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Pilots - Base Versus Where You Live  
User currently offlineN62NA From United States of America, joined Aug 2003, 4474 posts, RR: 7
Posted (10 years 3 months 1 week 10 hours ago) and read 4340 times:

Here in MIA, AA has a major hub (as you all probably know!).

I'm sure not all AA pilots actually live in the Miami area, though. I would be interested in seeing replies of where pilots live versus where their base airport is (and don't restrict this to AA and the Miami hub - it would be interesting to hear from pilots all over the world).

Also, if you do not live in the area of your base, do you maintain an apartment or second home in that city?

30 replies: All unread, showing first 25:
 
User currently offlineWilco737 From Greenland, joined Jun 2004, 9041 posts, RR: 76
Reply 1, posted (10 years 3 months 1 week 10 hours ago) and read 4292 times:
AIRLINERS.NET CREW
HEAD MODERATOR

Hi N62NA,

I am from Germany and I live next to the airport I am based. But in the next months I will move to another city, which is about 300 NM away from my base. For the operator it makes no difference! The only think, you have to take into account: be on time to your flight!!! So, take a plane, car or go by train!
You need another apartment or just a small room! When you land at midnight and take off again at 12 the next day, you cannot go home where you live! You need to stay at your airport where you fly! So, you can take a Hotel, too! Depends how expensive this is...

But it shouldn't be a problem to live somewhere else...

Always happy landings...

WILCO737



It it's not Boeing, I am not going.
User currently offlineBobnwa From United States of America, joined Dec 2000, 6477 posts, RR: 9
Reply 2, posted (10 years 3 months 1 week 8 hours ago) and read 4242 times:

Literally hundreds of pilots and flight attendants live in Florida and Arizona that are based in Atlanta, Dallas, Houston, Detroit, Minneapolis, Washington, Charlotte Boston,New York etc.

They commute back and forth to work, and many do share apartments at their base(called crash pads).

As Wilco737 stated, you have to on time for your flight!!!! No excuses.


User currently offlineF9Widebody From United States of America, joined Sep 2003, 1604 posts, RR: 10
Reply 3, posted (10 years 3 months 1 week 4 hours ago) and read 4207 times:

Well, I am not a pilot, but I flew from DFO back to DEN last week on F9 and three UA pilots were on the plane. I was talking to one and he said that all three of them were based in SFO but lived in DEN. They had just come in from PVG, ICN and KIX. He said it was their responsibility to get to from DEN to SFO before a trip, not the companies.

Regards



YES URLS in signature!!!
User currently offlineOkie From United States of America, joined Jul 2003, 3047 posts, RR: 3
Reply 4, posted (10 years 3 months 1 week 4 hours ago) and read 4194 times:

Many pilots along with other industries that have employees that travel officially residence in FL, TX, states that do not have state income taxes or other states with low income taxes. 7%-19% increase in disposable income, however most states seem to find a way with higher property or other taxes to make up some of that difference.

Okie


User currently offlineSSTjumbo From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 5, posted (10 years 3 months 1 week 4 hours ago) and read 4190 times:

Question, How do the pilots arrange for their flights back and forth from base to home and vice versa? Is it on the spot? Pre-arranged long before? Sounds stupid, but I'd be interested to know.

User currently offlineDl757md From United States of America, joined May 2004, 1562 posts, RR: 16
Reply 6, posted (10 years 3 months 1 week 3 hours ago) and read 4183 times:

They non rev as would any other airline employee. They list ahead of time and fly standby. It can be a challenge as they must assure that they get there in time to report for duty. This can result in some pretty creative routings and interesting interpretations of non rev policy. They can also request the jumpseat but must yield it to FAA inspectors, deadheading pilots, and pilots on company business among others.

Dl757md



757 Most beautiful airliner in the sky!
User currently offlineArmitageShanks From UK - England, joined Dec 2003, 3625 posts, RR: 15
Reply 7, posted (10 years 3 months 6 days 21 hours ago) and read 4125 times:

I live in TRI in eastern Tennessee and there are US, DL, and AA pilots that live here and deadhead to different locations.

User currently offlineFlykal From Australia, joined Sep 2003, 442 posts, RR: 3
Reply 8, posted (10 years 3 months 6 days 21 hours ago) and read 4130 times:

As for KE expat crews, we come from all over the globe and obviously scheduling can pose a nightmare for some 1900 + pilots.

