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Help: How Do The Pilots Steer A Jet On The Ground?  
User currently offlineLuxair From Suriname, joined Jan 2001, 848 posts, RR: 2
Posted (13 years 6 months 3 weeks 3 days 4 hours ago) and read 12840 times:

I always asked myself how are the pilots steering a jet on the ground during taxiing, with the pedals or
with a steeringwheel? I saw on a picture, it was an Airbus A320-200, that on the Captain's left side there was a wheel next to the stick and I was asking myself if maybe with that little wheel they can steer the AC on the ground? Can someone help me on this topic? Thank you in advance


Marvin Lee Cooper
12 replies: All unread, jump to last
 
User currently offlineChopper From United Kingdom, joined Aug 2005, 0 posts, RR: 0
Reply 1, posted (13 years 6 months 3 weeks 3 days 4 hours ago) and read 12790 times:

I dont fly big jets. they have a control that turns the front wheel when on the ground

User currently offlineNicolaki From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 2, posted (13 years 6 months 3 weeks 3 days 3 hours ago) and read 12771 times:

With the tiller

User currently offlineN622AS From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 3, posted (13 years 6 months 3 weeks 3 days 3 hours ago) and read 12767 times:

I'am a mechanic not a pilot, but I'am taxi qualified on MD80 and 737-400/700. The small steering wheel (tiller) you saaw in the picture is used to steer the a/c on the ground by turning the nose wheels.

User currently offlineLubicon From Canada, joined Oct 2000, 197 posts, RR: 0
Reply 4, posted (13 years 6 months 3 weeks 3 days 1 hour ago) and read 12752 times:

During takeoff, the rudder pedals are used to keep the aircraft aligned on the runway once sufficient speed is reached. I know this is obviously different than taxiing but technically the plane is still on the ground.

User currently offlineIndianGuy From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 5, posted (13 years 6 months 3 weeks 2 days 23 hours ago) and read 12731 times:

I also heard that on some planes, differential braking canbe used to steer the aircraft.

For some turns this alone is sufficient. But for sharper turns this method is used along with the tiller.

Sometimes airlines restrict the angle to which the tiller can be rotated (dunno why. this is just what i heard). And in such cases the braking mehtod is used along with the tiller.


User currently offlineNKP S2 From United States of America, joined Dec 1999, 1714 posts, RR: 5
Reply 6, posted (13 years 6 months 3 weeks 2 days 22 hours ago) and read 12716 times:

Hydraulic power is used as the "muscle" for nosewheel steering, with commanded inputs from the tiller or rudder pedals either mechanicaly ( cable ) or "by wire". The linking/mixing of the tiller/rudder controls to the hydraulic metering valve ( which ports pressure to either left or right actuators ) is such that they input with different ratios: Ballpark figures here as A/C differ;...Full tiller input will usually steer the nosewheel approx 78 degrees from the centerline -OR- Full rudder input will move the nosewheels somewhere around 7 to 8 degrees from centerline. Differential braking is generally only used on large commercial A/C when making a very tight turn.

User currently offlineJETPILOT From United States of America, joined May 1999, 3130 posts, RR: 29
Reply 7, posted (13 years 6 months 3 weeks 2 days 22 hours ago) and read 12722 times:

Differential braking to tighten a turn is never used in a transport aircraft as tire scrubbing would quickly flatspot the tires on the inside bogey.

A combination of tiller and rudder pedal steering is used to turn a plane. The rudder pedals only have a seven degree from center operating range in the 727. Any turn requiring more than 7 degrees either side of center needs to be done with the tiller. The tiller is usually reserved for larger turns.

The tiller is very sensitive so small corrections like trying to maintain centerline of a taxiway or a runway are made much smoother with the rudder pedals.

On the Airbus 320,330,340 there are two tillers, one for the captain and one for the FO. These are the only planes I know of with two tillers.

The DC8 has a castering bogey which allows the rear of the inside bogey to unlock in tight turns to reduce tire scrubbing. The inside bogey unlocks when the tiller is turned more than 30 degrees either side of center. Hydraulic locks lock the bogey when the tiller is with in the 30 degree range and the bogey has centered.

JET


User currently offlineFDXmech From United States of America, joined Mar 2000, 3251 posts, RR: 34
Reply 8, posted (13 years 6 months 3 weeks 2 days 21 hours ago) and read 12709 times:

In the FDX A300/310 flight manual. 180deg turns off the runway with wet or slippery conditions warrant the use of asymmetric thrust and differential braking.


You're only as good as your last departure.
User currently offlineJETPILOT From United States of America, joined May 1999, 3130 posts, RR: 29
Reply 9, posted (13 years 6 months 3 weeks 2 days 21 hours ago) and read 12710 times:

I guess tire scrubbing wouldn't be a problem then if the runway were wet or slick.

I was adressing normal operations.

JET


User currently offlineNKP S2 From United States of America, joined Dec 1999, 1714 posts, RR: 5
Reply 10, posted (13 years 6 months 3 weeks 2 days 20 hours ago) and read 12700 times:

Differential braking is avoided in bogey equipped MLGs, but it can be used with non-bogey equipped gear...provided that the A/C is allowed to roll straight forward approximately a tire circumfrence to unload the strut ( per our procedures )...if the A/C is being parked. No other way to get a 737 to turn around in a space 1.5 times the wingspan of the plane--although it is recognized it wears the tires more and is only done when needed...along with a bit of added thrust on the engine opposite the turn axis.

User currently offlineLuxair From Suriname, joined Jan 2001, 848 posts, RR: 2
Reply 11, posted (13 years 6 months 3 weeks 2 days 20 hours ago) and read 12693 times:

Thanks a lot for your helpfull answers. This
makes it really clear for me.

Marc S.



Marvin Lee Cooper
User currently offlineFLY 8 From Austria, joined Dec 2000, 329 posts, RR: 0
Reply 12, posted (13 years 6 months 3 weeks 2 days 10 hours ago) and read 12661 times:

The Fokker F-50 also has one tiller on the captains side and one on the copilots!


yes i can handle that alone. - - -famous last words
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