word in this question is the one that Marc typed in large bold letters ........ REAR ......... which to me dosen't nessesarily mean the "main" tires.

Perhaps the two aircraft are taildraggers with chines on their "rear" tailwheel.

Are there any taildraggers that use chined tailwheels to help prevent the spray of water, mud, slush, etc, from flying up into the hingeline of the elevator such as a DC-3? Just a thought. Big grin

I believe you can see the chine on the one nosegear tire on this Fokker 70.


View Large View Medium
Click here for bigger photo!

Photo © Jacek Zlotnicki [epwa_spotters]




Chris  Smile




"Just a minute while I re-invent myself"
User currently offlineJetmek319 From Germany, joined Sep 2003, 199 posts, RR: 1
Reply 13, posted (10 years 5 months 1 week 2 days 8 hours ago) and read 3912 times:

I seem to remeber that the B727 has chines, or rib deflector if you choose. Been a while since I bent tin on a 727!


Never, ever moon a werewolf !!
User currently offlineMr Spaceman From Canada, joined Mar 2001, 2787 posts, RR: 9
Reply 14, posted (10 years 5 months 1 week 2 days 7 hours ago) and read 3902 times:

Hi guys.

After looking at hundreds of photos of DC-3's I couldn't find any really good close up shots of the tailwheel and elevator. However, this photo shows what I meant by a chined tailwheel helping to prevent the DC-3's elevator hinges from getting sprayed with dirt, etc during takeoff & landing.

I don't think chined tires were being used back in the 1940's on aircraft like the DC-3, but, it's just a crazy idea to try to find an answer to what might be a trick question.


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Photo © Thomas Andre Hjelmen



Like I said, a REAR tire doesn't nessesarily mean a MAIN tire. Big grin


Chris  Smile



"Just a minute while I re-invent myself"
User currently offlineAir1727 From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 15, posted (10 years 5 months 1 week 2 days 7 hours ago) and read 3893 times:

Good points Chris; but having worked on DC-3s several times in the past, and last year a couple of times, none of the tail wheels had ribs/chines. Still clueless on my end...  Big grin

User currently offlineAUAE From United States of America, joined Apr 2004, 296 posts, RR: 3
Reply 16, posted (10 years 5 months 1 week 2 days 7 hours ago) and read 3893 times:

Good line of thinking Mr. Spaceman....

But I sure can't think of a chined tail wheel. Seems as though most I have ever seen were pretty flat. Not sure if a tail would really need a "chined" tire.



Air transport is just a glorified bus operation. -Michael O'Leary, Ryanair's chief executive
User currently offlineMr Spaceman From Canada, joined Mar 2001, 2787 posts, RR: 9
Reply 17, posted (10 years 5 months 1 week 2 days 6 hours ago) and read 3887 times:

Hi guys.

Well, because Marc hasn't come up with the answer yet, I figured I'd stretch my mind backwards & sideways a bit to see what obscure thoughts would show up and that's what I got  Laugh out loud ........... based on the word REAR tire.

I'm sure the answer will make a lot of us think "Geese, why didn't I think of that!" Or the correct answers have already been mentioned.


Chris  Smile




"Just a minute while I re-invent myself"
User currently offlineTWAMD-80 From United States of America, joined Oct 2001, 1006 posts, RR: 4
Reply 18, posted (10 years 5 months 1 week 2 days 3 hours ago) and read 3854 times:

I'd have to go for the good old MD-80 as well as the 717.

TW



Two A-4's, left ten o'clock level continue left turn!
User currently offlinePhollingsworth From United Kingdom, joined Mar 2004, 825 posts, RR: 5
Reply 19, posted (10 years 5 months 1 week 2 days 2 hours ago) and read 3853 times:

I'd have to go for the good old MD-80 as well as the 717.

TW:

While you could put them on the MD-80 series, they typically have deflectors on both the nose and main gear to remove the need to chined tires. This can be seen if you look close at the photo below.

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Click here for bigger photo!

Photo © Ricardo Morales Aviation Photography of Mexico



Pete


User currently offlineAUAE From United States of America, joined Apr 2004, 296 posts, RR: 3
Reply 20, posted (10 years 5 months 1 week 5 hours ago) and read 3757 times:

Marc!!!!

Whats the answer??



Air transport is just a glorified bus operation. -Michael O'Leary, Ryanair's chief executive
User currently offlinePilotpip From United States of America, joined Sep 2003, 3150 posts, RR: 10
Reply 21, posted (10 years 5 months 1 week 5 hours ago) and read 3754 times:

The 727-200 on my ramp right now has deflectors, so I can dispell one idea(at least for this specific case)


WE WANT ANSWERS MARC!!!!



DMI
User currently offlineConcord977 From United States of America, joined Jan 2004, 1261 posts, RR: 25
Reply 22, posted (10 years 5 months 6 days 21 hours ago) and read 3710 times:

DC-9 / MD80 group

727-100 / 727-200

SR-71 (not sure why)


Am I close?




No info
User currently offlineSaintsman From United Kingdom, joined Mar 2002, 2065 posts, RR: 2
Reply 23, posted (10 years 4 months 3 weeks 6 days 13 hours ago) and read 3525 times:

Marc. We're still waiting.

User currently offlineSlamClick From United States of America, joined Nov 2003, 10062 posts, RR: 68
Reply 24, posted (10 years 4 months 3 weeks 6 days 13 hours ago) and read 3531 times:

Okay Marc, the way trivia works is that the person asking the question actually knows the answer. They may even post it.

No guess as to type, but inclined to think it is something with pusher props.




Happiness is not seeing another trite Ste. Maarten photo all week long.
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