Generally the plan is that you will work 20 days (within duty limitations, of course), and then get 10 days off per month to go back home, or wherever you choose. Schedules are done the 10th of each month for the following month and generally any extra leave requests need to be made a couple of months in advance and be approved by the relevant departments.

Within the 20 days / month on period, crews will usually fly around 60 hours, but this depends a lot on your aircraft type. 60 hours/month will usually equate to 3 or 4 long-haul flights (ICN-AB) (FRA / FRF / EDDF), Germany">FRA / LAX / JFK / AMS, etc etc etc), or a higher number of short hauls such as for the guys flying the 737-800/900.

As for flying back home and then back to the Seoul hub, all seats are confirmed (no-sub) as the airline needs to know that you will be back for your duty flight.

As for accommodation, all crew are provided with either an apartment or permanent 5* hotel room (depending on aircraft type and whether you are simply flying or also working in another department within the airline such as training, Human factors, etc etc).

Hope this gives you some insight into the deal, which overall, is not a bad one!

Cheers,
Phil



One doesn't discover new lands without consenting to lose sight of the shore for a very long time
User currently offlineHAL From United States of America, joined Jan 2002, 2561 posts, RR: 53
Reply 9, posted (10 years 3 months 6 days 20 hours ago) and read 4114 times:

It varies depending on how the job works. With my first airline - a commuter based in Pittsburgh - I commuted from home in Seattle. My second airline was Hawaiian, and I was based at home in SEA with only a 15 minute drive to the airport. That was heaven. Currently I'm working for a small commuter in Fairbanks Alaska and with a five-day-a-week schedule there's no way to get home to Seattle. I call the family a lot on the phone and see them maybe every couple of months. My new job starts next month with America West, and again I'll commute from Seattle, this time to Phoenix. Like my Pittsburgh job I'll have a 'crash pad' apartment shared with a number of other pilots. However with the kind of trips we fly, there won't be many in the apartment at any one time.

As for getting back and forth, some airlines allow unlimited passes on their airline as long as there is room (standby). As pilots, we're also allowed to 'jumpseat' in the cockpit of our own airline as long as there is room, or on other airlines if there is room in the main cabin. As others have said, it is up to us to get to work on time. That often means leaving the day before you start a trip to ensure you get there on time.

HAL



One smooth landing is skill. Two in a row is luck. Three in a row and someone is lying.
User currently offlineSonOfACaptain From United States of America, joined May 2004, 1747 posts, RR: 6
Reply 10, posted (10 years 3 months 5 days 19 hours ago) and read 4000 times:

Well my dad is based in PHL but lives in DFW. Long commute. Wasn't so bad when he was on mainline, but now that he is on express, he's home at max 5 nights a month. It's crazy. But I love what he is doing. He is working for my family so we can get on with our lives, even though he has lost EVERTHING, including his retirement. He is my sole inspiration in life and I love him to death. Oh, I just found out today that my dad has been flying for 15 years, not 13 like my profile says. Life is REALLY unfair, especially since he is a great, GREAT pilot.

-SOAC



Non Illegitimi Carborundum
User currently offlineN62NA From United States of America, joined Aug 2003, 4474 posts, RR: 7
Reply 11, posted (10 years 3 months 5 days 11 hours ago) and read 3954 times:

SOAC,

I have soooo much respect for your father! Best of luck to him!

N62NA


User currently offlineDeltaGuy From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 12, posted (10 years 3 months 5 days 9 hours ago) and read 3935 times:

Echoing what others said, there's a hellova lot of pilots down here in Florida....particularly in the Cocoa Beach area, there's quite a few Delta pilots, many of whom affectionately dubbed themselves "the surf dogs"...this was back when MCO was a DL Express hub and there were tons of junior Captains. Since then, MCO has been disbanded, and most went to NYC or ATL as 76ER F/O's, or down to the Mad Dog/737 right seat....so hence, quite a commute. Unless you live in a MAJOR hub city like ATL, and have some certainty as to your equipment, you're gonna have to commute sometime. Better off living where you prefer, and begging for that jumpseat.

To answer SST's question, commuting is done by jumpseating (to/from domicile and work), or by just simply using your non-rev ID to get a regular seat in the cabin. Sometimes it gets hairey though, especially on that last hop of the night...

SonofaCaptain, I feel the pain...my dad was NYC based for awhile, and we live down here...pain in the rear, lemme tell ya. ATL based is much better now.

