Sponsor Message:
Aviation Technical / Operations Forum
My Starred Topics | Profile | New Topic | Forum Index | Help | Search 
What Does The Term "heavy" Mean?  
User currently offlineNwaflyer From United States of America, joined Apr 2004, 130 posts, RR: 0
Posted (10 years 1 month 1 week 5 days 1 hour ago) and read 27702 times:

I seen and heard the word "heavy" used. What determines that an aircraft is "heavy"?



7 replies: All unread, jump to last
 
User currently offlineMD11LuxuryLinr From United States of America, joined Jul 2003, 1385 posts, RR: 14
Reply 1, posted (10 years 1 month 1 week 5 days 1 hour ago) and read 27701 times:

Ha.. if it weighs over 250,000 pounds.. loaded..


Caution wake turbulence, you are following a heavy jet.
User currently offlineRockyRacoon From United States of America, joined Oct 2003, 962 posts, RR: 0
Reply 2, posted (10 years 1 month 1 week 5 days 1 hour ago) and read 27679 times:

Heavy planes require larger spacing in airspace traffic patterns. THey're wake turbulance can really toss the smaller airliners around. Exception to the rule is the 752, sometimes it gets treated like a "heavy" due to it's strong wake turbulance, even though it is >250,00 lbs (some weigh 250+ ie: TZ).



peace


User currently offlineConcordeBoy From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 3, posted (10 years 1 month 1 week 5 days 1 hour ago) and read 27659 times:

actually, it has to weigh over 255,000lbs

User currently offlineMD11LuxuryLinr From United States of America, joined Jul 2003, 1385 posts, RR: 14
Reply 4, posted (10 years 1 month 1 week 5 days ago) and read 27628 times:

~" Exception to the rule is the 752, sometimes it gets treated like a "heavy" due to it's strong wake turbulence"~

Assuming you mean that all aircraft flying behind it are a minimum of 5 miles (IIRC) away because of wake turbulence, then yes. All 757s are treated that way.

As far as being 'heavy jets', for airlines like AA, UA, US, etc., the 752 is not.



Caution wake turbulence, you are following a heavy jet.
User currently offlineBrick From United States of America, joined Aug 1999, 1579 posts, RR: 7
Reply 5, posted (10 years 1 month 1 week 4 days 22 hours ago) and read 27560 times:

I have heard 752's be referred to as heavy just a few times in all of my years listening to ATC on United Airlines. The 753's are almost always referred to as heavys.

Mark



A noble spirit embiggens the smallest man...
User currently offlineCalpilot From United States of America, joined Oct 1999, 998 posts, RR: 14
Reply 6, posted (10 years 1 month 1 week 4 days 20 hours ago) and read 27530 times:

MGTOW has to 255,000lbs. Not actual weight.

User currently offlineWilco737 From Greenland, joined Jun 2004, 8968 posts, RR: 76
Reply 7, posted (10 years 1 month 1 week 3 days 4 hours ago) and read 27409 times:
AIRLINERS.NET CREW
HEAD MODERATOR

Hi you guys,

all of your posts were correct, but the "heavy" is just the wake turbulence category, which results of the weight!

There is light, medium and heavy. It is important for separation between the aircrafts. A 737 needs to be separated of a minimum of 2 minutes behind a heavy. Otherwise it can encounter these severe wake turbulence, which can bring you in unusual attitudes!! Like we saw on the AA 300 in NY! The encountered wake turbulence of e preceding 747 and we know what happened.

The B752 is also heavy, although its weight is not above the limit for the wake turbulence category, but the 752 has short wings and these short wings need to produce a lot of lift! And with this lift the wake turbulence are even worse! So a 752 is heavy!

In ATC Communication they use the word HEAVY to make sure, that there is sufficient separation between the aircrafts...

WILCO737



It it's not Boeing, I am not going.
Top Of Page
Forum Index

Reply To This Topic What Does The Term "heavy" Mean?
Username:
No username? Sign up now!
Password: 


Forgot Password? Be reminded.
Remember me on this computer (uses cookies)
  • Tech/Ops related posts only!
  • Not Tech/Ops related? Use the other forums
  • No adverts of any kind. This includes web pages.
  • No hostile language or criticizing of others.
  • Do not post copyright protected material.
  • Use relevant and describing topics.
  • Check if your post already been discussed.
  • Check your spelling!
  • DETAILED RULES
Add Images Add SmiliesPosting Help

Please check your spelling (press "Check Spelling" above)


Similar topics:More similar topics...
What Does The Term Furlowed Mean posted Fri Oct 18 2002 05:41:04 by AIRNZsaab340
What Does The Personal Suffix "A.A.E." Mean? posted Wed Dec 1 2004 04:34:35 by Corey07850
What Is The Function Of "prop Sync"? posted Thu Aug 25 2005 22:48:17 by ArniePie
What Does The Yellow Mean? posted Fri Sep 13 2002 09:03:02 by David B.
What Does The Yelloe Mean posted Wed Mar 27 2002 05:28:16 by David B.
What Does The Squigglely Thing In The Engine Do? posted Sat Apr 8 2006 04:19:14 by Tony Lu
What Does The Can Of Coke Really Cost? posted Thu Sep 2 2004 18:06:59 by Captoveur
What Does The Flight Engineer Do? posted Fri Jun 22 2001 00:37:51 by CYKA
What Does The Nav Function On The AP Do? posted Tue Oct 24 2000 00:17:36 by TWA717_200
What Does "Transition Altittude" Mean? posted Tue May 2 2006 17:29:21 by AirPacific747
What Does The Can Of Coke Really Cost? posted Thu Sep 2 2004 18:06:59 by Captoveur
What Does The Flight Engineer Do? posted Fri Jun 22 2001 00:37:51 by CYKA
What Does The Nav Function On The AP Do? posted Tue Oct 24 2000 00:17:36 by TWA717_200
What Does "flying By The Seat Of Your Pants" Mean? posted Sat Sep 1 2007 07:36:36 by Lehpron

Sponsor Message:
Printer friendly format