DeltaGuy


User currently offlineInfiniti757 From United States of America, joined Jan 2004, 92 posts, RR: 0
Reply 13, posted (10 years 2 months 3 weeks 3 days 13 hours ago) and read 3737 times:

My significant other is an FA for a commuter, she has a thing called "commuter law" in her contract. It basically states that if she attempts to get on at least two flights to work and cannot get there it becomes the company's responsibility to get her to work. She says this is because of a base closure and the high number of commuters. They do not have as high a priority as their mainline counterparts when jump seating. Does anyone else have this type of experience as a commuter?


Give me the luxuries in life and I will gladly do without the necessities. (Frank Lloyd Wright)
User currently offlineSlamClick From United States of America, joined Nov 2003, 10062 posts, RR: 68
Reply 14, posted (10 years 2 months 3 weeks 3 days 12 hours ago) and read 3724 times:

Commuting; what does it entail?

Three time zones, two different airlines, and home and work being about 2340 miles apart.

Six or more hours on two airplanes and either a mad dash for the other gate or a two or three hour wait.

Sometimes going through security twice - already screened off one plane only to be screened again to get on the other. I believe that TSA gets compensated by the number of people screened, so they screen people twice wherever they can - screen people going from one sterile area to another.

Occasionally renting a car to drive seven hours because I cannot get on the shorter of the two legs.

On one occasion watching every departure for 24 hours leave without me. Each plane hit the gate and the agents went down and pulled off ALL the non-revs. The standby list hit a figure twice the seating capacity of the plane with people standing by for any seat to any destination in any direction - just out of HERE!

But it is all over in a couple of months.
Come on ice cream!



Happiness is not seeing another trite Ste. Maarten photo all week long.
User currently offline7574EVER From United States of America, joined Jan 2004, 478 posts, RR: 5
Reply 15, posted (10 years 2 months 3 weeks 3 days 3 hours ago) and read 3656 times:

But it is all over in a couple of months.

Do you know the date of your last flight yet?

[Edited 2004-07-03 00:48:56]


Right rudder....Right rudder...Come on, more right rudder....Right rudder......Aw forget it, I quit!!
User currently offlineSlamClick From United States of America, joined Nov 2003, 10062 posts, RR: 68
Reply 16, posted (10 years 2 months 3 weeks 3 days ago) and read 3621 times:

No. Not planning on a "retirement flight" with water arch and stuff. Just going away. I'ts been over for a while.

Might fly with a friend on his retirement flight at about the same time.




Happiness is not seeing another trite Ste. Maarten photo all week long.
User currently offlineNormalSpeed From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 17, posted (10 years 2 months 3 weeks 1 day 6 hours ago) and read 3453 times:

Hey, here's a wild and crazy idea: Why not just live where you are based out of? Is ORD or CVG or DET or CLE or DFW that horrible of a place? I mean, it's not like you are changing your domicile every other month, right?

'Speed


User currently offlineHAL From United States of America, joined Jan 2002, 2561 posts, RR: 53
Reply 18, posted (10 years 2 months 3 weeks 1 day 5 hours ago) and read 3445 times:

I mean, it's not like you are changing your domicile every other month, right?

Actually, it does happen. I spent a year flying for Chautauqua in 98-99. Just before I got there everyone was outstationed based - meaning the pilot domiciles were everwhere except the hubs of Pittsburgh, Indianapolis etc. Then they closed all those bases and based all the pilots out of PIT, IND, and BUF. Then after I left they started getting RJ's and began moving the domiciles around again to LGA, MCO, etc. If you moved every time your domicile moved, some of my firends at Chautauqua would have had to uproot their family about once a year for the last five years.

At Hawaiian when I was hired we had pilot bases in HNL, LAX, SFO, and SEA. Last year they closed LAX and SFO as domiciles. So things do change even at larger airlines. As a pilot you spend so much of your life flying around the country or world that many do like the stability of living in one place. Also, the ability for pilots to commute makes this possible. Not easy, but possible.

The other factor is that not all types of planes are based at all pilot domiciles. In the normal course of a career you start as a F/O in a smaller plane, then move to larger aircraft. Once you can get a Captains slot, you're back to the smaller planes to start, finally to end your career as captain on big planes. Each of these moves may (or may not) require being based at different airports. To a majority of pilots, the pain of commuting every few days is outweighed by the desire to have a stable family life in one location.

HAL



One smooth landing is skill. Two in a row is luck. Three in a row and someone is lying.
User currently offlineNormalSpeed From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 19, posted (10 years 2 months 3 weeks 1 day 1 hour ago) and read 3407 times:

"...some of my firends at Chautauqua would have had to uproot their family about once a year for the last five years."

Yeah, that's definitely no good. But I guess I'm just wondering how often that really happens.

'Speed


User currently offlineHAL From United States of America, joined Jan 2002, 2561 posts, RR: 53
Reply 20, posted (10 years 2 months 3 weeks 20 hours ago) and read 3367 times:

Normal Speed,

It depends on the airline. Some do move things around, some don't. Northwest closed its Seattle domicile and greatly reduced its Honolulu domicile in the last couple of years. Some of those pilots had been based there for decades. Did they move? Some did, some didn't. I guess it depends on how attached they were to living there.

Other airlines don't change much at all. Continental has had Houston, Cleveland, and Newark as pilot bases for just about forever. As plane types come and go, an airline may not close a base, but they may reduce the number of pilots at that base and shuffle the rest around.

Overall I'd say in a normal pilots career, it would be just about impossible to spend your entire career at one domicile, without facing the decision on whether or not to move. So then you make the decision whether or not to move based on you own personal needs. Family? Kids? Nice house? Nice town? It's always in individual decision whether to move, or to commute.

HAL



One smooth landing is skill. Two in a row is luck. Three in a row and someone is lying.
User currently offlineNormalSpeed From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 21, posted (10 years 2 months 3 weeks 14 hours ago) and read 3332 times:

HAL,

Thanks for sharing your perspective. You have been quite informative.

Now, I'm not saying that I want to move once a year or anything like that, but I've pretty much resigned myself to the fact that I will be doing some moving around if I want to be a pilot (in fact, I have already done some moving for that very purpose.)

'Speed


User currently offlineSlamClick From United States of America, joined Nov 2003, 10062 posts, RR: 68
Reply 22, posted (10 years 2 months 3 weeks 11 hours ago) and read 3310 times:

Would you take your kids out of school, ask your spouse to give up their job, sell your house and buy another, get a whole new circle of friends, find new doctor, dentist, church, forfeit memberships, spend maybe ten thousand unrecoverable dollars on moving expenses, etc. etc. etc. if the airline you worked for was in Chapter 11?

signed

Homeless in EWR



Happiness is not seeing another trite Ste. Maarten photo all week long.
User currently offlineAaron747 From Japan, joined Aug 2003, 8153 posts, RR: 26
Reply 23, posted (10 years 2 months 3 weeks 6 hours ago) and read 3248 times:

ORD or CVG or DET or CLE or DFW

Actually, I would only live in one of the above named places because yes, they're that bad.



If you need someone to blame / throw a rock in the air / you'll hit someone guilty
User currently offlineLowRider From United States of America, joined Jun 2004, 3220 posts, RR: 10
Reply 24, posted (10 years 2 months 3 weeks 2 hours ago) and read 3215 times:

As a former commuter turned resident of the base, I have seen it from both sides. Commuting can be a great way to live where you want, and work where you want (or have your cake and eat it too), but it does require certain sacrifices in terms of time off and money. You have to weigh that cost against the value of the money spent to move and establish yourself in a new location. I am hoping that eventually I will be able to get a good job in a city that I like. So far I have only been able to manage one or the other.


Proud OOTSK member
25 Scootertrash : AHHHH commuting... This thread brings back some nightmares, along with a few (VERY few) good memories. Currently I am living a 2.5 hour drive from my
26 VSFullThrottle : Hey guys I am not a pilot but I was speaking to one the other day, he told me that he has to fly to LGW/LHR from Cairo, Egypt. I find it kinda crazy,
27 JBirdAV8r : For the folks who commute off-line (airlines other than their own) things are not quite so easy, as they can't occupy the jumpseat, at least until TS
28 Scootertrash : JBirdAV8r: I have heard that there is soon to be a pilot program underway to re-introduce off line jumpseating. I believe it has something to do with
29 Post contains images Fly727 : Well I'm based out of Mexico City where I have an apartment, but I live in Cancun. Most of the time I'm out of base and home though due to a monthly s
30 Flymia : Yea I know a ATA L1011 Pilot that lives here in Miami but I am pretty sure there are no L1011s based in Miami area for ATA he must just hop on a fligh
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